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Clopenthixol

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Clopenthixol

Clopenthixol
Systematic (IUPAC) name
(E,Z)-2-[4-[3-(2-chlorothioxanthen-9-ylidene) propyl]piperazin-1-yl]ethanol
Clinical data
Legal status
?
Routes Oral
Identifiers
CAS number  N
ATC code N05
PubChem
ChemSpider  N
UNII  N
KEGG  N
ChEMBL  N
Chemical data
Formula C22H25ClN2OS 
Mol. mass 400.965 g/mol
 N   

Clopenthixol (Sordinol), also known as clopentixol, is a typical antipsychotic drug of the thioxanthene class. It was introduced by Lundbeck in 1961.[1]

Clopenthixol is a racemic mixture of cis and trans isomers. Zuclopenthixol, the pure cis isomer, was later introduced by Lundbeck in 1962,[2] and has been much more widely used. Both drugs are equally effective as antipsychotics and have similar adverse effect profiles, but clopenthixol is half as active on a milligram-to-milligram basis and appears to produce more sedation in comparison.[3]

Clopenthixol is not approved for use in the United States.

See also

References

  1. ^ Sneader, Walter (2005). Drug discovery: a history. New York: Wiley. p. 410.  
  2. ^ José Miguel Vela; Helmut Buschmann; Jörg Holenz; Antonio Párraga; Antoni Torrens (2007). Antidepressants, Antipsychotics, Anxiolytics: From Chemistry and Pharmacology to Clinical Application. Weinheim: Wiley-VCH. p. 516.  
  3. ^ Gravem A, Engstrand E, Guleng RJ (November 1978). "Cis(Z)-clopenthixol and clopenthixol (Sordinol) in chronic psychotic patients. A double-blind clinical investigation". Acta Psychiatr Scand 58 (5): 384–8.  

External links


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