World Library  
Flag as Inappropriate
Email this Article

Corsetmaker

Article Id: WHEBN0000951933
Reproduction Date:

Title: Corsetmaker  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Language: English
Subject: Corset, History of corsets, Corsage (bodice), Bondage corset, Spirella
Collection: Artisans, Corsetry
Publisher: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Publication
Date:
 

Corsetmaker

Corsetiers cutting out and fitting in the 18th century

A corsetmaker is a specialist tailor who makes corsets. Corsetmakers are frequently known by the French equivalent terms corsetier (male) and corsetière (female). Stay-maker is an obsolete name for a corsetmaker. The word corset replaced the word stays after the Great Exhibition in 1851, because a prizewinning type of French stay was called the Hygienic Corset.[1]

The best corsetmakers are highly skilled tailors with a knowledge of anatomy that enables them to make well-fitting, long-lasting corsets. Corsetmakers who reproduce historical styles must be familiar with historical fashions and costumes that span centuries of history.

Individual corsetmakers often favour a certain style, and frequently have differing theories and opinions about the physical impact and benefits of various corsets, thereby influencing their corset design and creation.

Contents

  • Famous corsetmakers 1
  • Travelling corsetiers 2
  • Considerations 3
  • See also 4
  • References 5
  • Books 6

Famous corsetmakers

Travelling corsetiers

Some companies had travelling saleswomen, corsetières who order the tailored corsets from the company. Well-known are Spirella (1904–1989), Barcley , and Spenser .

Considerations

Corsetiers cutting out in 1928.

The main consideration of corset design is duration of use. For short-term use, e.g. used for a special event such as a wedding, a corset will be worn briefly and so is not subject to wear, therefore need not be of the highest quality of construction. For long-term use, e.g., by tightlacing or waist training, corsets must be made to exact standards and are best custom-fitted and designed for the individual wearer. Single weakness or flaws tend to be visible. Some custom-made gowns have corsets built into the design; a talented dressmaker may also be a skilled corset-maker.

See also

References

  1. ^ our Hygienic Corset, it is either pirated or attempted by almost every staymaker in London and Paris
  2. ^ MADAME CAPLIN'S INVENTIONS FOR THE ADAPTATION OF THE DRESS TO THE BODY; THE PRESERVATION OF HEALTH; The Cure of Deformity, and the Display of Beauty.
  3. ^ http://www.americanheritage.com/articles/magazine/it/1992/1/1992_1_22.shtml
  4. ^ Most prolific women inventors - 1790-1895

Books

  • Doyle R. (1997)Waisted Efforts, An Illustrated Guide To Corset Making. Nova Scotia, Sartorial Press Publications, ISBN 0-9683039-0-0
  • Mary Brooks Picken, 1920Tight Linings and Boning
  • Mme Ruth A. Rosenfeld 1933The Practical Corsetiere
  • The Basics Of Corset Building, A Handbook For Beginners by Linda Sparks (Author) ISBN 0-9737358-0-5
  • Caplin - Health and Beauty (1864)
This article was sourced from Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. World Heritage Encyclopedia content is assembled from numerous content providers, Open Access Publishing, and in compliance with The Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR), Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., Public Library of Science, The Encyclopedia of Life, Open Book Publishers (OBP), PubMed, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and USA.gov, which sources content from all federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial government publication portals (.gov, .mil, .edu). Funding for USA.gov and content contributors is made possible from the U.S. Congress, E-Government Act of 2002.
 
Crowd sourced content that is contributed to World Heritage Encyclopedia is peer reviewed and edited by our editorial staff to ensure quality scholarly research articles.
 
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. World Heritage Encyclopedia™ is a registered trademark of the World Public Library Association, a non-profit organization.
 


Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from Project Gutenberg are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.