World Library  
Flag as Inappropriate
Email this Article

Famprofazone

Article Id: WHEBN0028651866
Reproduction Date:

Title: Famprofazone  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Language: English
Subject: Fencamine, 3,4-Dimethylmethcathinone, 3-Fluoromethcathinone, 3-Fluoroethamphetamine, 4-Fluoromethamphetamine
Collection:
Publisher: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Publication
Date:
 

Famprofazone

Famprofazone
Systematic (IUPAC) name
1-methyl-5-{[methyl(1-phenylpropan-2-yl)amino]methyl}-2-phenyl-4-(propan-2-yl)-1,2-dihydro-3H-pyrazol-3-one
Clinical data
Legal status
  • Prescription only
Routes Oral
Identifiers
CAS number
ATC code None
PubChem
ChemSpider
UNII  YesY
Chemical data
Formula C24H31N3O 
Mol. mass 377.52 g/mol

Famprofazone (Gewodin, Gewolen) is a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agent (NSAID) of the pyrazolone series which is available over-the-counter in some countries such as Taiwan.[1][2][3] It has analgesic, anti-inflammatory, and antipyretic effects.[1][2] Famprofazone has been known to produce methamphetamine as an active metabolite, with 15-20% of an oral dose being converted to it.[4][5] As a result, famprofazone has occasionally been implicated in causing false positives on drug tests for amphetamines.[3]

See also

References

  1. ^ a b Swiss Pharmaceutical Society (2000). Index Nominum 2000: International Drug Directory (Book with CD-ROM). Boca Raton: Medpharm Scientific Publishers. p. 1932.  
  2. ^ a b Hall, Judith A.; Morton, Ian (1999). Concise dictionary of pharmacological agents: properties and synonyms. Kluwer Academic. p. 342.  
  3. ^ a b Chan KH, Hsu MC, Tseng CY, Chu WL (2010). "Famprofazone use can be misinterpreted as methamphetamine abuse". Journal of Analytical Toxicology 34 (6): 347–53.  
  4. ^ Oh ES, Hong SK, Kang GI (March 1992). "Plasma and urinary concentrations of methamphetamine after oral administration of famprofazone to man". Xenobiotica 22 (3): 377–84.  
  5. ^ Shin HS, Park BB, Choi SN, Oh JJ, Hong CP, Ryu H (1998). "Identification of new urinary metabolites of famprofazone in humans". Journal of Analytical Toxicology 22 (1): 55–60.  
This article was sourced from Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. World Heritage Encyclopedia content is assembled from numerous content providers, Open Access Publishing, and in compliance with The Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR), Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., Public Library of Science, The Encyclopedia of Life, Open Book Publishers (OBP), PubMed, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and USA.gov, which sources content from all federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial government publication portals (.gov, .mil, .edu). Funding for USA.gov and content contributors is made possible from the U.S. Congress, E-Government Act of 2002.
 
Crowd sourced content that is contributed to World Heritage Encyclopedia is peer reviewed and edited by our editorial staff to ensure quality scholarly research articles.
 
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. World Heritage Encyclopedia™ is a registered trademark of the World Public Library Association, a non-profit organization.
 


Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from Project Gutenberg are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.