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Chelsea F.C. in European football

 

Chelsea F.C. in European football


Chelsea Football Club is an English professional football club based in Fulham, London. The club's involvement in European competition dates back to the 1950s. As champions of England, the club was invited to participate in the inaugural European Champions' Cup in 1955, but withdrew after pressure from the Football League. Three years later, Chelsea made their European debut against Stævnet in the Inter-Cities Fairs Cup, on 30 September 1958.

Chelsea won their first European title in 1971, defeating Real Madrid to win the European Cup Winners' Cup. In 1998, they won the trophy again, followed by the UEFA Super Cup later that year. In 2012 Chelsea won the UEFA Champions League, the fifth English team, and the first from London, to win the competition. In 2013 Chelsea won the UEFA Europa League to become one of four clubs to win all three main UEFA club competitions. Chelsea are presently England's third most successful club in Europe, with five trophies in total.

Midfielder Frank Lampard holds the club record for appearances in European competition with 117, while striker Didier Drogba is the club's leading European goalscorer with 36 goals. Chelsea's biggest European win is 13–0, which came against Jeunesse Hautcharage in the Cup Winners' Cup in 1971. Their 21–0 aggregate win over the same opposition is a record in European football.

Contents

  • European Cup / UEFA Champions League 1
  • Matches 2
  • Finals 3
    • Semi-finals 3.1
  • Overall record 4
    • By competition 4.1
    • By country 4.2
  • All-time goal scorers in major European competitions 5
    • Key 5.1
  • References 6

European Cup / UEFA Champions League

Chelsea were invited to take part in the inaugural European Cup, now UEFA Champions League, in 1955 after they claimed their first league title the previous season. However, Chelsea were bullied into withdrawing from the tournament by the Football League's then-secretary Alan Hardaker, who was notorious for being insular and xenophobic.[1] They had thus missed the chance to become the first English club to participate in and potentially win what is now the most prestigious club competition in European football. It was not until 44 years later that they would make their debut in the Champions League.

The 1999–2000 season saw the club progress through the group stage and the second group stage to reach the quarter-finals where they faced Barcelona of Spain. Chelsea won the first leg 3–1 at Stamford Bridge with Gianfranco Zola scoring the opener and Tore André Flo a brace. However, they were beaten 1-5 in Spain two weeks later and knocked out of the competition 4–6 on aggregate, thus ended their first Champions League journey.[2]

Chelsea qualified for the 2003–04 Champions League by finishing fourth in the 2002–03 Premier League. Their place in the Champions League was secured on the final day of the season, beating fifth-place Liverpool 2–1 at home. The game was dubbed 'the £20m match' as Chelsea were only ahead of Liverpool on goal difference before kickoff; a win for either side would see them qualify for the following season's Champions League at the expense of the other.[3] Jesper Grønkjær scored the winner in the 26th minute. The goal would later seemed by many as the most important in the club's history and said to be worth £1bn, as many believe had Liverpool won on that day the subsequent takeover by Russian billionaire Roman Abramovich would never have happened.[4]

Chelsea reached the semi-finals after defeating derby rivals Arsenal 2–1 at Highbury. Having not beaten Arsenal since November 1998, they went into the second leg with a 1–1 home draw. José Antonio Reyes's goal before the half time gave the Gunners the lead, however Chelsea managed to come back and won in the second half through Frank Lampard's goal within six minutes of the restart and Wayne Bridge's winning goal in the 88th minute.[5]

The first leg of the semi-final however turned out to be a disaster for Chelsea as they were defeated 1–3 by ten-man Monaco at Stade Louis II stadium. Two weeks later at Stamford Bridge, they were leading 2–0 shortly before the halftime. Had they kept this score to the final whistle, they would go through on away goals. However, Monaco eventually came back in the second half and the game ended a 2–2 draw. As a consequence, Claudio Ranieri was sacked at the end of the season.

Chelsea came very close to winning the Champions League several times during the 2000s. The closest they came was in the 2008 UEFA Champions League Final, being held in the Luzhniki Stadium in Moscow. This was the first ever all-English Champions League/European Cup Final, with Chelsea facing Manchester United. The game was tightly contested, with the final score after extra time 1–1. In the penalty shootout, Chelsea were one kick away from winning the Champions League (Petr Čech having saved Cristiano Ronaldo's penalty). But Chelsea's captain John Terry slipped on his run up for the final penalty and his shot hit the post. Edwin van der Sar then saved Nicolas Anelka's spot kick and Manchester United were crowned European Champions for the third time in their history.

