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Cd61

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Cd61

Integrin, beta 3 (platelet glycoprotein IIIa, antigen CD61)

PDB rendering based on 1jv2.
Available structures
PDB Ortholog search: PDBe, RCSB
Identifiers
Symbols  ; BDPLT16; BDPLT2; CD61; GP3A; GPIIIa; GT
External IDs ChEMBL: GeneCards:
RNA expression pattern
Orthologs
Species Human Mouse
Entrez
Ensembl
UniProt
RefSeq (mRNA)
RefSeq (protein)
Location (UCSC)
PubMed search

Integrin beta-3 (β3) or CD61 is a protein that in humans is encoded by the ITGB3 gene.[1] CD61 is a cluster of differentiation found on thrombocytes.

Structure and function

The ITGB3 protein product is the integrin beta chain beta 3. Integrins are integral cell-surface proteins composed of an alpha chain and a beta chain. A given chain may combine with multiple partners resulting in different integrins. Integrin beta 3 is found along with the alpha IIb chain in platelets. Integrins are known to participate in cell adhesion as well as cell-surface-mediated signaling.[2]

Role in endometriosis

Defectively expressed β3 integrin subunit has been correlated with presence of endometriosis, and has been suggested as a putative marker of this condition.[3]

Interactions

CD61 has been shown to interact with PTK2,[4][5] ITGB3BP,[6][7] TLN1[8][9] and CIB1.[10]

See also

References

  1. ^ Sosnoski DM, Emanuel BS, Hawkins AL, van Tuinen P, Ledbetter DH, Nussbaum RL, Kaos FT, Schwartz E, Phillips D, Bennett JS, et al. (August 1988). "Chromosomal localization of the genes for the vitronectin and fibronectin receptors alpha subunits and for platelet glycoproteins IIb and IIIa". J Clin Invest 81 (6): 1993–8.  
  2. ^ "Entrez Gene: ITGB3 integrin, beta 3 (platelet glycoprotein IIIa, antigen CD61)". 
  3. ^ May, K. E.; Villar, J.; Kirtley, S.; Kennedy, S. H.; Becker, C. M. (2011). "Endometrial alterations in endometriosis: A systematic review of putative biomarkers". Human Reproduction Update 17 (5): 637–653.  
  4. ^ Eliceiri, Brian P; Puente Xose S; Hood John D; Stupack Dwayne G; Schlaepfer David D; Huang Xiaozhu Z; Sheppard Dean; Cheresh David A (April 2002). "Src-mediated coupling of focal adhesion kinase to integrin alpha(v)beta5 in vascular endothelial growth factor signaling". J. Cell Biol. (United States) 157 (1): 149–60.  
  5. ^ Chung, J; Gao A G; Frazier W A (June 1997). "Thrombspondin acts via integrin-associated protein to activate the platelet integrin alphaIIbbeta3". J. Biol. Chem. (UNITED STATES) 272 (23): 14740–6.  
  6. ^ Fujimoto, Tetsuro-Takahiro; Katsutani Shinya; Shimomura Takeshi; Fujimura Kingo (January 2002). "Novel alternatively spliced form of beta(3)-endonexin". Thromb. Res. (United States) 105 (1): 63–70.  
  7. ^ Shattil, S J; O'Toole T; Eigenthaler M; Thon V; Williams M; Babior B M; Ginsberg M H (November 1995). "Beta 3-endonexin, a novel polypeptide that interacts specifically with the cytoplasmic tail of the integrin beta 3 subunit". J. Cell Biol. (UNITED STATES) 131 (3): 807–16.  
  8. ^ Patil, S; Jedsadayanmata A; Wencel-Drake J D; Wang W; Knezevic I; Lam S C (October 1999). "Identification of a talin-binding site in the integrin beta(3) subunit distinct from the NPLY regulatory motif of post-ligand binding functions. The talin n-terminal head domain interacts with the membrane-proximal region of the beta(3) cytoplasmic tail". J. Biol. Chem. (UNITED STATES) 274 (40): 28575–83.  
  9. ^ Calderwood, David A; Yan Boxu; de Pereda Jose M; Alvarez Begoña García; Fujioka Yosuke; Liddington Robert C; Ginsberg Mark H (June 2002). "The phosphotyrosine binding-like domain of talin activates integrins". J. Biol. Chem. (United States) 277 (24): 21749–58.  
  10. ^ Naik, U P; Patel P M; Parise L V (February 1997). "Identification of a novel calcium-binding protein that interacts with the integrin alphaIIb cytoplasmic domain". J. Biol. Chem. (UNITED STATES) 272 (8): 4651–4.  

Further reading

External links


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