World Library  
Flag as Inappropriate
Email this Article

Citadis

Article Id: WHEBN0023657708
Reproduction Date:

Title: Citadis  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Language: English
Subject: Transport in France, Rotterdam, Tram, Tours, Trams in Melbourne, Linear motor, Light rail, Nickel–metal hydride battery, Transport in Argentina, Alstom
Collection:
Publisher: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Publication
Date:
 

Citadis

File:Paris T3 Balard.ogg

The Citadis is a family of low-floor trams built by Alstom in La Rochelle, France, and Barcelona, Spain. More than 1140 Citadis trams are in use in over 28 cities,[1] including: Tunis, Bordeaux, Grenoble, Lyon, Montpellier, Orléans, the Paris area, and Barcelona, Dublin, Istanbul, Gdańsk, Katowice, Adelaide, Melbourne, Jerusalem, Rabat, Casablanca and Rotterdam outside France.

Citadis types

The Citadis family includes both partially low-floor and 100% low-floor trams, in versions with three, five, and seven sections.

The Citadis family comprises:

The 70% low-floor “Regio-Citadis” variant allows for tram-train operation, in which trams run also on mainline railway tracks; it is used in the German city Kassel, and has been delivered for The Hague. This train type is having possibilities of duo-powering (diesel/600 VDC, 600 VDC/1,5 kV 16 Hz or 600 VDC/Bioenergy/diesel).

The Regio-Citadis model has now been superseded by "Citadis-Dualis", redesigned to operate on the same lines as regional trains (on the TER (Transport express régional) network) and intended for running at up to 100 km/h (62 mph), compared to 70 km/h (43 mph) for the Citadis tram), and for stop spacings ranging from 0.5 to 5 km (0.31 to 3.11 mi). 31 have been ordered (plus 169 on option [5]) by the SNCF at an average cost of 3.2 million per car (about $4.94 million or £2.5 million).[6]

Like most trams, Citadis vehicles are usually powered by overhead electric wires, but the trams in Bordeaux, Angers, and Reims (and in the future Dubai) use the “Aps” (ground-level power supply), a third rail which is only powered while it is completely covered by a tram so that there is no risk of a person or animal coming into contact with a live rail. In outer areas, the trams switch to conventional overhead wires.[7]

Competitors to the Citadis include Bombardier Transportation's Flexity family (Outlook, Swift, Classic, and the Link tram-train), Siemens Combino and Avanto trams, Škoda ForCity, Ansaldo Sirio and TMK 2200 from Crotram.

Ordered Citadis trams

Africa

Country City Image Type Fleet numbers Quantity Year Length (m) Width (m) Comments
 Algeria Algiers 302 101–141 41 2010
 Algeria Constantine 402 101–127 27 2010 43.9
 Algeria Oran 402 101–130 30 2010 43.9
 Morocco Casablanca 302 74 2012 Able to MU
 Morocco Rabat–Salé 302 32 44 2010 19 double trams, 6 single bidirectional trams
 Tunisia Tunis 302 401–430 30 2007 32 - 64 in MU 2.4

North America

Country City Type Fleet numbers Quantity Year Length
(m or
ft in)
Width
(m or
ft in)
Comments
 Canada Ottawa - Confederation Line Citadis Spirit (variant of 302) 30 (options for more) 2018 49 2.65 m or 8 ft 8.3 in 2 car trains totaling 98 m (321 ft 6.3 in) with a capacity of 600 passengers. Train to be built in Hornell, NY and final assembly in Ottawa[8]

South America

Country City Type Fleet numbers Quantity Year Length (m) Width (m) Comments
 Brazil Rio de Janeiro 402 2016 With APS system

Mideast

Country City Image Type Fleet numbers Quantity Year Length (m) Width (m) Comments
 Israel Jerusalem 302 46 2009
 United Arab Emirates Dubai 402 25 APS[9]

