World Library  
Flag as Inappropriate
Email this Article

Emicerfont

Article Id: WHEBN0047504867
Reproduction Date:

Title: Emicerfont  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Language: English
Subject: List of drugs: Em-Ep, SNAP-94847, Meclinertant, ATC-0175, SNAP-7941
Collection:
Publisher: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Publication
Date:
 

Emicerfont

Emicerfont
Systematic (IUPAC) name
1-(1-[1-(4-methoxy-2-methylphenyl)-6-methyl-2,3-dihydropyrrolo[2,3-b]pyridin-4-yl]pyrazol-3-yl)imidazolidin-2-one
Clinical data
Routes of
administration
Oral
Identifiers
CAS Registry Number
ATC code None
PubChem CID:
Chemical data
Formula C22H24N6O2
Molecular mass 404.465 g/mol

Emicerfont (GW-876,008) is a drug developed by GlaxoSmithKline which acts as a CRF-1 antagonist. Corticotropin releasing factor (CRF), also known as Corticotropin releasing hormone, is an endogenous peptide hormone which is released in response to various triggers such as chronic stress, and activates the two corticotropin-releasing hormone receptors CRH-1 and CRH-2. This then triggers the release of corticotropin (ACTH), another hormone which is involved in the physiological response to stress.

Emicerfont blocks the CRH-1 receptor, and so reduces ACTH release. It has been investigated for the treatment of irritable bowel syndrome and alcoholism, and while it was not effective enough to be adopted for medical use in these applications, it continues to be used for research, as the role of the CRH-ACTH system in IBS remains poorly understood.[1][2][3]


See also

References

  1. ^ Hubbard CS, Labus JS, Bueller J, Stains J, Suyenobu B, Dukes GE, Kelleher DL, Tillisch K, Naliboff BD, Mayer EA. Corticotropin-releasing factor receptor 1 antagonist alters regional activation and effective connectivity in an emotional-arousal circuit during expectation of abdominal pain. J Neurosci. 2011 Aug 31;31(35):12491-500. doi: 10.1523/JNEUROSCI.1860-11.2011 PMID 21880911
  2. ^ Zorrilla EP, Heilig M, de Wit H, Shaham Y. Behavioral, biological, and chemical perspectives on targeting CRF(1) receptor antagonists to treat alcoholism. Drug Alcohol Depend. 2013 Mar 1;128(3):175-86. doi: 10.1016/j.drugalcdep.2012.12.017 PMID 23294766
  3. ^ Labus JS, Hubbard CS, Bueller J, Ebrat B, Tillisch K, Chen M, Stains J, Dukes GE, Kelleher DL, Naliboff BD, Fanselow M, Mayer EA. Impaired emotional learning and involvement of the corticotropin-releasing factor signaling system in patients with irritable bowel syndrome. Gastroenterology. 2013 Dec;145(6):1253-61.e1-3. doi: 10.1053/j.gastro.2013.08.016 PMID 23954313


This article was sourced from Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. World Heritage Encyclopedia content is assembled from numerous content providers, Open Access Publishing, and in compliance with The Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR), Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., Public Library of Science, The Encyclopedia of Life, Open Book Publishers (OBP), PubMed, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and USA.gov, which sources content from all federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial government publication portals (.gov, .mil, .edu). Funding for USA.gov and content contributors is made possible from the U.S. Congress, E-Government Act of 2002.
 
Crowd sourced content that is contributed to World Heritage Encyclopedia is peer reviewed and edited by our editorial staff to ensure quality scholarly research articles.
 
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. World Heritage Encyclopedia™ is a registered trademark of the World Public Library Association, a non-profit organization.
 


Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from Project Gutenberg are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.