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Cell type

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Cell type

A cell type is a classification used to distinguish between muscle cells and skin cells in humans, that differ both in appearance and function yet are genetically identical. Cells are able to be of the same genotype, but different cell type due to the differential regulation of the genes they contain. Classification of a specific cell type is often done through the use of microscopy and (such as those from the cluster of differentiation family that are commonly used for this purpose in immunology).

Animals have evolved a greater diversity of cell types in a multicellular body (100–150 different cell types), compared with 10–20 in plants, fungi, and protoctists.[1]

Contents

  • Multicellular organisms 1
  • Humans 2
  • See also 3
  • References 4
  • Further reading 5

Multicellular organisms

All higher germ cells and somatic cells. During development, somatic cells will become more specialized and form the three primary germ layers: ectoderm, mesoderm, and endoderm. After formation of the three germ layers, cells will continue to specialize until they reach a terminally differentiated state that is much more resistant to changes in cell type than its progenitors.

Humans

A list of cell types in the human body may include several hundred distinct types depending on the source.[2][3]

See also

References

  1. ^ Margulis, L. & Chapman, M.J. (2009). Kingdoms and Domains: An Illustrated Guide to the Phyla of Life on Earth ([4th ed.]. ed.). Amsterdam: Academic Press/Elsevier. p. 116.
  2. ^ Molecular Biology of the Cell, Fourth Edition, Bruce Alberts, Alexander Johnson, Julian Lewis, Martin Raff, Keith Roberts, Peter Walter
  3. ^ ines.de/cope.cgi COPE database

Further reading

  • The evolution of cell types in animals - a recent review in Nature from 2008
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