David Foster Wallace bibliography

David Foster Wallace giving a reading in San Francisco in 2006.

David Foster Wallace (1962–2008) was an American author of novels, essays, and short stories, and a professor at Pomona College in Claremont, California.

Fiction

Novels

Short story collections

Short fiction

  • 1984: "The Planet Trillaphon As It Stands In Relation to The Bad Thing", Amherst Review
    • 2009: republished in Tin House
  • 1985: "Mr. Costigan in May", Clarion
    • 1987: included in BOTS
  • 1987: "Lyndon", Arrival
    • 1989: included in GWCH
  • 1987: "Here and There", Fiction
    • 1989: included in GWCH
  • 1987: "Other Math", Western Humanities Review
  • 1987: "Say Never", Florida Review
    • 1989: included in GWCH
  • 1987: "Solomon Silverfish", Sonora Review
  • 1988: "John Billy", Conjunctions[1]
    • 1989: included in GWCH
  • 1988: "Late Night", Playboy
    • 1989: included in GWCH as "My Appearance"
  • 1988: "Everything is Green", Puerto del Sol
    • 1989: reprinted in Harper's
    • 1989: included in GWCH
  • 1988: "Little Expressionless Animals", Paris Review
    • 1989: included in GWCH
  • 1989: "Crash of 69", Between C&D
  • 1989: "Luckily the Account Representative Knew CPR" in GWCH
  • 1989: "Girl with Curious Hair" in GWCH
  • 1989: "Westward the Course of Empire Takes Its Way" in GWCH
  • 1991: "Church Not Made With Hands", Rampike
    • 1999: included in BIHM
  • 1991: "Forever Overhead", Fiction International
    • 1999: reprinted in BIHM
  • 1991: "Order and Flux in Northampton", Conjunctions
  • 1992: "Rabbit Resurrected", Harper's
  • 1993: "The Awakening of My Interest in Annular Systems", Harper’s
  • 1994 "Several Birds", The New Yorker
  • 1995 "An Interval", The New Yorker
  • 1997: "Death Is Not The End", Grand Street
    • 1999: reprinted (extended) in BIHM
  • 1998: "A Radically Condensed History of Postindustrial Life", Ploughshares, Spring 1998[2]
    • 1999: reprinted (slightly extended) in BIHM
  • 1998: "Brief Interviews with Hideous Men", Harper's
    • 1999: reprinted (extended, but with interview 16 omitted) in BIHM
  • 1999: "Asset", The New Yorker
  • 2002: "Peoria (4)", TriQuarterly #112
  • 2002: "Peoria (9)", TriQuarterly #112
  • 2007: "Good People", The New Yorker
  • 2008: "The Compliance Branch", Harper’s
  • 2009 "Wiggle Room", The New Yorker
  • 2009 "All That", The New Yorker
  • 2010 "A New Examiner," Harper’s
  • 2011 "Backbone", The New Yorker
  • 2013 "The Awakening of My Interest in Advanced Tax", Madra Press

Nonfiction

Dates for entries in collections are the dates printed after the piece in the collection; the other dates are publication dates. Earliest dates are listed first; when they're the same the version in a collection is listed first, with the exception of Up, Simba! since the collected version references its magazine appearance and so was written afterward.

Collections

Other books

  • 2003: Everything and More: A Compact History of Infinity.
  • 2010: Fate, Time, and Language: An Essay on Free Will. Columbia University Press, 2010 [reprint]. ISBN 978-0231151573. This text is an anthology presenting, in full, Wallace's undergraduate honors thesis in Philosophy at Amherst, "Richard Taylor's 'Fatalism' and the Semantics of Physical Modality." Additional material in the volume includes James Ryerson's introductory essay: "A Head That Throbbed Heartlike: The Philosophical Mind of David Foster Wallace"; philosopher Jay Garfield's epilogue; and philosophical essays regarding Taylor's fatalist argument.

