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Bump and run coverage

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Title: Bump and run coverage  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Language: English
Subject: Cornerback, American football strategy, Trap run, Drop-back pass, Spearing (gridiron football)
Collection: American Football Strategy, American Football Terminology
Publisher: World Heritage Encyclopedia
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Bump and run coverage

Bump and run coverage is a strategy often used by defensive backs in American football in which a defensive player lines up directly in front of a wide receiver and tries to impede him with arms, hands, or entire body and disrupt his intended route. This originated in the American Football League in the 1960s, one of whose earliest experts was Willie Brown of the Oakland Raiders. Mel Blount of the Pittsburgh Steelers specialized in this coverage to such a point as to cause a rule change (see below) to make it easier for receivers to run their routes and increase scoring.

Technique

This play works well against routes that require the receiver to be in a certain spot at a certain time. The disadvantage, however, is that the receiver can get behind the cornerback for a big play. This varies from the more traditional defensive formation in which a defensive player will give the receiver a "cushion" of about 5 yards to prevent the receiver from getting behind him. In the NFL, a defensive back is allowed any sort of contact within the 5 yard bump zone except for holding the receiver, otherwise the defensive back can be called for an illegal contact penalty, costing 5 yards and an automatic first down, enforced since 1978, and known colloquially as the Mel Blount Rule. In contrast, under

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