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Connacht–Ulster (European Parliament constituency)

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Subject: County Donegal, Connacht, Dana Rosemary Scallon, Neil Blaney, Ray MacSharry, County Cavan, European Parliament election, 2004 (Ireland), Marian Harkin, List of members of the European Parliament for Ireland, 1994–99, Caoimhghín Ó Caoláin
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Connacht–Ulster (European Parliament constituency)

Connacht–Ulster was a constituency of the European Parliament in Ireland between 1979 and 2004. It elected 3 Members of the European Parliament (MEPs) using the single transferable vote form of proportional representation (PR-STV).

History and boundaries

The constituency was created in 1979 for the first direct elections to the European Parliament. It comprised the counties of Galway, Leitrim, Mayo, Roscommon and Sligo from the historic province of Connacht together with the Ulster counties of Donegal, Cavan, and Monaghan.[1] It was abolished under the European Parliament Elections (Amendment) Act 2004 and succeeded by the new North-West constituency.[2]

MEPs

Members of the European Parliament (MEPs) for Connacht–Ulster 1979–2009
Parl. Election Member
(Party)
Member
(Party)
Member
(Party)
1st 1979[3] Neil Blaney
(IFF)
Seán Flanagan
(FF)
Joe McCartin
(FG)
2nd 1984[4] Ray MacSharry
(FF)
1987[5] Mark Killilea
(FF)
3rd 1989[6] Neil Blaney
(IFF)
4th 1994[7] Pat the Cope Gallagher
(FF)
5th 1999[8] Dana Rosemary Scallon
(Ind)
2002[9] Seán Ó Neachtain
(FF)
6th 2004 Constituency abolished. See North-West
Note: The columns in this table are used only for presentational purposes, and no significance should be attached to the order of columns. For details of the order in which seats were won at each election, see the detailed results of that election.

1999 election

1999 European Parliament election: Connacht–Ulster[8]
Party Candidate % 1st Pref Count 1 Count 2 Count 3 Count 4 Count 5 Count 6
Fianna Fáil Pat the Cope Gallagher[9] 20.6 66,055 66,381 66,902 72,673 98,258  
Fine Gael Joe McCartin 19.9 63,632 63,811 64,506 68,388 72,764 75,275
Independent Dana Rosemary Scallon 16.0 51,086 51,366 52,802 59,444 67,887 72,855
Independent Marian Harkin 14.8 47,372 47,712 48,632 56,141 60,316 64,152
Fianna Fáil Noel Treacy 15.0 47,933 48,060 48,470 51,544    
Sinn Féin Seán MacManus 6.4 20,457 20,571 20,801      
Labour Party Gerard Gibbons 3.3 10,522 10,827 10,972      
Independent Luke 'Ming' Flanagan 1.6 5,000 5,539 5,650      
Independent Liam Sharkey 1.7 5,334 5,404        
Natural Law Paul Campbell 0.6 1,920          
Independent Paul Raymond 0.3 840          
Electorate: 541,552   Valid: 320,151   Spoilt: 12,085 (3.6%)   Quota: 80,038   Turnout: 332,236 (61.4%)

Mark Killilea retired and his seat was gained by Independent Dana Rosemary Scallon.

1994 election

1994 European Parliament election: Connacht–Ulster[7]
Party Candidate 1st Pref % Seat Count
Fianna Fáil Pat the Cope Gallagher 53,171 22.9 1 4
Fianna Fáil Mark Killilea 45,638 19.6 2 5
Fine Gael Joe McCartin 38,039 16.4 3 5
Fine Gael Jim Higgins 30,947 13.3
Labour Party Ann Gallagher 19,826 8.5
Progressive Democrats Bobby Molloy 21,219 9.1
Sinn Féin Pat Doherty 13,939 6.0
Green Party Richard Douthwaite 8,628 3.7
Natural Law Mary Louise Lacey 1,223 0.5
Electorate: 496,352   Valid: 232,630   Spoilt: 4,971 (2.1%)   Quota: 58,158   Turnout: 237,601 (47.9%)

Pat the Cope Gallagher of Fianna Fáil gained the seat vacated by Neil Blaney.