The following season, Chelsea were on course to make their second final in two years. Following a 0–0 draw at the Camp Nou, Chelsea were beating Barcelona 1–0 at the Stamford Bridge. In a hugely controversial game, Barcelona managed to score an equaliser in the 94th minute of the game. With the score at 1–1, Barcelona progressed to the 2009 UEFA Champions League Final on away goals. Numerous Chelsea players protested in fury after the final whistle, most notable José Bosingwa and Didier Drogba. Drogba shouted into television cameras that the game was "a fucking disgrace." Both players were handed bans by UEFA for their actions.

Chelsea would not feature in a Champions League Final again until the 2012 Final that was being held in Munich's Allianz Arena. Following several nerve-wracking encounters en route against Napoli, Benfica and Barcelona, Chelsea faced a game against FC Bayern Munich, who would be playing the Final in their home ground. Bayern controlled the game for the most part, and took the lead in the Final in the 83rd minute through Thomas Müller. Didier Drogba restored parity five minutes later with a powerful header from a corner from Juan Mata. In extra time, Bayern missed several opportunities (including a penalty from Chelsea former player Arjen Robben) and the game was to be decided with a Penalty Shootout. Chelsea eventually triumphed 4–3, despite Juan Mata missing their first penalty. Two Bayern Munich players failed to convert their penalties; Ivica Olić and Bastian Schweinsteiger. Didier Drogba scored the crucial, final penalty of the shootout. Chelsea won their first ever Champions League.

It is interesting to note that in each of their Champions League Final appearances (in 2008 and 2012), Chelsea were being managed by an interim/caretaker manager at the time (Avram Grant in 2008 and Roberto Di Matteo in 2012). Di Matteo did receive a permanent contract after winning the 2012 trophy, but was sacked on 21 November that year after just eight months in charge; he had also guided Chelsea to success in the FA Cup as well as the European Cup during his short tenure.[6]

