Cinnamon rolls


A cinnamon roll (also cinnamon bun, cinnamon swirl and cinnamon snail[1][2]) is a sweet roll served commonly in Northern Europe and North America. Its primary ingredients are flour, sugar, cooking oil or butter, and cinnamon, which provide a robust and sweet flavor. It is most commonly eaten as a breakfast food and is often served with cottage cheese or icing.

About

It consists of a rolled sheet of yeast-leavened dough onto which a cinnamon and sugar mixture (and raisins or other ingredients in some rare cases) is sprinkled over a thin coat of butter. The dough is then rolled, cut into individual portions, and baked. In North America, cinnamon rolls are frequently topped with icing (often confectioner's sugar based) or glaze of some sort. In northern Europe, nib sugar is often used instead of icing.

In Sweden, the country of its presumed origin, the cinnamon roll takes the name of kanelbulle (literally: "cinnamon bun") and October 4 has more recently started to be promoted as "kanelbullens dag" (Cinnamon roll day).[3][4] A German variety originating in Hamburg and its surroundings is the Franzbrötchen.


The size of a cinnamon roll varies from place to place, but many vendors supply a smaller size about 5 centimetres (2.0 in) in diameter and a larger size about 10 centimetres (3.9 in) to a side. The largest variety can be found in Finland, called Korvapuusti, where it can be up to 20 centimetres (7.9 in) in diameter and weighing 200 grams (7.1 oz).[5]

The Finnish "Boston cake" is a "cake" made by baking cinnamon rolls in a round cake pan instead of baking them separately, so that they stick together to form a round cake.[6]

Honey bun

Main article: Honey bun

A honey bun is a sweet roll not very much, but slightly similar to the cinnamon bun that is popular in the southeast United States. "A honey bun is a fried yeast pastry that contains honey and a swirl of cinnamon in the dough and is glazed with icing. According to legend, Howard Griffin of Griffin Pie Co. in Greensboro, North Carolina, developed the first honey bun in 1954. Flowers Foods acquired Griffin Pie Co. in 1983. Although the Greensboro bakery is now closed, honey buns remain a best-seller for Flowers."[7] Unlike cinnamon buns, which are generally the product of bakeries, honey buns are common convenience store and vending machine fare. Normally sold individually wrapped, alone or in boxes of 6 or more, they are a popular grab-and-go breakfast, eaten cold or heated in a microwave oven.

See also

North America portal
Europe portal
Food portal
  • Cinnabon - Bakery chain known for cinnamon rolls
  • Chelsea bun - Confectionary made using a similar process
  • Sweet roll
  • Tahini roll
  • Fig roll
  • Tahinopita

References

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