Essays

  • 1985: "Richard Taylor's 'Fatalism' and the Semantics of Physical Modality" (thesis)
    • 2010: Reprinted in Fate, Time, and Language: An Essay on Free Will (see above).
  • 1987: "Matters of Sense and Opacity", New York Times letter
  • 1988: "Fictional Futures and the Conspicuously Young" in The Review of Contemporary Fiction
    • 2012: Reprinted in Both Flesh and Not
  • 1990: Signifying Rappers: Rap and Race in the Urban Present (with Mark Costello)
  • 1990: "The Horror of Pretentiousness: 'The Great and Secret Show' by Clive Barker ", in The Washington Post
  • 1990: "Michael Martone's Fort Wayne is Seventh on Hitler's List", in Harvard Book Review
  • 1990: "The Empty Plenum: David Markson's Wittgenstein's Mistress" in The Review of Contemporary Fiction
    • 2012: Reprinted in Both Flesh and Not
  • 1991: "Exploring Inner Space: War Fever by J.G. Ballard", in The Washington Post
  • 1991: "The Million-Dollar Tattoo: Laura's Skin by F.J. Fiederspiel", in New York Times Book Review
  • 1991: "Tragic Cuban Emigre and a Tale of 'The Door to Happiness':The Doorman by Reinaldo Arenas", in The Philadelphia Inquirer Book Review
  • 1991: "Presley as Paradigm: Dead Elvis: A Chronicle of Cultural Obsession by Greil Marcus", Los Angeles Times
  • 1992: "Kathy Acker’s Portrait of an Eye: Three Novels", in Harvard Review
  • 1992: "Iris' Story: An Inversion of Philosophic Skepticism: The Blindfold by Siri Hustvedt", in The Philadelphia Inquirer
    • 1992: reprinted in Contemporary Literary Criticism (vol. 76)
  • 1992: "Tracy Austin's 'Beyond Center Court: My Story'", The Philadelphia Inquirer
  • 1990: "Derivative Sport in Tornado Alley", ASFTINDA
    • 1992: published (abbreviated) as "Tennis, Trigonometry, Tornadoes: A Midwestern Boyhood" in Harper's
  • 1990: "E Unibus Pluram: Television and U.S. Fiction", ASFTINDA
    • 1993: published (lightly edited and sans footnotes) in Review of Contemporary Fiction
  • 1993: "Getting Away from Already Being Pretty Much Away from It All", ASFTINDA
    • 1994: published as "Ticket to the Fair" in Harper's
  • 1992: "Greatly Exaggerated", ASFTINDA
    • 1992: published as "Morte d'Author: An Autopsy" in the Harvard Book Review
  • 1996: "God Bless You, Mr. Franzen", Harper's letter[3]
  • 1994: "Mr. Cogito" in Spin
    • 2012: Reprinted in Both Flesh and Not
  • 1996: "Democracy and Commerce at the US Open" in Tennis (included with NYTM)
    • 2012: Reprinted in Both Flesh and Not
  • 1996: "Impediments to Passion" in Might Magazine
    • 1998: reprinted as "Hail The Returning Dragon, Clothed In New Fire" in Shiny Adidas Tracksuits and the Death of Camp and Other Essays from Might Magazine
    • 2012: Reprinted in Both Flesh and Not as "Back in New Fire"
  • 1996: "Quo Vadis – Introduction", Review of Contemporary Fiction
  • 1995: "David Lynch Keeps His Head", ASFTINDA
    • 1996: published (severely abbreviated) in Premiere
  • 1995: "Tennis Player Michael Joyce's Professional Artistry as a Paradigm of Certain Stuff about Choice, Freedom, Discipline, Joy, Grotesquerie, and Human Completeness", ASFTINDA
    • 1996: published as "The String Theory" in Esquire
  • 1995: "A Supposedly Fun Thing I'll Never Do Again", ASFTINDA
    • 1996: published as "Shipping Out: On the (nearly lethal) comforts of a luxury cruise" in Harper's
  • 1996: "Joseph Frank's Dostoevsky", CTL
    • 1996: published as "Feodor's Guide" in Voice Literary Supplement (book review)
  • 1997: A Supposedly Fun Thing I'll Never Do Again
