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Dennis Thurman

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Dennis Thurman

Dennis Thurman
Buffalo Bills
Position:
Personal information
Date of birth: (1956-04-13) April 13, 1956
Place of birth: Los Angeles, California
Height: 5 ft 11 in (1.80 m)
Weight: 176 lb (80 kg)
Career information
High school: Santa Monica (CA)
College: USC
NFL draft: 1978 / Round: 11 / Pick: 306
Career history
As player:
As coach:
Career NFL statistics as of 1986
Interceptions: 36
INT return yards: 562
Touchdowns: 4
Stats at NFL.com
Stats at pro-football-reference.com

Dennis Lee Thurman (born April 13, 1956) is a retired American football cornerback in the National Football League (NFL). He is currently the defensive coordinator of the Buffalo Bills.

Contents

  • Early years 1
  • College career 2
  • Professional career 3
    • Dallas Cowboys 3.1
    • St. Louis Cardinals 3.2
  • Coaching career 4
  • References 5
  • External links 6

Early years

Thurman played high school football at Santa Monica High School where he was a quarterback and defensive back and was a part of three CIF Division I championship teams that combined to go 39-1-1. He is the older brother of Ulysses "Junior" Thurman who also attended Santa Monica High (1981) and went on to play college football at the University of Southern California and play in the National Football League (NFL).

College career

Thurman played college football at University of Southern California where he graduated in 1977 as a two-time All-America safety and flanker and was part of the 1974 National Champion team. Thurman played for John McKay and later for John Robinson and was teammates with Ronnie Lott while at USC while Lott was an underclassmen. Lott credits Thurman for his development as a player in his Pro Football Hall of Fame speech stating Thurman was someone who "helped me become a better football player."[1]

He was a member of the 1974 USC National Championship team and played on Trojan teams that won four bowl games (two Roses, a Liberty and a Bluebonnet).

In his Trojan career, he had 13 interceptions, returning two for touchdowns, and led the Pac-10 Conference in interceptions with eight in 1976. Thurman also had 169 career tackles, 11 pass deflections and four fumble recoveries. He was USC's MVP in 1977 and won USC's Defensive Player of the Year Award in 1977. He played in the 1978 Senior Bowl and was a 1977 Playboy Pre-Season All-American. He led USC in interceptions in 1976 (eight, tops in the Pac-8) and led USC in punt returns in 1976 (68 yards). Thurman is tied for sixth on USC's career interception list (13, including two intercepted fumbles).

Professional career

Dallas Cowboys

Thurman a fifth-year player from USC, was drafted by the Dallas Cowboys in the 11th round of the 1978 NFL Draft, and although his experience was at safety, he originally made the team as a cornerback. He played in Super Bowl XIII in 1979 and recovered an onside kick.

In 1980, he won the starting free safety position but his play was inconsistent.[2] The next year Charlie Waters retired and cornerback Benny Barnes, was moved to strong safety, so Thurman was pressed into starting at cornerback, registering 9 interceptions and making his only Pro Bowl.

Thurman had three interceptions, including a 39-yard return for touchdown to clinch a victory at Texas Stadium, in the 1982 NFL playoffs second round against the Green Bay Packers.[3]

During the 1985 season quarterback Danny White nicknamed Thurman along with fellow safety Michael Downs and cornerbacks Everson Walls, Ron Fellows, "Thurman's Thieves", for their opportunistic play in the secondary. He was waived on August 26, 1986.[4]

St. Louis Cardinals

On August 28, 1986, he was claimed off waivers by the St. Louis Cardinals, reuniting with head coach Gene Stallings who was his defensive secondary coach with the Cowboys.[5] He played safety and started three games. He was released on December 22.

Thurman never missed a game during his 137-game career and finished with 36 interceptions, which he returned for 562 yards and four touchdowns. He also recovered seven fumbles.

Coaching career

He made his NFL coaching debut with the Phoenix Cardinals, coaching defensive backs for two seasons (1988–89). He coached from 1993 to 2000 for his alma mater, the USC Trojans where he mentored future NFLers Chris Cash, Kris Richard, Daylon McCutcheon, Brian Kelly and Troy Polamalu.

Thurman was part of the Baltimore Ravens coaching staff from 2002 to 2008.

References

  1. ^ Lott, Ronnie; Roy Lott (July 29, 2000). "Ronnie Lott's Enshrinement Speech". Pro Football Hall of Fame. Archived from the original on August 16, 2011. Retrieved August 16, 2011. 
  2. ^ https://news.google.com/newspapers?nid=1291&dat=19810910&id=hAcyAAAAIBAJ&sjid=lY0DAAAAIBAJ&pg=4172,1916777&hl=en
  3. ^ https://news.google.com/newspapers?nid=1964&dat=19830117&id=cqlUAAAAIBAJ&sjid=lDsNAAAAIBAJ&pg=5816,4949769&hl=en
  4. ^ https://news.google.com/newspapers?nid=1320&dat=19860929&id=YD1WAAAAIBAJ&sjid=7OkDAAAAIBAJ&pg=4955,4051068&hl=en
  5. ^ https://news.google.com/newspapers?nid=266&dat=19860822&id=ef4rAAAAIBAJ&sjid=Vm0FAAAAIBAJ&pg=5894,7433687&hl=en

External links

  • Buffalo Bills profile
  • USC profile
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