Matches

Season Competition Round Opposition Score
1955–56 European Cup
Denied entry[7]
1958–60 Inter-Cities Fairs Cup First round Copenhagen XI 3–1 (A)
4–1 (H)
Quarter-finals Belgrade XI 1–0 (H)
1–4 (A)
1965–66 Inter-Cities Fairs Cup First round Roma 4–1 (H)
0–0 (A)
Second round Wiener Sport-Club 0–1 (A)
2–0 (H)
Third round Milan 2–1 (H)
1–2 (A)
1–1 (A)[8]
Quarter-finals 1860 München 2–2 (A)
1–0 Stamford Bridge
Semi-finals Barcelona 0–2 (A)
2–0 Stamford Bridge
0–5 (A)
1968–69 Inter-Cities Fairs Cup First round Greenock Morton 5–0 Stamford Bridge
4–3 (A)
Second round DWS 0–0 Stamford Bridge
0–0 (A)[9]
1970–71 European Cup Winners' Cup First round Aris 1–1 (A)
5–1 Stamford Bridge
Second round CSKA Sofia 1–0 (A)
1–0 Stamford Bridge
Quarter-finals Club Brugge 0–2 (A)
4–0 Stamford Bridge
Semi-finals Manchester City 1–0 Stamford Bridge
1–0 (A)
Final Real Madrid 1–1 Karaiskakis Stadium, Athens
2–1 Karaiskakis Stadium, Athens
1971–72 European Cup Winners' Cup First round Jeunesse Hautcharage 8–0 (A)
13–0 Stamford Bridge
Second Round Åtvidabergs 0–0 (A)
1–1 Stamford Bridge[10]
1985–86 UEFA Cup
Banned
1986–87 UEFA Cup
1990–91 UEFA Cup
1994–95 UEFA Cup Winners' Cup First round Viktoria Žižkov 4–2 Stamford Bridge
0–0 (A)
Second round Austria Vienna 0–0 Stamford Bridge
1–1 (A)[11]
Quarter-finals Club Brugge 0–1 (A)
2–0 Stamford Bridge
Semi-finals Real Zaragoza 0–3 (A)
3–1 Stamford Bridge
1997–98 UEFA Cup Winners' Cup First round Slovan Bratislava 2–0 Stamford Bridge
2–0 (A)
Second round Tromsø 2–3 (A)
7–1 Stamford Bridge
Quarter-finals Real Betis 2–1 (A)
3–1 Stamford Bridge
Semi-finals Vicenza Calcio 0–1 (A)
3–1 Stamford Bridge
Final VfB Stuttgart 1–0 Råsunda Stadium, Stockholm
1998 UEFA Super Cup Real Madrid 1–0 Stade Louis II, Monaco
1998–99 UEFA Cup Winners' Cup First round Helsingborg 1–0 Stamford Bridge
0–0 (A)
Second round Copenhagen 1–1 (A)
1–0 Stamford Bridge
Quarter-finals Vålerengens 3–0 Stamford Bridge
3–2 (A)
Semi-finals Real Mallorca 1–1 Stamford Bridge
0–1 (A)
1999–2000 Champions League Third qualifying round Skonto 3–0 Stamford Bridge
0–0 (A)
First Group Stage H Milan 0–0 Stamford Bridge
1–1 (A)
Hertha Berlin 1–2 (A)
2–0 Stamford Bridge
Galatasaray 1–0 Stamford Bridge
5–0 (A)
Second Group Stage D Feyenoord 3–1 Stamford Bridge
3–1 (A)
Lazio 0–0 (A)
1–2 Stamford Bridge
Marseille 0–1 (A)
1–0 Stamford Bridge
Quarter-finals Barcelona 3–1 Stamford Bridge
1–5 (A)
2000–01 UEFA Cup First round St. Gallen 1–0 Stamford Bridge
0–2 (A)
2001–02 UEFA Cup First round Levski Sofia 3–0 Stamford Bridge
2–0 (A)
Second round Hapoel Tel Aviv 0–2 (A)
1–1 Stamford Bridge
2002–03 UEFA Cup First round Viking 2–1 Stamford Bridge
2–4 (A)
2003–04 Champions League Third qualifying round Žilina 2–0 (A)
3–0 Stamford Bridge
Group G Sparta Prague 1–0 (A)
0–0 Stamford Bridge
Beşiktaş 0–2 Stamford Bridge
2–0 (A)
Lazio 2–1 Stamford Bridge
4–0 (A)
Round of 16 VfB Stuttgart 1–0 (A)
0–0 Stamford Bridge
Quarter-finals Arsenal 1–1 Stamford Bridge
2–1 (A)
Semi-finals Monaco 1–3 (A)
2–2 Stamford Bridge
2004–05 Champions League Group H Paris Saint-Germain 3–0 (A)
0–0 Stamford Bridge
Porto 3–1 Stamford Bridge
1–2 (A)
CSKA Moscow 2–0 Stamford Bridge
1–0 (A)
Round of 16 Barcelona 1–2 (A)
4–2 Stamford Bridge
