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Crime in the Czech Republic

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Title: Crime in the Czech Republic  
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Subject: Law enforcement in the Czech Republic, Crime in the Czech Republic, Ministry of the Interior (Czech Republic), Crime in Bulgaria, Crime in Romania
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Crime in the Czech Republic

Crime in the Czech Republic is combated by the Czech Police and other agencies.

Contents

  • General 1
    • Roma people 1.1
  • Crime by type 2
    • Corruption 2.1
  • See also 3
  • References 4

General

In 2009, there were approximately 330,000 crimes committed in the Czech Republic.[1] The number of murders fell from 202 in 2008 to 181 in 2009.[1] The U.S. Department of State rates the Czech Republic as a ‘low’ crime threat location.[2]

Car thefts and break-ins are common in the Czech Republic, especially in major cities.[2] Pick pocketing is a large problem in the Czech Republic, particularly in crowded tourist spots.[2]

Roma people

Romanis make 2-3% of population in the Czech Republic. According to Říčan (1998), Roma make up more than 60% of Czech prisoners and about 20-30% earn their livelihood in illegal ways, such as prostitution, trafficking and other property crimes.[3]

Crime by type

Corruption

Political corruption (especially bribery) and theft are one of the most severe issues in the Czech Republic.[4][5][6][7][8] Group of States Against Corruption mainly criticises the lack of pro-active monitoring of the financing and states that an effective supervisory mechanism is missing.[6]

A survey of Transparency International in 2009 showed that fewer than 1 in 10 respondents find the anti-corruption efforts of their government effective.[9] In 2010, 44% of people answered that the corruption increased.[9][10]

See also

References

  1. ^ a b http://en.rian.ru/world/20100130/157726302.html
  2. ^ a b c https://www.osac.gov/Pages/ContentReportPDF.aspx?cid=10583
  3. ^ Říčan, Pavel (1998). S Romy žít budeme - jde o to jak : dějiny, současná situace, kořeny problémů, naděje společné budoucnosti. Praha: Portál. pp. 58–63.  
  4. ^ "Czech Republic ranks among Europe's most corrupt: Studies show theft and graft are on the rise (November 2009)". Prague Post. Retrieved 2011-09-11. 
  5. ^ Green, Peter S. (2003-06-13). "World Briefing | Europe: Czech Republic: Bribery On Jet Deal Alleged". The New York Times. Retrieved 2011-09-11. 
  6. ^ a b "Group of States Against Corruption publishes report on the Czech Republic". Council of Europe. Retrieved 2011-09-11. 
  7. ^ "Anti-corruption police shelve another case: Tůmová investigation closed despite leaked video showing bribery (July 2011)". The Prague Post. Retrieved 2011-09-11. 
  8. ^ "Playing the corruption game in the Czech Republic (2011)". DW-World.de. Retrieved 2011-09-11. 
  9. ^ a b "Global Corruption Barometer 2009". Transparency International. Retrieved 2011-09-11. 
  10. ^ Glennie, Jonathan; Sedghi, Ami (2010-12-09). "Corruption index: global bribery and corruption worldwide ranked by Transparency International". London: Transparency International, Guardian. Retrieved 2011-09-11. 
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