World Library  
Flag as Inappropriate
Email this Article

Enbilulu

Article Id: WHEBN0003561309
Reproduction Date:

Title: Enbilulu  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Language: English
Subject: Enlil, Abzu, Enki, Ancient Mesopotamian religion, Decad (Sumerian texts)
Collection:
Publisher: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Publication
Date:
 

Enbilulu


Enbilulu was the god of rivers and canals in Mesopotamian mythology. In the creation mythology he was placed in charge of the sacred rivers Tigris and Euphrates by the god Enki. Also he was the deity of irrigation and farming. In the Sumerian "Enlil and Ninlil" story he is a son of Enlil and Ninlil. In Babylonian times he becomes the son of Ea and is connected with Adad.

In the Enuma Elish Enbilulu is said to "know the secrets of water" and "of the running of rivers below the earth". Another version calls him "The Lord who makes all things flourish" who regulates for the land the grazing and watering places, who opened the wells and thereby apportioned the waters of abundance.

Various translations of Enuma Elish attribute as many as three separate aspects of divinity to Enbilulu. They include the names Epadun ("the lord who sprinkles the field", who knows the most subtle geometries of the earth), Enbilulugugal ("lord of abundance, opulence and ample crops", the power that presides over all growth and all things that grow), and Hegal ("who provides rich rains over the wide earth and provides vegetation for the people's consumption", often called the master of the arts of farming and agriculture as well as one who knows the secrets of metals).

References

  • Michael Jordan, Encyclopedia of Gods, Kyle Cathie Limited, 2002


This article was sourced from Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. World Heritage Encyclopedia content is assembled from numerous content providers, Open Access Publishing, and in compliance with The Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR), Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., Public Library of Science, The Encyclopedia of Life, Open Book Publishers (OBP), PubMed, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and USA.gov, which sources content from all federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial government publication portals (.gov, .mil, .edu). Funding for USA.gov and content contributors is made possible from the U.S. Congress, E-Government Act of 2002.
 
Crowd sourced content that is contributed to World Heritage Encyclopedia is peer reviewed and edited by our editorial staff to ensure quality scholarly research articles.
 
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. World Heritage Encyclopedia™ is a registered trademark of the World Public Library Association, a non-profit organization.
 


Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from Project Gutenberg are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.