  • 1997: "Twilight of the Great Literary Beasts: John Updike, Champion Literary Phallocrat, Drops One; Is This Finally the End for the Magnificent Narcissist?", New York Observer book review
    • 1998: reprinted (edited) in CTL as "Certainly the End of Something or Other, One Would Sort of Have to Think: (Re John Updike's Towards the End of Time)"
  • 1998: "Big Red Son", CTL
    • 1998: published (abbreviated and bowdlerized) as "Neither Adult Nor Entertainment" in Premiere under the names Willem R. deGroot and Matt Rundlet
  • 1998: "The Nature of the Fun" in Fiction Writer
    • 1998: published in Why I Write: Thoughts on the Craft of Fiction (Will Blythe, ed.)
    • 2012: Reprinted in Both Flesh and Not
  • 1998: "F/X Porn" in Waterstone's Magazine
    • 2012: Reprinted in Both Flesh and Not as "The (As It Were) Seminal Importance of Terminator 2"
  • 1998: "Laughing with Kafka", Harper's
    • 1999: reprinted (with different footnotes) in CTL as "Some Remarks on Kafka's Funniness from Which Probably Not Enough Has Been Removed"
  • 1999: "Overlooked: Five Direly Underappreciated U.S. Novels >1960" in Salon
    • 2012: Reprinted in Both Flesh and Not
  • 1999: "100-word statement", Rolling Stone
  • 2000: "Rhetoric and the Math Melodrama" (heavily edited) in Science
      • 2000: response to letter in response
      • 2012: Reprinted in Both Flesh and Not
  • 2000: "The Weasel, Twelve Monkeys, and the Shrub", Rolling Stone
    • 2000: reprinted (greatly expanded and with a preface) as Up, Simba!: 7 Days on the Trail of an Anticandidate
    • 2005: reprinted (verbatim) in Consider the Lobster
    • 2008: reprinted (with a foreword by Jacob Weisberg) as McCain's Promise: Aboard the Straight Talk Express with John McCain and a Whole Bunch of Actual Reporters, Thinking About Hope
  • 1999: "Authority and American Usage (or, 'Politics and the English Language' is Redundant)" in CTL
    • 2001: published (revised and abbreviated) as "Tense Present: Democracy, English and the wars over usage"
  • 2001: "The Best of the Prose Poem" in Rain Taxi
    • 2012: Reprinted in Both Flesh and Not
  • 2001: "The View from Mrs. Thompson's", CTL
    • 2001: "9/11: The View From the Midwest" appeared in Rolling Stone, October 25, 2001 (also published online by Rolling Stone with the first title)
  • 2004: "Twenty-Four Word Notes" printed as "Word Note" (various) in Oxford American Writer's Thesauraus
    • 2012: Reprinted in Both Flesh and Not
  • 2004: "Borges on the Couch" in the New York Times Book Review
    • See also: author's reply
      • 2012: Reprinted in Both Flesh and Not
  • 2004: "Consider the Lobster", CTL
    • 2004: published (with slight edits and gruesome details removed) in Gourmet
  • 2005: "Kenyon Commencement Address"
    • 2006: reprinted (revised and edited) in The Best American Nonrequired Reading 2006
    • 2008: reprinted (severely abridged) in Wall Street Journal as "David Foster Wallace on Life and Work"
    • 2009: reprinted as This Is Water
  • 2005: "Host", CTL
    • 2005: published (abbreviated and in color) in The Atlantic
  • 2006: "Federer as Religious Experience", NYTM: PLAY
    • 2012: Reprinted in Both Flesh and Not as "Federer Both Flesh and Not"
  • 2007: "Deciderization 2007 — a Special Report" published as introduction to The Best American Essays 2007
    • 2012: Reprinted in Both Flesh and Not
  • 2007: "Just Asking", in The Atlantic
    • 2012: Reprinted in Both Flesh and Not
  • 2008: "It All Gets Quite Tricky", Harper's [4]