Quarter-finals Bayern Munich 4–2 Stamford Bridge
2–3 (A)
Semi-finals Liverpool 0–0 Stamford Bridge
0–1 (A)
2005–06 Champions League Group G Anderlecht 1–0 Stamford Bridge
2–0 (A)
Liverpool 0–0 (A)
0–0 Stamford Bridge
Real Betis 4–0 Stamford Bridge
0–1 (A)
Round of 16 Barcelona 1–2 Stamford Bridge
1–1 (A)
2006–07 Champions League Group A Werder Bremen 2–0 Stamford Bridge
0–1 (A)
Levski Sofia 3–1 (A)
2–0 Stamford Bridge
Barcelona 1–0 Stamford Bridge
2–2 (A)
Round of 16 Porto 1–1 (A)
2–1 Stamford Bridge
Quarter-finals Valencia 1–1 Stamford Bridge
2–1 (A)
Semi-finals Liverpool 1–0 Stamford Bridge
0–1 (A)[12]
2007–08 Champions League Group B Rosenborg 1–1 Stamford Bridge
4–0 (A)
Valencia 2–1 (A)
0–0 Stamford Bridge
Schalke 2–0 (H)
0–0 Stamford Bridge
Round of 16 Olympiacos 0–0 Stamford Bridge
3–0 (A)
Quarter-finals Fenerbahçe 1–2 (A)
2–0 Stamford Bridge
Semi-finals Liverpool 1–1 (A)
3–2 Stamford Bridge
Final Manchester United 1–1 Luzhniki Stadium, Moscow[13]
2008–09 Champions League Group A Bordeaux 4–0 Stamford Bridge
1–1 (A)
Cluj 0–0 (A)
2–1 Stamford Bridge
Roma 1–0 Stamford Bridge
1–3 (A)
Round of 16 Juventus 1–0 Stamford Bridge
2–2 (A)
Quarter-finals Liverpool 3–1 (A)
4–4 Stamford Bridge
Semi-finals Barcelona 0–0 (A)
1–1 Stamford Bridge[10]
2009–10 Champions League Group D Porto 1–0 Stamford Bridge
1–0 (A)
APOEL 1–0 (A)
2–2 Stamford Bridge
Atlético Madrid 4–0 Stamford Bridge
2–2 (A)
Round of 16 Inter Milan 1–2 (A)
0–1 Stamford Bridge
2010–11 Champions League Group F Žilina 4–1 (A)
2–1 Stamford Bridge
Marseille 2–0 Stamford Bridge
0–1 (A)
Spartak Moscow 2–0 (A)
4–1 Stamford Bridge
Round of 16 Copenhagen 2–0 (A)
0–0 Stamford Bridge
Quarter-finals Manchester United 0–1 Stamford Bridge
1–2 (A)
2011–12 Champions League Group E Leverkusen 2–0 Stamford Bridge
1–2 (A)
Valencia 1–1 (A)
3–0 Stamford Bridge
Genk 5–0 Stamford Bridge (A)
1–1 (A)
Round of 16 Napoli 1–3 (A)
4–1 Stamford Bridge
Quarter-finals Benfica 1–0 (A)
2–1 Stamford Bridge
Semi-finals Barcelona 1–0 Stamford Bridge
2–2 (A)
Final Bayern Munich 1–1 Allianz Arena, Munich[14]
2012 Super Cup Atlético Madrid 1–4 Stade Louis II, Monaco
2012–13 Champions League Group E Juventus 2–2 Stamford Bridge
0–3 (A)
Nordsjælland 4–0 (A)
6–1 Stamford Bridge
Shakhtar Donetsk 1–2 (A)
3–2 Stamford Bridge
2012–13 Europa League Round of 32 Sparta Prague 1–0 (A)
1–1 Stamford Bridge
Round of 16 Steaua București 0–1 (A)
3–1 Stamford Bridge
Quarter-finals Rubin Kazan 3–1 Stamford Bridge
2–3 (A)
Semi-finals Basel 2–1 (A)
3–1 Stamford Bridge
Final Benfica 2–1 Amsterdam Arena, Amsterdam
2013 Super Cup Bayern Munich 1–1 Eden Arena, Prague[15]
2013–14 Champions League Group E Schalke 04 3–0 (A)
3–0 Stamford Bridge
Basel 1–2 Stamford Bridge
0–1 (A)
Steaua București 4–0 (A)
1–0 Stamford Bridge
Round of 16 Galatasaray 1–1 (A)
2–0 Stamford Bridge
Quarter-finals Paris Saint-Germain 1–3 (A)
2–0 Stamford Bridge
Semi-finals Atlético Madrid 0–0 (A)
1–3 Stamford Bridge
2014–15 Champions League Group G Schalke 04 1–1 Stamford Bridge
5–0 (A)
Sporting CP 1–0 (A)
3–1 Stamford Bridge
Maribor 6–0 Stamford Bridge
1–1 (A)
Round of 16 Paris Saint-Germain 1–1 (A)
2–2 Stamford Bridge
2015–16 Champions League Group G Maccabi Tel-Aviv 4–0 Stamford Bridge