Europe

Country City Image Type Fleet numbers No. Year Length (m) Width (m) Comments
 France Angers 302 17 2009 32.4 2.40
 France Aubagne Compact 8[4] 2014 22 First Citadis Compact ordered. Options for 10[4]
 France Bordeaux 402 2201 - 2232
2301 - 2306
2501 - 2520
2801 - 2804
62 2002
2003
2005
2008
2011
43.9 2.40
 France Bordeaux 302 2241 - 2246
2541 - 2546
12[10][11] 2002
2005
32.8 2.40
 France Grenoble 402[12] 6001 - 6035 35 2005 43 2.40
 France Grenoble 402 6036 - 6050 14 2009 43 2.40
 France Le Havre  ? 22 2011–2012
 France Le Mans 302 01 - 23 23 2007 32.0 2.40
 France Lyon 302 0801 - 0847 47[13] 2000 32.4 2.40
 France Lyon 302 0848 - 0857 10 2006 32.4 2.40
 France Lyon 302 0858 - 0870 13 2009 32.4 2.40
 France Lyon 302 0871 - 0873 3 2010 32.4 2.40
 France Montpellier 301 2001–2028 30[14] 1999–2000 40.9
 France Montpellier 302 2031–2033, 2041–2064 27 2006–2007 32.5
 France Montpellier 402 23 43
 France Mulhouse 302 01 - 27 27 2005–2006 32.5
 France Nice 302 01 - 20 20 2006–2007 33
 France Nice 302 21 - 28 8 2010 33
 France Orléans 301 39 - 60 22[15] 2000 29.9 2.32
 France Orléans 302 61 - 81 21[16] 2010–2011 32.3 2.40
 France Paris 302 0401 - 0413, 0414 - 0426 26[17] 2002, 2003 32.2 2.40 T2
 France Paris 302 0427 - 0442 16 2008 32.2 2.40 T2
 France Paris 302 0442 - 0459 18 2010 32.2 2.40 T2
 France Paris 402 0301 - 0321 21 2006 43.7 2.65 T3
 France Paris 402 0322 - 0346 25[18] 2012 43.7 2.65 T3
 France Paris 302 19[19] 2013 32 2.4 T7
 France Paris 302 20[19] 2014 32 2.4 T8
 France Reims 302 101 - 118 18[20][21] 2010 32.4 2.40
 France Rouen 402 27 2011–2012 40-45 2.40 To replace the TFS[22]
 France Strasbourg 403 2001–2041 41[23] 2005–2006 45.1 2.40
 France Toulouse 302 24 2009–2010 32.4 2.40 Designed by Airbus
 France Tours 402 21[24] 2012–2013 43 2.40 APS
 France Valenciennes 302 33 2006 33 2.40
 Germany Kassel RegioCitadis 701 - 718 18 2004–2005 36.8 2.65
 Germany Kassel RegioCitadis 751 - 760 9 2004–2005 36.8 2.65 Hybrid with diesel engine
 Ireland Dublin 301 3001 - 3026 26 2003–2004 40 2.40 Red line, in 2007 extended from 30 to 40 m
 Ireland Dublin 401 4001 - 4014 14 2003–2004 40 2.40 Red line (transferred from green line 2010)
 Ireland Dublin 402 5001 - 5026 26 2009 43 Green line
 Netherlands The Hague RegioCitadis 4001 - 4054 54 2006 36.8 2.65
 Netherlands The Hague RegioCitadis 4055 - 4072 18 2011 36.8 2.65
 Netherlands Rotterdam 302 2001–2060 60 2003 31.6 2.4 Unidirectional
 Netherlands Rotterdam 302 2101–2153 53 2009 30 2.4 Unidirectional
 Poland Gdańsk NGd99 1001–1004 4 1999 26.6 2.35 Marketed as the Konstal NGd99, based on 100 series
 Poland Katowice 116Nd 800–816 17 2000 24 2.35
 Spain Barcelona 302 19 2004 32 2.65 Trambaix network
 Spain Barcelona 302 18 2007 32 2.65 Trambesòs network
 Spain Jaén 302 5 2010 32 2.40
 Spain Madrid 302 70 2007 32 One of those types are in use on the Lidingöbanan in Stockholm, Sweden for testing, as the current cars are getting very old.
 Spain Tenerife 302 20 2007 32.2 2.40
 Spain Murcia 302 11 2011 32 2.40
 Turkey Istanbul X-04 801-837 37 2009 28 2.65 Able to MU
 UK Nottingham 302 216 - 237 22[25] 2014 NET Citadis poster

Oceania

Country City Image Type Fleet numbers Quantity Year Length (m) Width (m) Comments
 Australia Adelaide 302[26] 6[26] 2010[27] 32 2.4 Purchased from Madrid in 2009, being surplus to their demands.[26][28]
 Australia Melbourne 202[29] 3001–3036[30] 36[30] 2001–2002[30] 23.0[30] 2.65[30] Locally designated C-class.[30]
 Australia Melbourne 302[31] 5103, 5106, 5111, 5113, 5123[32] 5[32] 2005–2006[32] 32.5[32] 2.65[32] Locally designated C2-class.[32]
Leased from Mulhouse, France in 2008, and later purchased by the Victorian government.[33]

See also

References

External links

  • Alstom Transport
  • Alstom Citadis Trams
  • List of all ordered Citadis (en Français/in French) (read the notes written by visitors at the end of the page, because there are some errors in the table)
  • Railway Gazette International
This article was sourced from Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. World Heritage Encyclopedia content is assembled from numerous content providers, Open Access Publishing, and in compliance with The Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR), Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., Public Library of Science, The Encyclopedia of Life, Open Book Publishers (OBP), PubMed, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and USA.gov, which sources content from all federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial government publication portals (.gov, .mil, .edu). Funding for USA.gov and content contributors is made possible from the U.S. Congress, E-Government Act of 2002.
 
Crowd sourced content that is contributed to World Heritage Encyclopedia is peer reviewed and edited by our editorial staff to ensure quality scholarly research articles.
 
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. World Heritage Encyclopedia™ is a registered trademark of the World Public Library Association, a non-profit organization.
 


Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from Project Gutenberg are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.