World Library  
Flag as Inappropriate
Email this Article

Ferrari Ki Sawaari

Article Id: WHEBN0027191040
Reproduction Date:

Title: Ferrari Ki Sawaari  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Language: English
Subject: Parsi, Vidhu Vinod Chopra, List of sports films, Vidya Balan, Paresh Rawal, Sharman Joshi, Boman Irani, Pritam Chakraborty, Vinod Chopra Films, Swanand Kirkire
Collection:
Publisher: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Publication
Date:
 

Ferrari Ki Sawaari

Ferrari Ki Sawaari
File:Ferrari ki sawaari.jpg
Movie poster
Directed by Rajesh Mapuskar
Produced by Vidhu Vinod Chopra
Written by Rajesh Mapuskar
Vidhu Vinod Chopra
Starring Sharman Joshi
Boman Irani
Ritvik Sahore
Music by Pritam
Cinematography Sudhir Palsane
Editing by Deepa Bhatia
Rajkumar Hirani
Distributed by Vinod Chopra Productions
Release date(s)
Running time 146 minutes
Country India
Language Hindi
Budget INR10 crore ()
Box office INR44 crore ()[1]

Ferrari Ki Sawaari is a 2012 Hindi sports comedy film directed by Rajesh Mapuskar. The film is written by Rajesh Mapuskar and produced by Vidhu Vinod Chopra who is an Indian producer, starring Sharman Joshi in the lead. The film was released on 15 June 2012.

Synopsis

A little boy, Kayo (Ritvik Sahore) thinks of nothing but playing cricket. His father, Rusy (Sharman Joshi), thinks of nothing but his little boy. To fulfill his son's dream of playing at the Lord's Cricket Ground, the honest and upright Rusy performs his first small act of dishonesty: he borrows the gleaming red Ferrari owned by Sachin Tendulkar, for one day. The only problem is he doesn't inform its legendary owner. A wild, breathless, bumpy ride begins, a ride that leads to a menagerie of amazing characters: a wedding planner who'll stop at nothing, a Laurel-and-Hardyesque pair of loyal attendants, a greedy politician and his reckless son and a mechanic who specializes in stolen cars. As the Ferrari zooms through this chaotic world of street-thugs and mass-weddings, another saga unfolds – a grumpy old man and his secret wounds, and an epic rivalry that goes back thirty-eight years

Cast

  • Sharman Joshi as Rusy (Rustam Behram Deboo)
  • Boman Irani as Father of Rusy (Behram Deboo)
  • Ritvik Sahore as Kayo (Kayoze Rustam Deboo)
  • Paresh Rawal as Dilip Dharmadhikari (cameo)
  • Vidya Balan in a Special Appearance (Song - Mala Jau De)
  • Satyadeep Mishra as Kayo's Cricket Coach
  • Achyut Potdar as Shop Owner

Development

Rajesh Mapuskar has worked as an Associate Director on films such as 3 Idiots (2009) and Lage Raho Munna Bhai (2006); in fact the idea of the film came to him during the post-production work of Lage Raho Munna Bhai, when for an advertising assignment he went out looking for expensive cars in Mumbai, he found them all except a Ferrari. Eventually he managed to track a Ferrari parked at Pali Hill. This gave him the idea, "What if I steal this car for a day? What will happen?", which developed into the idea of Sachin Tendulkar's Ferrari and the script was developed over the next seven and a half years along with Vidhu Vinod Chopra.[2]

Music

The background music as well as the soundtrack is composed by Pritam. The album contains seven original tracks. The lyrics are penned by five different lyricists. Swanand Kirkire, Amitabh Bhattacharya, Guru Thakur and duo of Satyanshu & Devanshu Singh. Madhu Soodha of Goarticles.com noted' "The soundtrack of "Ferrari Ki Sawaari" does not take you on a rollercoaster ride, but with five lyricists at his helm, Pritam has managed to dole out a decent album. It has an array of tracks, which can manage to generate a happy and positive response from listeners."[3]

Ferrari Ki Sawaari
Soundtrack album by Pritam
Released May 2012
Genre Film soundtrack
Length 29:06
Label T-Series
Producer Pritam
Pritam chronology

Jannat 2
(2012)
Ferrari Ki Sawaari
(2012)
Cocktail
(2013)


Track listing

No. TitleSinger(s) Length
1. "Ferrari Ki Sawaari"  Shaan, Boman Irani, Aayush Phukan 3:43
2. "Life Yeh Mausambi Si"  K. Mohan (Agnee) 4:14
3. "Aey Mere Mann"  Shyamantan Das 5:09
4. "Mala Jau De"  Urmila Dhangar 4:16

Reception

Critical reception

The movie received good critical reviews for its storyline and performances. Taran Adarsh of Bollywood Hangama gave the movie a 3.5/5.[4] Subhash K. Jha of IANS gave it 3 out 5 stars and said, "The dialogues in Ferrari Ki Sawaari lack the punch of Hirani's Munnabhai films but the heart is still in the right place. Honestly, the film is hard to dislike. It has moments of immense warmth and humour."[5] Rajeev Masand of CNN IBN gave 2.5/5 stars and mentioned that "it would have been a good movie if was kept short." Taran Adarsh of Bollywood Hungama gave it 3.5 out 5 stars, saying that "This heartwarming, tender and sprightly film should not be missed!".[6] Rediff gave the movie 2.5 stars out of 5. Rachit Gupta of Filmfare gave a rating of 4 stars out of 5. He said,"Ferrari Ki Sawaari is a well constructed film that switches between drama and comedy with ease. Hirani’s dialogue is pitch-perfect."[7] Madhureeta Mukherjee of Times of India gave it 4 stars out of five,[8] with Kunal Guha of Yahoo! Movies and Sonia Chopra of Sify giving 1.5 and 3 stars out of five respectively.[9][10]

Box office

India

Ferrari Ki Sawaari collected INR2.75 crore () nett approx. on day one.[11] The film showed growth on Saturday as it was around INR3.75 crore ();[12] it picked up on Sunday as it collected around INR5.50 crore () nett for a weekend total of around INR12.25 crore () nett.[13] Ferrari Ki Sawaari's first week collection was around INR19.50 crore ().[14] Ferrari Ki Sawaari grossed INR7.25 crore () nett approx in week two.[15]

Overseas

Ferrari Ki Sawaari collected around $650,000 in overseas which is decent for a non-star cast film but considering the near 250 screen release it is a low figure. The collections from major markets are as follows: UK - £80,000; North America (Canada & USA) - $240,000; UAE - $150,000; Australia - $32,000.

References

External links

  • Official Website
  • Internet Movie Database
  • Bollywood Hungama
  • Ferrari Ki Sawaari Fan Site
  • "BumperHit.com
This article was sourced from Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. World Heritage Encyclopedia content is assembled from numerous content providers, Open Access Publishing, and in compliance with The Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR), Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., Public Library of Science, The Encyclopedia of Life, Open Book Publishers (OBP), PubMed, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and USA.gov, which sources content from all federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial government publication portals (.gov, .mil, .edu). Funding for USA.gov and content contributors is made possible from the U.S. Congress, E-Government Act of 2002.
 
Crowd sourced content that is contributed to World Heritage Encyclopedia is peer reviewed and edited by our editorial staff to ensure quality scholarly research articles.
 
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. World Heritage Encyclopedia™ is a registered trademark of the World Public Library Association, a non-profit organization.
 


Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from Project Gutenberg are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.