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Dermis

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Title: Dermis  
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Dermis

Dermis
The distribution of the bloodvessels in the skin of the sole of the foot. (Corium - TA alternate term for dermis - is labeled at upper right.)
A diagrammatic sectional view of the skin (click on image to magnify). (Dermis labeled at center right.)
Identifiers
MeSH A17.815.180
Code TH H3.12.00.1.03001
Dorlands
/Elsevier
Skin
Anatomical terminology
A graphic representation of the interface between skin epithelium and the underlying connective tissue the reticular dermis.

The dermis is a layer of skin between the epidermis (with which it makes up the cutis) and subcutaneous tissues, that consists of connective tissue and cushions the body from stress and strain. It is divided into two layers, the superficial area adjacent to the epidermis called the papillary region and a deep thicker area known as the reticular dermis.[1] The dermis is tightly connected to the epidermis through a basement membrane. Structural components of the dermis are collagen, elastic fibers, and extrafibrillar matrix.[2] It also contains Mechanoreceptors that provide the sense of touch and thermoreceptors that provide the sense of heat. In addition, hair follicles, sweat glands, sebaceous glands, apocrine glands, lymphatic vessels and blood vessels are present in the dermis. Those blood vessels provide nourishment and waste removal for both dermal and epidermal cells.

Contents

  • Components of the dermis 1
  • Layers 2
    • Stratum papillare 2.1
    • Reticular Layer 2.2
  • Additional images 3
  • See also 4
  • References 5

Components of the dermis

The dermis is composed of three major types of cells:[3] fibroblasts, macrophages, and adipocytes.

Apart from these cells, the dermis is also composed of matrix components such as collagen (which provides strength), elastin (which provides elasticity), and extrafibrillar matrix, an extracellular gel-like substance primarily composed of glycosaminoglycans (most notably hyaluronan), proteoglycans, and glycoproteins.[3]

Layers

Stratum papillare

The papillary region is composed of loose areolar connective tissue. This is named for its fingerlike projections called papillae, that extend toward the epidermis and contain either terminal networks of blood capillaries or tactile Meissner's corpuscles.[4]

Reticular Layer

A fluorescent section of blood vessels in the skin; the smooth muscle walls of the blood vessels are brightly stained.

The reticular region lies under the papillary region and is usually much thicker. It is composed of dense irregular connective tissue, and receives its name from the dense concentration of collagenous, elastic, and reticular fibers that weave throughout it. These protein fibers give the dermis its properties of strength, extensibility, and elasticity. Within the reticular region are the roots of the hair, sebaceous glands, sweat glands, receptors, nails, and blood vessels.

Additional images

See also

References

  1. ^ James, William; Berger, Timothy; Elston, Dirk (2005). Andrews' Diseases of the Skin: Clinical Dermatology (10th ed.). Saunders. Pages 1, 11–12. ISBN 0-7216-2921-0.
  2. ^ Marks, James G; Miller, Jeffery (2006). Lookingbill and Marks' Principles of Dermatology (4th ed.). Elsevier Inc. Page 8–9. ISBN 1-4160-3185-5.
  3. ^ a b The Ageing Skin - Structure
  4. ^ http://microvet.arizona.edu/Courses/vsc422/secure/VSC422AppledHistologyLabHandout.pdf
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