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Code point

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Code point

In character encoding terminology, a code point or code position is any of the numerical values that make up the code space.[1] Many code points represent single characters but they can also have other meanings, such as for formatting.

For example, the character encoding scheme ASCII comprises 128 code points in the range 0hex to 7Fhex, Extended ASCII comprises 256 code points in the range 0hex to FFhex, and Unicode comprises 1,114,112 code points in the range 0hex to 10FFFFhex. The Unicode code space is divided into seventeen planes (the basic multilingual plane, and 16 supplementary planes), each with 65,536 (= 216) code points. Thus the total size of the Unicode code space is 17 × 65,536 = 1,114,112.

Definition

The notion of a code point is used for abstraction, to distinguish both:

  • the number from an encoding as a sequence of bits, and
  • the abstract character from a particular graphical representation (glyph).

This is because one may wish to make these distinctions:

  • encode a particular code space in different ways, or
  • display a character via different glyphs.

For Unicode, the particular sequence of bits is called a code unit – for the UCS-4 encoding, any code point is encoded as 4-byte (octet) binary numbers, while in the UTF-8 encoding, different code points are encoded as sequences from one to four bytes long, forming a self-synchronizing code. See comparison of Unicode encodings for details. Code points are normally assigned to abstract characters. An abstract character is not a graphical glyph but a unit of textual data. However code points may also be left reserved for future assignment (most of the Unicode code space is unassigned), or given other designated functions.

The distinction between a code point and the corresponding abstract character is not pronounced in Unicode, but is evident for many other encoding schemes, where numerous code pages may exist for a single code space.

See also

Notes

  1. ^ Glossary of Unicode Terms

External links

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