Contributions

  • Fiction International 19:2 (Aids Art, Photomontages from Germany and England) (1991), contributing author
  • Grand Street 42 (1992), contributor
  • Grand Street 46 (1993), contributor
  • The Review of Contemporary Fiction: The Future of Fiction, A Forum Edited by David Foster Wallace (1996), editor
  • Open City Number Five : Change or Die (1997), contributing author
  • The Best American Essays 2007 (2007), guest editor
  • The New Kings of Nonfiction (2007), contributing author
  • The Mechanics' Institute Review, Issue 4 (September 2007)

Interviews

  • Becky Bradway, "Interview with David Foster Wallace." Creating Nonfiction. Ed. Becky Bradway and Doug Hesse. Boston: Bedford/St. Martin's, 2009, 770-73.
  • Larry McCaffery, "An Interview with David Foster Wallace." Review of Contemporary Fiction 13.2 (Summer 1993), 127–150. (text at Dalkey Archive Press website)
  • Laura Miller, "The Salon Interview: David Foster Wallace." Salon 9 (1996).[5]
  • "The Usage Wars." Radio interview with David Foster Wallace and Bryan A. Garner. The Connection (March 30, 2001). (full audio interview)
  • Caleb Crain, "Approaching Infinity: David Foster Wallace talks about writing novels, riding the Green Line, and his new book on higher math." Boston Globe. October 26, 2003.[6]
  • Michael Goldfarb, "David Foster Wallace." radio interview for The Connection (June 25, 2004). (full audio interview)
  • David Foster Wallace on Bookworm
  • Charlie Rose: An interview with David Foster Wallace March 27, 1997
  • Zachary Chouteau, "Infinite Zest: Words with the Singular David Foster Wallace." Complete interview done for Bookselling This Week, a publication of the American Bookseller's Association.[7]
  • Dave Eggers, "David Foster Wallace." The Believer. November 2003.[8]
  • "Brief Interview with a Five Draft Man." Interview with Stacey Schmeidel for Amherst Magazine. Spring 1999.[9]
  • A radio interview with David Foster Wallace Aired on the Lewis Burke Frumkes Radio Show in the spring of 1999.
  • 2010: Lipsky, David. Although of Course You End Up Becoming Yourself: A Road Trip with David Foster Wallace. New York: Broadway, 2010.
  • Wallace, David Foster. David Foster Wallace: The Last Interview: and Other Conversations. Melville House, 2012. ISBN 978-1612192062
  • Bryan A. Garner and David Foster Wallace. Quack This Way: David Foster Wallace & Bryan A. Garner talk language and writing. RosePen Books, 2013. ISBN 978-0-991-11810-6.

Works about David Foster Wallace

Books

  • Bolger, Robert K. and Korb, Scott (eds). Gesturing Toward Reality: David Foster Wallace and Philosophy. Bloomsbury Academic, 2014. ISBN 978-1441162656
  • Boswell, Marshall. Understanding David Foster Wallace. Columbia: University of South Carolina Press, 2003. ISBN 1-57003-517-2
  • Boswell, Marshall and Burn, Stephen, eds. A Companion to David Foster Wallace Studies. Palgrave Macmillan, 2013 (American Literature Readings in the Twenty-First Century). ISBN 9781137078346
  • Burn, Stephen. David Foster Wallace's Infinite Jest: A Reader's Guide. New York, London: Continuum, 2003. ISBN 0-8264-1477-X
  • Carlisle, Greg. Elegant Complexity: A Study of David Foster Wallace's Infinite Jest. Austin, TX: Sideshow Media Group Press, 2007. ISBN 978-0-9761465-3-7
  • Cohen, Samuel, and Konstantinou, Lee (eds.). The Legacy of David Foster Wallace. University of Iowa Press, 2012. ISBN 9781609381042
  • Dowling, William, and Bell, Robert. A Reader's Companion to Infinite Jest. Xlibris, 2004. ISBN 1-4134-8446-8
  • Hering, David, ed. Consider David Foster Wallace: Critical Essays. Austin, TX: Sideshow Media Group Press, 2010.
    • Kelly, Adam. "David Foster Wallace and the New Sincerity in American Fiction." Consider David Foster Wallace: Critical Essay. Ed. David Hering. Austin, TX: Sideshow Media Group Press, 2010. 131–46.
  • Lipsky, David. Although of Course You End Up Becoming Yourself: A Road Trip with David Foster Wallace. New York: Broadway, 2010. ISBN 978-0307592439
  • Max, D. T. Every Love Story is a Ghost Story: A Life of David Foster Wallace. New York: Viking, 2012.
  • Wallace, David Foster. David Foster Wallace: The Last Interview: and Other Conversations. Melville House, 2012. ISBN 978-1612192062

