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Fluocinolone acetonide

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Title: Fluocinolone acetonide  
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Subject: Prednisolone, Dexamethasone, Fluocinonide, Corticosteroid, Prednylidene
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Fluocinolone acetonide

Fluocinolone acetonide is a corticosteroid primarily used in dermatology to reduce skin inflammation and relieve itching. It is a synthetic hydrocortisone derivative. The fluorine substitution at position 9 in the steroid nucleus greatly enhances its activity. It was first synthesized in 1959 in the Research Department of Syntex Laboratories S.A. Mexico City.[126] Preparations containing it were first marketed under the name Synalar. A typical dosage strength used in dermatology is 0.01–0.025%. One such cream is sold under the brand name Flucort-N and includes the antibiotic neomycin.

Fluocinolone acetonide was also found to strongly potentiate TGF-β-associated chondrogenesis of bone marrow mesenchymal stem/progenitor cells, by increasing the levels of collagen type II by more than 100 fold compared to the widely used dexamethasone.[127]

Flucinolone is a group IV (0.01-0.2%) or group V (0.025%) corticosteroid under US classification.

See also

References

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  127. ^ Hara ES, Ono M, Pham HT, Sonoyama W, Kubota S, Takigawa M, Matsumoto T, Young MF, Olsen BR, Kuboki T. Fluocinolone Acetonide is a Potent Synergistic Factor of TGF-β3-Associated Chondrogenesis of Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells for Articular Surface Regeneration. J Bone Miner Res. 2015. http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/jbmr.2502/abstract



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