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Carina of trachea

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Title: Carina of trachea  
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Subject: Trachea, Apex of lung, Oxygen toxicity, Pulmonary alveolus, Tracheal intubation
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Carina of trachea

Carina of trachea
Transverse section of the trachea, just above its bifurcation, with a bird’s-eye view of the interior. (Carina visible but not labeled.)
Details
Latin Carina tracheae, bifurcatio tracheae
System Respiratory system
Dorlands
/Elsevier
c_11/12215629
Anatomical terminology

In anatomy, the carina is a cartilaginous ridge within the trachea that runs antero-posteriorly between the two primary bronchi at the site of the tracheal bifurcation at the lower end of the trachea (usually at the level of the 5th thoracic vertebra, which is in line with the sternal angle, but may raise or descend up to two vertebrae higher or lower with breathing). This ridge lies to the left of the midline. Foreign bodies that fall down the trachea are more likely to enter the right bronchus.

The mucous membrane of the carina is the most sensitive area of the trachea and larynx for triggering a cough reflex. Widening and distortion of the carina is a serious sign because it usually indicates carcinoma of the lymph nodes around the region where the trachea divides.

Tracheobronchial injury, an injury to the airways, occurs within 2.5 cm of the carina 60% of the time.[1]

References

  1. ^ Chu CP, Chen PP (April 2002). "Tracheobronchial injury secondary to blunt chest trauma: Diagnosis and management". Anaesth Intensive Care 30 (2): 145–52.  

External links

  • Atlas image: lung_carina at the University of Michigan Health System - "Cast of trachea and bronchi, anterior view" (#2)
  • "Trachea and carina — tomogram, coronal plane" at SUNY Downstate Medical Center
  • Carina tracheae entry in the public domain NCI Dictionary of Cancer Terms

 This article incorporates public domain material from the U.S. National Cancer Institute document "Dictionary of Cancer Terms".



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