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Flight training

A Canadian aeroplane flight instructor (left) and her student, next to a Cessna 172 with which they have just completed a lesson.

Flight training is a course of study used when learning to pilot an aircraft. The overall purpose of primary and intermediate flight training is the acquisition and honing of basic airmanship skills.[1]

Flight training consists of a combination of flight lessons given in the aircraft or a simulator and ground school, where theory is learned in preparation for the written examinations.[2]

Although there are various types of aircraft, many of the principles of piloting them have common techniques, especially those aircraft which are heavier than air types.

In addition to providing flight instructors, flight schools commonly rent aircraft to the students.

The oldest flight training school still in existence is the Royal Air Force's (RAF's) Central Flying School formed in May 1912 at Upavon, United Kingdom.[3] The oldest civil flight school still active in the world is based in Germany at the Wasserkuppe. It was founded as "Mertens Fliegerschule". Its current name is "Fliegerschule Wasserkuppe".[4]

Contents

  • Type conversion 1
  • See also 2
  • References 3
  • External links 4

Type conversion

A type conversion commonly known throughout Australia and Europe as an endorsement, or in the United States as a "type rating",[5] is the process undertaken by a pilot to update their license to allow them to fly a different type of aircraft.

See also

References

  1. ^ Airplane Flying Handbook. Washington, DC,  
  2. ^ Culnane, Michael J., Instructor Rating Ground School Course, Accelerated Aviation Training, December 2001, page iii.
  3. ^ "Royal flying corps: Central Flying school". Flight Archive. Flight global. 1912-04-20. Retrieved 2012-06-23. 
  4. ^ Jenrich, Joachim (2007). Die Wasserkuppe – Ein Berg mit Geschichte [The water dome - A mountain with history] (in German). Fulda,  
  5. ^ Federal Air Regulation (61.31), US: GPO .

External links

  • Learning to Fly: A Practical Manual for Beginners (1916) by Claude Grahame-White and Harry Harper
  • Student Pilot Guide from the FAA
  • Accelerated Flight Training from Flying Mag.
  • Pilot Training Compass: Back to the Future from European Cockpit Association.
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