Academic articles and book chapters

  • Benzon, Kiki. "Darkness Legible, Unquiet Lines: Mood Disorders in the Fiction of David Foster Wallace." Creativity, Madness and Civilization. Ed. Richard Pine. Cambridge: Cambridge Scholars Press, 2007: 187–198.
  • Bresnan, Mark. "The Work of Play in David Foster Wallace's Infinite Jest." Critique: Studies in Contemporary Fiction 50:1 (2008), 51–68.
  • Burn, Stephen. "Generational Succession and a Source for the Title of David Foster Wallace's The Broom of the System." Notes on Contemporary Literature 33.2 (2003), 9–11.
  • Cioffi, Frank Louis. "An Anguish Becomes Thing: Narrative as Performance in David Foster Wallace's Infinite Jest." Narrative 8.2 (2000), 161–181.
  • Delfino, Andrew Steven. "Becoming the New Man in Post-Postmodernist Fiction: Portrayals of Masculinities in David Foster Wallace's Infinite Jest and Chuck Palahniuk's Fight Club. MA Thesis, Georgia State University.
  • Ewijk, Petrus van. "'I' and the 'Other': The relevance of Wittgenstein, Buber and Levinas for an understanding of AA's Recovery Program in David Foster Wallace's Infinite Jest." English Text Construction 2.1 (2009), 132–45.
  • Goerlandt, Iannis and Luc Herman. "David Foster Wallace." Post-war Literatures in English: A Lexicon of Contemporary Authors 56 (2004), 1–16; A1-2, B1-2.
  • Goerlandt, Iannis. "Fußnoten und Performativität bei David Foster Wallace. Fallstudien." Am Rande bemerkt. Anmerkungspraktiken in literarischen Texten. Ed. Bernhard Metz & Sabine Zubarik. Berlin: Kulturverlag Kadmos, 2008: 387–408.
  • Goerlandt, Iannis. "'Put the book down and slowly walk away': Irony and David Foster Wallace's Infinite Jest." Critique: Studies in Contemporary Fiction 47.3 (2006), 309–28.
  • Goerlandt, Iannis. "'Still steaming as its many arms extended': Pain in David Foster Wallace's Incarnations of Burned Children." Sprachkunst 37.2 (2006), 297–308.
  • Harris, Jan Ll. Addiction and the Societies of Control: David Foster Wallace's Infinite Jest, paper delivered at Figuring Addictions/Rethinking Consumption conference, Institute for Cultural Research, Lancaster University, April 4–5, 2002.
  • Holland, Mary K. "'The Art's Heart's Purpose': Braving the Narcissistic Loop of David Foster Wallace's Infinite Jest." Critique: Studies in Contemporary Fiction 47.3 (2006), 218–42.
  • Jacobs, Timothy. "The Brothers Incandenza: Translating Ideology in Fyodor Dostoevsky's The Brothers Karamazov and David Foster Wallace's Infinite Jest." Contemporary Literary Criticism Vol. 271. Ed. Jeffrey Hunter. New York: Gale, 2009. Also published in Texas Studies in Literature and Language 49.3 (2007), 265–92.
  • Jacobs, Timothy. "American Touchstone: The Idea of Order in Gerard Manley Hopkins and David Foster Wallace." Comparative Literature Studies 38.3 (2001), 215–31.
  • Kelly, Adam. "David Foster Wallace: the Death of the Author and the Birth of a Discipline." Irish Journal of American Studies Online 2 (2010).
  • Kelly, Adam. "Development Through Dialogue: David Foster Wallace and the Novel of Ideas." Studies in the Novel 44.3 (2012): 265–81.
  • LeClair, Tom. "The Prodigious Fiction of Richard Powers, William T. Vollmann, and David Foster Wallace." Critique: Studies in Contemporary Fiction 38.1 (1996), 12–37.
  • Morris, David. "Lived Time and Absolute Knowing: Habit and Addiction from Infinite Jest to the Phenomenology of Spirit." Clio: A Journal of Literature, History and the Philosophy of History 30 (2001), 375–415.
  • Nichols, Catherine. "Dialogizing Postmodern Carnival: David Foster Wallace's Infinite Jest". Critique: Studies in Contemporary Fiction 43.1 (2001), 3–16.
  • Rother, James. "Reading and Riding the Post-Scientific Wave. The Shorter Fiction of David Foster Wallace". Review of Contemporary Fiction 13.2 (1993), 216–234. ISBN 1-56478-123-2
  • Tysdal, Dan. "Inarticulation and the Figure of Enjoyment: Raymond Carver's Minimalism Meets David Foster Wallace's 'A Radically Condensed History of Postindustrial Life'". Wascana Review of Contemporary Poetry and Short Fiction 38.1 (2003), 66–83.

