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Dublin postal districts

 

Dublin postal districts

Dublin postal districts are used by Ireland's postal service, known as An Post, to sort mail in Dublin. The system is similar to that used in cities in other European countries until they adopted national postal code systems in the 1960s and '70s. These may be incorporated into a new national postcode system that was to be introduced in 2011.[1]

History

The postal district system was introduced in 1917 by the British government, as a practical way to organise local postal distribution. This followed the example of other cities, notably London, first subdivided into ten districts in 1857, and Liverpool, the first city in Britain or Ireland to have postcodes, from 1864. The letter "D" was assigned to designate Dublin. The new Irish government retained the postal district system, but district numbers were not used by the public until 1961, when they were added to street signs. Prior to 1961, street signs only displayed the street name in Irish and English.

The number of districts was increased as the city grew, and in the 1970s, large districts were subdivided. Dublin 5 was split, with the coastal part retaining the "5" and the inland part becoming Dublin 17. Dublin 8, Ballyfermot, one of the city's fastest growing suburbs, became Dublin 10, along with Palmerstown and Chapelizod. However, Dublin 10 was subsequently split again, with Palmerstown and Chapelizod forming Dublin 20.[2]

In 1985, Dublin 6 was divided, with some areas, such as Templeogue, Kimmage and Terenure becoming part of a new district in order to facilitate processing of mail by a new delivery office for those areas. Residents of some areas objected to the assignation of the next available number, "Dublin 26," for the new postal district, citing property devaluation: the higher numbered districts typically represented less affluent and less central areas.[3] An Post ultimately relented, and the district became known as Dublin 6W. However, the eastern half of the old D6 postcode area remained "Dublin 6" rather than "Dublin 6E".

Structure

The postal district appears with one or two digits (or in the case of one district, a digit and a letter) appearing at the end of addresses, e.g.:

Dublin Orthodox Synagogue,
32 Rathfarnham Road,
Terenure,
Dublin 6W

In most cases, odd numbers are used for addresses on the Northside of the River Liffey, while even numbers are on addresses on the Southside. Exceptions to this are the Phoenix Park (along with a small area between the Park and the River Liffey), and Chapelizod Village which, although on the Northside, are parts of the Dublin 8 and Dublin 20 postal districts respectively.

The numbering system is not used for some areas in County Dublin, such as Dún Laoghaire, Blackrock, Lucan or Swords, though it is used for other county locations, for example Firhouse, Foxrock, Kilshane, Knocklyon and Tallaght.

Dublin's postal districts
Northside, covering local government area    Southside, covering local government area
Dublin 1 (D1) Dublin Dublin 2 (D2) Dublin
Dublin 3 (D3) Dublin Dublin 4 (D4) Dublin,
Dublin 5 (D5) Dublin Dublin 6 (D6) Dublin,
Dublin 7 (D7) Dublin Dublin 6W (D6W) Dublin, South Dublin
Dublin 8 (D8) Dublin Dublin 8 (D8) Dublin
Dublin 9 (D9) Dublin, Fingal Dublin 10 (D10) Dublin
Dublin 11 (D11) Dublin, Fingal Dublin 12 (D12) Dublin
Dublin 13 (D13) Dublin, Fingal Dublin 14 (D14) Dublin, Dún Laoghaire–Rathdown, South Dublin
Dublin 15 (D15) Fingal Dublin 16 (D16) Dún Laoghaire–Rathdown, South Dublin
Dublin 17 (D17) Dublin, Fingal Dublin 18 (D18) Dún Laoghaire–Rathdown
Dublin 20 (D20) Dublin, South Dublin
Dublin 22 (D22) South Dublin
Dublin 24 (D24) South Dublin
"County Dublin"; Fingal, South Dublin, Dún Laoghaire–Rathdown, and small pockets of Meath

It is proposed this system will be abolished with the introduction of a national postcode system, but no details have been released.[4]

An Post has stated that, with just one exception, no street name occurs more than once in any postal district.



  • Dublin 11 includes most of Ballymun west of Ballymun Road (Sillogue, Balcurris, Balbutcher, Poppintree, Sandyhill and Wadelai), Dubber Cross, Finglas (including Ballygall and Cappagh), most of Glasnevin (Cremore, Addison, Violet Hill, Finglas Road, Old Finglas Road and Glasnevin Cemetery), Kilshane Cross, The Ward and Coolquay.
  • Dublin 20 includes Chapelizod, and Palmerstown. This is one of only two postal districts to span the Liffey.
  • Dublin 22 includes Clondalkin, Rowlagh, Quarryvale and Liffey Valley, and Neilstown.

Future developments

Main article: Republic of Ireland postal addresses: Moving towards a postcode

Successive Ministers for Communications since 2005 have announced plans to introduce a full postcode system across the state. The plans remain controversial and no firm timetable exists for their introduction. It is envisaged that the pre-existing Dublin district numbers would be a component of the full postcode for relevant addresses. For example, an address in Dublin 4 might have the postcode D04 123.[6]

In 2006, The Sunday Times reported that the current system of postal districts would be retained and any postcode system will be placed after the current district number but the precise details of the system were not released .[7]

However, it was announced on 20 September 2009, that a national postcode system for Ireland would be implemented in 2011.[8] As of August 2013, the changes have still not been implemented.

Marketing

Public awareness of Dublin postal districts allows occasional use in marketing. Dublin n is usually abbreviated to Dn, as in:

See also

  • Republic of Ireland postal addresses

References

External links

  • An Post — The Post Office
  • ComReg — Commission for Communications Regulation
  • Universal Postal Union
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