World Library  
Flag as Inappropriate
Email this Article

Coated paper

Article Id: WHEBN0005489107
Reproduction Date:

Title: Coated paper  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Language: English
Subject: Paper, Paper bag, Parchment paper, Photographic paper, Correction paper
Collection: Chemical Processes, Coated Paper, Packaging Materials, Paper, Papermaking
Publisher: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Publication
Date:
 

Coated paper

Coated paper is starch. The coating formulation may also contain chemical additives as dispersants, resins, PE: to give water resistance and wet strength to the paper,[2] or to protect against ultraviolet radiation.

Contents

  • Varieties 1
    • Machine-finished coated paper 1.1
    • Coated fine paper 1.2
    • Others 1.3
  • See also 2
  • References 3
  • Further reading 4

Varieties

Machine-finished coated paper

Machine-finished coated paper (MFC) has a basis weight of 48–80 g/m2. They have good surface properties, high print gloss and adequate sheet stiffness. MFC papers are made of 60–85% groundwood or TMP and 15–40% chemical pulp with a total pigment content of 20–30%. The paper can be soft nip calendered or supercalendered.[3] These are often used in paperbacks.

Coated fine paper

Coated fine paper or woodfree coated paper (WFC) are mainly produced for offset printing:[4]

Standard coated fine papers
This paper quality is normally used for advertising materials, books, annual reports and high quality catalogs. Grammage ranges from 90–170 g/m2 and ISO brightness between 80–96%. The fibre furnish consists of more than 90% chemical pulp. Total pigment content are in the range 30–45%, where calcium carbonate and clay are the most common.
Low coat weight papers
These paper grades have lower coat weights than the standard WFC (3–14 g/m2/side) and the grammage and pigment content are also generally lower, 55–135 g/m2 and 20–35% respectively.
Art papers
Art papers are one of the highest quality printing papers and are used for illustrated books, calendars and brochures. The grammage varies from 100 to 230 g/m2. These papergrades are triple coated with 20 - > 40 g/m2/side and have matte or glossy finish. Higher qualities often contain cotton.

Others

Other types of paper coatings include polyethylene or polyolefin extrusion coating, silicone, and wax coating to make release liners, paper cups and photographic paper. Biopolymer coatings are available as more sustainable alternatives to common petrochemical coatings. [5]

See also

References

  1. ^ Grades of Paper: Coated Paper
  2. ^ Diana Twede and Susan E. M. Selke (2005). Cartons, crates and corrugated board: handbook of paper and wood packaging technology. DEStech Publications. p. 325.  
  3. ^ Paulapuro, Hannu (2000). "1". Paper and Board grades. Papermaking Science and Technology 18. Finland: Fapet Oy. p. 35.  
  4. ^ Paulapuro, Hannu (2000). "1". Paper and Board grades. Papermaking Science and Technology 18. Finland: Fapet Oy. pp. 38–39.  
  5. ^ Khwaldia, Khaoula; Elmira Arab-Tehrany; Stephane Desobry (2010). "Biopolymer Coatings on Paper Packaging Materials". Comprehensive Reviews in Food Science and Food Safety 9 (1): 82–91. Retrieved 9 Mar 2015. 

Further reading

  • Soroka, W, "Fundamentals of Packaging Technology", IoPP, 2002, ISBN 1-930268-25-4
  • Yam, K. L., "Encyclopedia of Packaging Technology", John Wiley & Sons, 2009, ISBN 978-0-470-08704-6


This article was sourced from Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. World Heritage Encyclopedia content is assembled from numerous content providers, Open Access Publishing, and in compliance with The Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR), Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., Public Library of Science, The Encyclopedia of Life, Open Book Publishers (OBP), PubMed, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and USA.gov, which sources content from all federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial government publication portals (.gov, .mil, .edu). Funding for USA.gov and content contributors is made possible from the U.S. Congress, E-Government Act of 2002.
 
Crowd sourced content that is contributed to World Heritage Encyclopedia is peer reviewed and edited by our editorial staff to ensure quality scholarly research articles.
 
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. World Heritage Encyclopedia™ is a registered trademark of the World Public Library Association, a non-profit organization.
 


Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from Project Gutenberg are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.