Finals

Year Competition Opposing Team Score Venue
1971 Cup Winners' Cup Real Madrid 1–1 (a.e.t.)
2–1 (Replay)
Karaiskakis Stadium, Athens
1998 Cup Winners' Cup Stuttgart 1–0 Råsunda Stadium, Stockholm
2008 Champions League Manchester United 1–1 (a.e.t.) (5–6 p.s.) Luzhniki Stadium, Moscow
2012 Champions League Bayern Munich 1–1 (a.e.t.) (4–3 p.s.) Allianz Arena, Munich
2013 Europa League Benfica 2–1 Amsterdam Arena, Amsterdam

Semi-finals

Year Competition Opposing team Score Where the Final was Other Semi-finalists
1966 Inter-Cities Fairs Cup Barcelona 2–2 on aggregate
lost 5–0 in play-off
Two-legged final Real Zaragoza
Leeds United
1971 Cup Winners' Cup Manchester City 2–0 on aggregate Karaiskakis Stadium, Athens Real Madrid
PSV Eindhoven
1995 Cup Winners' Cup Real Zaragoza 3–4 on aggregate Parc des Princes Arsenal
Sampdoria
1998 Cup Winners' Cup Vicenza 3–2 on aggregate Råsunda Stadium VfB Stuttgart
Lokomotiv Moscow
1999 Cup Winners' Cup Real Mallorca 1–2 on aggregate Villa Park Lazio
Lokomotiv Moscow
2004 Champions League Monaco 3–5 on aggregate Arena AufSchalke Porto
Deportivo La Coruña
2005 Champions League Liverpool 0–1 on aggregate Atatürk Olympic Stadium Milan
PSV Eindhoven
2007 Champions League Liverpool 1–1 on aggregate
Lost 4–1 on penalties
Olympic Stadium Milan
Manchester United
2008 Champions League Liverpool 4–3 on aggregate Luzhniki Stadium Manchester United
FC Barcelona
2009 Champions League Barcelona 1–1 on aggregate
Lost on away goals rule
Stadio Olimpico Manchester United
Arsenal
2012 Champions League Barcelona 3–2 on aggregate Allianz Arena Bayern Munich
Real Madrid
2013 Europa League Basel 5–2 on aggregate Amsterdam Arena Benfica
Fenerbahçe
2014 Champions League Atlético Madrid 1–3 on aggregate Estádio da Luz Bayern Munich
Real Madrid

Overall record

By competition

Statistics are correct as of 27 July 2015.[16]
Competition Seasons Games Wins Draws Losses Goals scored Goals against Goal difference
European Cup / Champions League 12 144 73 42 29 242 123 +119
Cup Winners' Cup 5 39 23 10 6 81 28 +53
Inter-Cities Fairs Cup / UEFA Cup / Europa League 7 37 20 7 10 61 44 +17
UEFA Super Cup 3 3 1 1 1 4 6 –2
Total 23[17] 223 117 60 46 388 201 +187

By country

Country Pld W D L GF GA GD Win%
 Austria 4 1 2 1 3 2 +1 25.00
 Belgium 6 4 0 2 9 3 +6 66.67
 Bulgaria 6 6 0 0 12 1 +11 100.000
 Cyprus 2 1 1 0 3 2 +1 50.00
 Czech Republic 6 3 3 0 7 3 +4 50.00
 Denmark 4 3 1 0 19 4 +15 75.00
 England 15 6 7 2 18 13 +5 40.00
 France 13 5 5 3 20 13 +7 38.46
 Germany / West Germany 18 10 5 3 32 13 +19 55.56
 Greece 4 2 2 0 9 2 +7 50.00
 Israel 2 0 1 1 1 3 −2 00.00
 Italy 21 7 7 7 27 24 +3 33.33
 Latvia 2 1 1 0 3 0 +3 50.00
 Luxembourg 2 2 0 0 21 0 +21 100.000
 Netherlands 4 2 2 0 6 2 +4 50.00
 Norway 8 5 1 2 24 12 +12 62.50
 Portugal 9 7 1 1 15 7 +8 77.78
 Romania 6 4 1 1 10 3 +7 66.67
 Russia 4 3 0 1 8 4 +4 75.00
 Scotland 2 2 0 0 9 3 +6 100.000
 Slovakia 5 5 0 0 13 1 +12 100.000
 Slovenia 2 1 1 0 7 1 +6 50.00
 Spain 33 13 10 10 47 46 +1 39.39
 Sweden 4 1 3 0 2 1 +1 25.00
  Switzerland 6 3 0 3 7 7 +0 50.00
 Turkey 8 5 1 2 14 5 +9 62.50
 Ukraine 2 1 0 1 4 4 +0 50.00
 Yugoslavia 2 1 0 1 2 4 −2 50.00

All-time goal scorers in major European competitions

Below are all-time scorers in major UEFA club competitions, including qualifying rounds. Names, that appear in italics, indicate players currently playing for the first team.

