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Constituencies of Namibia

This article is part of a series on the
politics and government of
Namibia
Foreign relations

Each of the 14 regions in Namibia is further subdivided into electoral constituencies. The size of the constituencies varies with the size and population of each region. There are currently 121 constituencies in Namibia. The most populous constituency is Walvis Bay Urban in the Erongo region; the least populous is Walvis Bay Rural.[1]

The administrative division of Namibia is tabled by Delimitation Commissions and accepted or declined by the National Assembly. In 1992, the First Delimitation Commission chaired by Judge President Johan Strydom determined the number of constituencies to be 95. Since then, every Delimitation Commission has increased this number to accommodate population growth.[2] The fourth Delimitation Commission increased the number of constituencies to its present number in 2013.[3]

Regional councillors are directly elected through secret ballots (regional elections) by the inhabitants of their constituencies.[4]

List of constituencies by region

Zambezi
Map of Namibia with the region highlighted

Kabbe
Katima Mulilo Rural
Katima Mulilo Urban
Kongola
Linyanti
Sibinda
Judea Lyaboloma
Kabbe South
Erongo
Map of Namibia with the region highlighted

Arandis
Dâures
Karibib
Omaruru
Swakopmund
Walvis Bay Rural
Walvis Bay Urban
Hardap
Map of Namibia with the region highlighted

Gibeon
Mariental Rural
Mariental Urban
Rehoboth Rural
Rehoboth East Urban
Rehoboth West Urban
Aranos
Daweb
ǁKaras
Map of Namibia with the region highlighted

Berseba
Karasburg
Keetmanshoop Rural
Keetmanshoop Urban
ǃNamiǂNûs
Oranjemund
Karasburg West
Kavango East
Map of Namibia with the region highlighted

Mashare
Mukwe
Ndiyona
Rundu Rural East
Rundu Rural West
Rundu Urban
Ndonga Linena
Kavango West
Map of Namibia with the region highlighted

Kapako
Mpungu
Musese
Ncuncuni
Mankumpi
Ncamangoro
Nkurenkuru
Tondoro
Khomas
Map of Namibia with the region highlighted

John Pandeni
Katutura Central
Katutura East
Khomasdal North
Moses ǁGaroëb
Samora Machel
Tobias Hainyeko
Windhoek West
Windhoek East
Windhoek Rural
Kunene
Map of Namibia with the region highlighted

Epupa
Kamanjab
Khorixas
Opuwo
Outjo
Sesfontein
Ohangwena
Map of Namibia with the region highlighted

Eenhana
Endola
Engela
Epembe
Ohangwena
Okongo
Omundaungilo
Ondobe
Ongenga
Oshikango
Oshikunde
Omaheke
Map of Namibia with the region highlighted

Aminuis
Epukiro
Gobabis
Kalahari
Otjinene
Otjombinde
Steinhausen
Omusati
Map of Namibia with the region highlighted

Anamulenge
Elim
Etayi
Ogongo
Okahao
Okalongo
Onesi
Oshikuku
Otamanzi
Outapi
Ruacana
Tsandi
Oshana
Map of Namibia with the region highlighted

Okaku
Okatana
Okatyali
Ompundja
Ondangwa
Ongwediva
Oshakati East
Oshakati West
Uukwiyu
Uuvudhiya
Ondangwa Urban
Oshikoto
Map of Namibia with the region highlighted

Eengodi
Guinas
Okankolo
Olukonda
Omuntele
Omuthiyagwiipundi
Onayena
Oniipa
Onyaanya
Tsumeb
Nehale lyaMpingana
Otjozondjupa
Map of Namibia with the region highlighted

Grootfontein
Okahandja
Okakarara
Omatako
Otavi
Otjiwarongo
Tsumkwe

References

  1. ^ Constituencies of Namibia, 2004
  2. ^ Matundu-Tjiparuro, Mae (28 February 2011). "Khomas Region, a constitutional, political and geographical hybrid". Focus on: Khomas Region. supplement to  
  3. ^ Shinovene Immanuel. "Caprivi is no more". The Namibian. 9 August 2013. Retrieved 1 September 2013.
  4. ^ "Namibia National Council".  
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