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Direct-controlled municipality

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Title: Direct-controlled municipality  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Language: English
Subject: Municipality, Zhongzhou Reef, G1501 Shanghai Ring Expressway, Ancient Chinese urban planning, Baodi District
Collection: Municipalities, Types of Country Subdivisions, Types of Populated Places
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Direct-controlled municipality

A direct-controlled municipality is the highest level classification for cities used by unitary state, with status equal to that of the provinces in the respective countries. A direct-controlled municipality is similar to, but not the same as, a Federal district, a common designation in various countries for a municipality that is not part of any state, and which usually hosts some governmental functions. Usually direct-controlled municipality are under central governments control with limited power.

Each country has adopted this system with some different variations. Geographically and culturally, many of the municipalities are enclaves in the middle of provinces. Some occur in strategic positions in between provinces.
Country Municipalities Main article
 Belarus Minsk
 Cambodia Kep, Pailin, Phnom Penh, Sihanoukville
 China Beijing, Chongqing, Shanghai, Tianjin Direct-controlled municipalities of China
 Kazakhstan Almaty, Astana, Baikonur
 North Korea Pyongyang, Nampho, Rason Special cities of North Korea
 South Korea Seoul, Busan, Daegu, Incheon, Gwangju, Daejeon, Ulsan, Sejong Special cities of South Korea
 Kyrgyzstan Bishkek, Osh
 Laos Vientiane
 Moldova Chişinău, Bălţi, Bender
 Mongolia Ulan Bator (Ulaanbaatar)
 Republic of China (Taiwan) Taipei, Kaohsiung, New Taipei, Taichung, Tainan, Taoyuan Special municipality (Taiwan)
 Turkmenistan Ashgabat
 Ukraine Kiev, Sevastopol(disputed)
 Uzbekistan Tashkent
 Vietnam Hanoi, Ho Chi Minh City, Hai Phong, Da Nang, Can Tho Municipalities of Vietnam

See also

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