Book reviews and online essays

  • Benzon, Kiki. "Oblivion"Mister Squishy, c'est moi: David Foster Wallace's electronic book review (2004).
  • Esposito, Scott, et al. "Who Was David Foster Wallace? A Symposium on the Writing of David Foster Wallace". The Quarterly Conversation.
  • Harris, Michael. "Everything and More"A Sometimes Funny Book Supposedly about Infinity: A Review of . Notices of the AMS 51.6 (2004), 632–638.
  • Jacobs, Tim. "The Fight: Considering David Foster Wallace Considering You". Rain Taxi Review of Books. Online Edition, Part Two. Winter 2009.
  • Jacobs, Timothy. "David Foster Wallace's Infinite Jest." The Explicator 58.3 (2000), 172–75.
  • Jacobs, Timothy. "David Foster Wallace's The Broom of the System." Ed. Alan Hedblad. Beacham's Encyclopedia of Popular Fiction. Detroit: Gale Research Press, 2001, 41–50.
  • Kelly, Adam. "The Map and the Territory: Infinite Boston." The Millions (13 Aug 2013).
  • Mason, Wyatt. ]"Oblivion: Stories"Don't like it? You don't have to play [review of . London Review of Books 26.22 (2004).

Footnotes

  1. ^ http://www.conjunctions.com/conj12.htm
  2. ^ http://www.pshares.org/read/issue-detail.cfm?intIssueID=75
  3. ^ http://www.harpers.org/archive/1996/09/0008091
  4. ^ Harper's (subscription required)
  5. ^ "SALON Features: David Foster Wallace". 
  6. ^ Crain, Caleb (October 26, 2003). "Boston.com / News / Boston Globe / Ideas / Approaching infinity". The Boston Globe. 
  7. ^ "www.ptwi.com". 
  8. ^ "The Believer—Interview with David Foster Wallace". 
  9. ^ "Brief Interview with a Five Draft Man , Amherst College". Amherst.edu. Retrieved February 26, 2011. 

External links

  • Uncollected DFW, a complete bibliography
  • Harper'sVarious writings, (available without subscription)
  • [1]
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