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Bradley Walker Tomlin

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Bradley Walker Tomlin

Bradley Walker Tomlin
Born (1899-08-19)August 19, 1899
Syracuse, NY
Died May 11, 1953(1953-05-11) (aged 53)
St. Vincent’s Hospital, New York City
Occupation Abstract expressionist painter.

Bradley Walker Tomlin (August 19, 1899 – May 11, 1953) belonged to the generation of New York School Abstract Expressionist artists. He participated in the famous ‘’Ninth Street Show.’’ According to John I. H. Baur,[1] Curator of the Whitney Museum of American Art, Tomlin’s life and his work were marked by a persistent, restless striving toward perfection, in a truly classical sense of the word, towards that “inner logic” of form which would produce a total harmony, an unalterable rightness, a sense of miraculous completion…It was only during the last five years of his life that the goal was fully reached, and his art flowered with a sure strength and authority.

Biography

Born in Syracuse, New York, Tomlin was the youngest of four children. Since his high school days he wanted to be an artist.

His art teachers were:

Tomlin studied:

Tomlin returned to New York in the fall of 1924. He began exhibiting in 1925 at the Whitney Studio Club. In 1926 Tomlin returned to Europe, where he visited England, Italy and Switzerland but he mainly stayed in Paris. He returned to America in July, 1927. He also discovered Woodstock, New York where he spent his summers.

During the depression Tomlin sought teaching positions:

Selected Solo Exhibitions

  • 1922: Skaneatele and Cazenovia, NY (watercolors)
  • 1925: Anderson Galleries, NY (watercolors)
  • 1926, 1927: Montross Gallery, NY
  • 1931, 1944: Frank K. M. Rehn Galleries, NY
  • 1950, 1953: Betty Parsons Gallery, NY
  • 1955: Phillips Memorial Gallery, Washington, D.C.
  • 1957: “Bradley Walker Tomlin,” circ. Exhibition organized by the Art Galleries of the University of California, Los Angeles, in association with the Whitney Museum of American Art’’

Selected Group Exhibitions

“On Sunday, May 10, 1953, Tomlin drove with his friends to a party at the Jackson Pollocks’ house on Long Island, from which he returned about midnight, feeling ill.”[2] The following day, he was admitted to St. Vincent’s Hospital where he suffered a heart attack and died at seven that night. Bradley Walker Tomlin died at the age of fifty-three.

See also

References

  1. ^ ‘’Bradley Walker Tomlin, catalog, circ. Exhibition organized by the Art Galleries of the University of California, Los Angeles, in association with the Whitney Museum of American Art’’(New York, Published for the Whitney Museum of American Art by Macmillan, 1957.) OLC: 244643 p.15
  2. ^ Bradley Walker Tomlin, catalog, circ. Exhibition organized by the Art Galleries of the University of California, Los Angeles, in association with the Whitney Museum of American Art(New York, Published for the Whitney Museum of American Art by Macmillan, 1957.) OLC: 244643 pp.32,33

Smithsonian Institution Research Information System; Archival, Manuscript and Photographic Collections, Bradley Walker Tomlin

Books

  • Marika Herskovic, American Abstract Expressionism of the 1950s An Illustrated Survey, (New York School Press, 2003.) ISBN 0-9677994-1-4. p. 338-341
  • Marika Herskovic, New York School Abstract Expressionists Artists Choice by Artists, (New York School Press, 2000.) ISBN 0-9677994-0-6. p. 16; p. 38; p. 362-365
  • Müller-Yao, Marguerite Hui: Der Einfluß der Kunst der chinesischen Kalligraphie auf die westliche informelle Malerei, Diss. Bonn, Köln 1985. ISBN 3-88375-051-4

External link for image reproduction

  • Bradley Walker Tomlin's paintings in the Museum of Modern Art, NY from MoMA.org
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