1989 election

1989 European Parliament election: Connacht–Ulster[6]
Party Candidate 1st Pref % Seat Count
Fine Gael Joe McCartin 46,523 14.9 1 9
Independent Fianna Fáil Neil Blaney 52,852 16.9 2 9
Fianna Fáil Mark Killilea 53,842 17.2 3 9
Fianna Fáil Seán Doherty 48,288 15.5
Progressive Democrats Bobby Molloy 40,476 13.0
Fine Gael Paddy Harte 30,745 9.8
Fine Gael Angela Lupton 10,165 3.3
Sinn Féin Pat Doherty 7,716 2.5
Workers' Party Jimmy Brick 6,173 2.0
Sinn Féin Caoimhghín Ó Caoláin 4,969 1.6
Labour Party Ivan McPhillips 4,759 1.5
Workers' Party Seamus Rodgers 4,097 1.3
Sinn Féin Dermot Guy 1,697 0.5
Electorate: 464,661   Valid: 312,302   Spoilt: 10,362 (3.2%)   Quota: 78,076   Turnout: 322,664 (69.4%)

Neil Blaney regained his seat at the expense of Fianna Fáil.

1984 election

1984 European Parliament election: Connacht–Ulster[4]
Party Candidate 1st Pref % Seat Count
Fianna Fáil Ray MacSharry[5] 56,803 24.1 1 7
Fine Gael Joe McCartin 51,164 21.7 2 8
Fianna Fáil Seán Flanagan 40,760 17.3 3 9
Independent Fianna Fáil Neil Blaney 32,504 13.8
Fine Gael Joseph Murrin 20,107 8.5
Sinn Féin Caoimhghín Ó Caoláin 6,103 2.6
Labour Party Michael D. Higgins 8,337 3.5
Fine Gael Pól Ó Foighil 7,144 3.0
Sinn Féin Eddie Fullerton 5,771 2.5
Sinn Féin Mary McGing 4,176 1.8
Workers' Party Jimmy Brick 2,612 1.1
Electorate: 471,577   Valid: 235,481   Spoilt: 5,763 (2.4%)   Quota: 58,871   Turnout: 241,244 (51.2%)

Neil Blaney lost his seat to Ray MacSharry of Fianna Fáil.

1979 election

1979 European Parliament election: Connacht–Ulster[3]
Party Candidate 1st Pref % Seat Count
Independent Fianna Fáil Neil Blaney 81,522 26.6 1 1
Fianna Fáil Seán Flanagan 38,233 12.5 2 7
Fine Gael Joe McCartin 47,519 15.5 3 7
Fine Gael Patrick Cooney 33,360 10.9
Fianna Fáil Jim Doolan 27,739 9.1
Fine Gael Myles Staunton 32,485 10.6
Fianna Fáil Sean McEniff 25,774 8.4
Labour Party Michael D. Higgins 13,062 4.3
Sinn Féin (Workers' Party) Tony Coffey 3,329 1.1
Sinn Féin (Workers' Party) Séamus Rodgers 2,696 0.9
Independent Christopher Morris 447 0.2
Electorate: 442,471   Valid: 306,166   Spoilt: 14,547 (4.5%)   Quota: 76,542   Turnout: 320,713 (72.5%)

See also

References

  1. ^ "European Assembly Elections Act, 1977: Schedule (Constituencies)". Irish Statute Book database. Retrieved 22 November 2011. 
  2. ^ "European Parliament Elections (Amendment) Act 2004: Schedule (Constituencies)". Irish Statute Book database. Retrieved 22 November 2011. 
  3. ^ a b "1979 European Parliament election result – Connacht–Ulster constituency". ElectionsIreland.org. Retrieved 22 March 2009. 
  4. ^ a b "1984 European Parliament election result – Connacht–Ulster constituency". ElectionsIreland.org. Retrieved 22 March 2009. 
  5. ^ a b Ray MacSharry resigned on 10 March 1987 and was substituted by Mark Killilea (FF / EDA) on 24 March 1987.
  6. ^ a b "1989 European Parliament election result – Connacht–Ulster constituency". ElectionsIreland.org. Retrieved 22 March 2009. 
  7. ^ a b "1994 European Parliament election result – Connacht–Ulster constituency". ElectionsIreland.org. Retrieved 22 March 2009. 
  8. ^ a b "1999 European Parliament election result – Connacht–Ulster constituency". ElectionsIreland.org. Retrieved 22 March 2009. 
  9. ^ a b Pat the Cope Gallagher was substituted by Seán Ó Neachtain (FF / UEN) on 2 July 2002, following the 2002 general election.

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