Statistics are correct as of 27 July 2015.[18]

Key

CL European Cup / UEFA Champions League
CWC UEFA Cup Winners' Cup
UEL UEFA Cup / UEFA Europa League
SC UEFA Super Cup
Ranking Name Years CL CWC UEL SC Total
1 Drogba, DidierDidier Drogba 2004–2012, 2014–2015 36 0 0 0 36
2 Lampard, FrankFrank Lampard 2001–2014 23 0 2 0 25
3 Torres, FernandoFernando Torres 2011–2014 10 0 6 1 17
4 Anelka, NicolasNicolas Anelka 2008–2012 12 0 0 0 12
4 Flo, Tore AndréTore André Flo 1997–2001 8 4 0 0 12
4 Osgood, PeterPeter Osgood 1964–1974 0 12 0 0 12
7 Terry, JohnJohn Terry 1998– 8 0 3 0 11
8 Zola, GianfrancoGianfranco Zola 1996–2003 3 5 1 0 9
9 Ivanović, BranislavBranislav Ivanović 2008– 7 0 1 0 8
9 Guðjohnsen, EiðurEiður Guðjohnsen 2000–2006 5 0 3 0 8
11 Hazard, EdenEden Hazard 2012– 5 0 1 1 7
11 , OscarOscar 2012– 6 0 1 0 7
11 , RamiresRamires 2010– 7 0 0 0 7
11 Kalou, SalomonSalomon Kalou 2006–2012 7 0 0 0 7
11 Vialli, GianlucaGianluca Vialli 1996–1999 0 7 0 0 7
16 Cole, JoeJoe Cole 2003–2010 6 0 0 0 6
16 Essien, MichaelMichael Essien 2005–2014 6 0 0 0 6
16 Mata, JuanJuan Mata 2011–2014 5 0 1 0 6
16 Wise, DennisDennis Wise 1990–2001 4 2 0 0 6
16 Baldwin, TommyTommy Baldwin 1966–1974 0 6 0 0 6
21 Moses, VictorVictor Moses 2012– 1 0 4 0 5
21 Luiz, DavidDavid Luiz 2011–2014 3 0 2 0 5
23 Cahill, GaryGary Cahill 2012– 3 0 0 1 4
23 Shevchenko, AndriyAndriy Shevchenko 2006–2008 4 0 0 0 4
23 Ballack, MichaelMichael Ballack 2006–2010 4 0 0 0 4
23 Crespo, HernánHernán Crespo 2003–2004, 2005–2006 4 0 0 0 4
23 Poyet, GusGus Poyet 1997–2001 2 1 0 1 4
23 Hollins, JohnJohn Hollins 1963–1975, 1983–1984 0 4 0 0 4
23 Houseman, PeterPeter Houseman 1963–1975 0 4 0 0 4
30 Ba, DembaDemba Ba 2013–2014 3 0 0 0 3
30 Duff, DamienDamien Duff 2003–2006 3 0 0 0 3
30 Eto'o, SamuelSamuel Eto'o 2013–2014 3 0 0 0 3
30 Malouda, FlorentFlorent Malouda 2007–2013 3 0 0 0 3
30 Babayaro, CelestineCelestine Babayaro 1997–2005 2 1 0 0 3
30 Hasselbaink, Jimmy FloydJimmy Floyd Hasselbaink 2000–2004 2 0 1 0 3
30 Leboeuf, FrankFrank Leboeuf 1996–2001 1 2 0 0 3
30 Petrescu, DanDan Petrescu 1995–2000 1 2 0 0 3
30 Di Matteo, RobertoRoberto Di Matteo 1996–2002 0 3 0 0 3
30 Furlong, PaulPaul Furlong 1994–1996 0 3 0 0 3
30 Hutchinson, IanIan Hutchinson 1968–1976 0 3 0 0 3
30 Sinclair, FrankFrank Sinclair 1990–1998 0 3 0 0 3
30 Webb, DavidDavid Webb 1968–1974 0 3 0 0 3
43 Cesc Fàbregas 2014– 2 0 0 0 2
43 Nemanja Matić 2009–2010, 2014– 2 0 0 0 2
43 Schürrle, AndréAndré Schürrle 2013–2015 2 0 0 0 2
43 Alex 2007–2012 2 0 0 0 2
43 Bridge, WayneWayne Bridge 2003–2009 2 0 0 0 2
43 Carvalho, RicardoRicardo Carvalho 2004–2010 2 0 0 0 2
43 Meireles, RaulRaul Meireles 2011–2012 2 0 0 0 2
43 Robben, ArjenArjen Robben 2004–2007 2 0 0 0 2
43 Sturridge, DanielDaniel Sturridge 2009–2013 2 0 0 0 2
43 Hudson, AlanAlan Hudson 1968–1974, 1983–1984 0 2 0 0 2
43 Stein, MarkMark Stein 1993–1998 0 2 0 0 2
54 Willian 2013– 1 0 0 0 1
54 Loïc Rémy 2014– 1 0 0 0 1
54 John Obi Mikel 2006– 1 0 0 0 1
54 Ambrosetti, GabrieleGabriele Ambrosetti 1999–2003 1 0 0 0 1
54 Deschamps, DidierDidier Deschamps 1999–2000 1 0 0 0 1
54 Ferrer, AlbertAlbert Ferrer 1998–2003 1 0 0 0 1
54 Gallas, WilliamWilliam Gallas 2001–2006 1 0 0 0 1
54 Grønkjær, JesperJesper Grønkjær 2000–2004 1 0 0 0 1
54 Robert Huth 2002–2006 1 0 0 0 1
54 Glen Johnson 2003–2007 1 0 0 0 1
54 Mutu, AdrianAdrian Mutu 2003–2004 1 0 0 0 1
54 Wright-Phillips, ShaunShaun Wright-Phillips 2005–2008 1 0 0 0 1
54 Smertin, AlexeyAlexey Smertin 2003–2006 1 0 0 0 1
54 Sutton, ChrisChris Sutton 1999–2000 1 0 0 0 1
54 Zhirkov, YuriYuri Zhirkov 2009–2011 1 0 0 0 1
54 Dempsey, JohnJohn Dempsey 1969–1978 0 1 0 0 1
54 Desailly, MarcelMarcel Desailly 1998–2004 0 1 0 0 1
54 Granville, DannyDanny Granville 1997–1998 0 1 0 0 1
54 Harris, RonRon Harris 1961–1980 0 1 0 0 1
54 Hinton, MarvinMarvin Hinton 1963–1976 0 1 0 0 1
54 Hughes, MarkMark Hughes 1995–1998 0 1 0 0 1
54 Lambourde, BernardBernard Lambourde 1997–2001 0 1 0 0 1
54 Laudrup, BrianBrian Laudrup 1998–1999 0 1 0 0 1
54 Rocastle, DavidDavid Rocastle 1994–1998 0 1 0 0 1
54 Smethurst, DerekDerek Smethurst 1968–1971 0 1 0 0 1
54 John Spencer 1992–1997 0 1 0 0 1
54 de Lucas, EnriqueEnrique de Lucas 2002–2003 0 0 1 0 1
54 Panucci, ChristianChristian Panucci 2000 (on loan from Inter Milan) 0 0 1 0 1
Total 234 81 28 4 347

References

  1. ^ "I don't like dealing with Europe," Hardaker would later tell the Sunday Times football correspondent Brian Glanville, "too many wops and dagoes." [1]
  2. ^
  3. ^
  4. ^
  5. ^
  6. ^ [2]
  7. ^ As English champions Chelsea qualified for the inaugural European Cup, but were denied entry by the Football League, whose chairman Alan Hardaker felt priority should be given to domestic competitions.
  8. ^ Won on a toss of a coin
  9. ^ Lost on a toss of a coin
  10. ^ a b Lost on the Away goals rule
  11. ^ Won on the Away goals rule
  12. ^ Lost 4–1 on Penalties
  13. ^ Lost 6–5 on Penalties
  14. ^ Won 4–3 on Penalties
  15. ^ Lost 5–4 on Penalties
  16. ^
  17. ^ In the 1998–99 season, Chelsea played in the UEFA Cup Winner's Cup and in the UEFA Super Cup. In the 2012–13 season, Chelsea played in the UEFA Champions League, UEFA Europa League and UEFA Super Cup. In the 2013–14 season, Chelsea played in the UEFA Champions League and UEFA Super Cup.
  18. ^
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