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Fred (footballer)

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Fred (footballer)

Fred
Fred playing for Brazil against Mexico at the 2014 FIFA World Cup
Personal information
Full name Frederico Chaves Guedes[1]
Date of birth (1983-10-03) 3 October 1983
Place of birth Teófilo Otoni, Minas Gerais, Brazil
Height 1.86 m (6 ft 1 in)[2]
Playing position Striker
Club information
Current team
Fluminense
Number 9
Youth career
1988–2002 América Mineiro
Senior career*
Years Team Apps (Gls)
2003–2004 América Mineiro 26 (9)
2004–2005 Cruzeiro 43 (24)
2005–2009 Lyon 88 (34)
2009– Fluminense 139 (86)
National team
2005–2014 Brazil 39 (18)

* Senior club appearances and goals counted for the domestic league only and correct as of 19:32, 11 September 2015 (UTC).
† Appearances (goals)

‡ National team caps and goals correct as of 8 July 2014

Frederico Chaves Guedes (born 3 October 1983), known as Fred (Brazilian Portuguese: ), is a Brazilian professional footballer who plays as a striker for Campeonato Brasileiro Série A club Fluminense.

Fred began his career at América Mineiro before transferring to local rivals Cruzeiro in 2004. After two seasons there, he moved to Lyon of France in a protracted transfer saga, and won three consecutive Ligue 1 titles. He made his international debut for Brazil in 2005 and was selected for the 2006 World Cup, and was also part of their victories at the 2007 Copa América and the 2013 Confederations Cup. Since 2009, Fred has played for Fluminense, where he won two Campeonato Brasileiro Série A titles in 2 years (2010 and 2012) and Campeonato Carioca (2012 – scoring in final).

Fred scored one of the fastest goals in professional football history while playing for América Mineiro, against Vila Nova during a Copa São Paulo de Juniores match. The goal was scored 3.17 seconds after the match started.[3][4]

Club career

Brazil & transfer saga

Fred spent four seasons at América-MG of Belo Horizonte, before he left for their city rival Cruzeiro in middle of the 2004 season. As Feyenoord had an agreement with América, the Dutch club got Magrão from Cruzeiro,[5] and retained 10% economic rights on Fred, and Fred himself held 15%.[5]

After scoring 41 goals in 43 games for Cruzeiro in the 2005 season, Fred was signed by defending Ligue 1 champions Lyon for €15 million.[5] (of which €3 million was received by Fred, 5% as a solidarity contribution, €1.4 million to Lyon's agent and €510,913 in Brazilian taxes).[5][6] Feyenoord then claimed Cruzeiro's 10% of the transfer fee, as the club alleged the fee was €1.5 million instead of the €933,908.70 in Cruzeiro's viewpoint.[5] The Dutch club sued to the Court of Arbitration for Sport and won.[5]

Lyon

With 14 goals in his first season, Fred was the second highest goal scorer in the 2005–06 Ligue 1 season, and won his first league title with Lyon. Although he missed two months of the 2006–07 season,[7] Fred still scored 11 goals in 20 games, and was the club's top scorer as Lyon defended their title. However, during the 2007–08 season, Fred was injured during a training session at the 2007 Copa América.[8] He made his comeback in October 2007, but due to competition with new signing Milan Baroš and youth product Karim Benzema, Fred had limited first team opportunities. His most known moment was scoring the goal vs Real Madrid in 2006 group stages after a long pass by Juninho and Fred outstrengthed right back Sergio Ramos and Fabio Cannavaro before chipping it over goalkeeper Iker Casillas.[9] Fred played 15 games out of possible 20 for Lyon in the 2008–09 season. He played his last match for Lyon on 10 January 2009 after he requested to leave the club in December 2008.[10] On 26 February 2009 he was released from his contract with the French club.[11]

Fluminense

After being released from Lyon and refusing to return from Brazil, Fred signed a pre-contract with Brazilian club Fluminense, and consequently agreed to a five-year deal. He scored twice on his debut on 15 March 2009, as Fluminense beat Macaé 3–1.[12] Later in July 2011, he went on to break the record for most goals in the Brasileiro when he scored a brace against Esporte Clube Bahia, taking his tally to 44 goals. The record was previously held by Magno Alves. On 11 November 2012, Fred scored 2 goals in a 3–2 win over Palmeiras, clinching the 2012 Campeonato Brasileiro Série A for Fluminense.[13]

International career

Fred and Colombia's Cristián Zapata and Juan Guillermo Cuadrado in the quarter-finals of the 2014 FIFA World Cup

Fred made his debut for Brazil as a late substitute in a friendly match against Guatemala on 27 April 2005. He scored his first two international goals on 12 November 2005 in an 8–0 friendly win against the United Arab Emirates.

Although he didn't play during the qualifying campaign, Fred was named in Brazil's 2006 FIFA World Cup squad as a cover for strikers Ronaldo, Adriano and Robinho. After coming on as a substitute, he scored in a 2–0 victory against Australia on 18 June 2006, when he tapped in a shot from Robinho which had rebounded off the inside of Mark Schwarzer's near post in the 90th minute. The result put Brazil into the last 16 with a game to spare.[14]

Fred scoring a goal against Cameroon in the 2014 World Cup

In the 2011 Copa América, Fred scored an 89th-minute equaliser against Paraguay in a 2–2 draw. In the quarter-finals, he was one of four Brazil players to miss in a 2–0 penalty shootout loss against the same opposition.

In 2013, Fred was established as Brazil's first choice centre forward by returning manager Luiz Felipe Scolari. On February 6, he scored in a 2–1 defeat to England at Wembley Stadium, and went on to score in the return fixture, becoming the first player to score at the renovated Estádio do Maracanã.[15]

At the 2013 FIFA Confederations Cup, Fred was the joint top scorer of the tournament with five goals, and was awarded the Silver Shoe.[16] On 22 June, he scored twice against Italy in the in a 4–2 group stage win.[17] He later scored in a 2–1 semi-final victory over Uruguay, and capped his successful Confederations Cup campaign with two goals against Spain in the competition's final to help Brazil to a 3–0 victory.[16]

In May 2014, Fred was named in Brazil's squad for the 2014 FIFA World Cup.[18] In the opening match of the tournament, on 12 June against Croatia in São Paulo, Fred dived in the 69th minute,[19] resulting in a controversial penalty, which Neymar converted for 2–1, and their eventual 3–1 win.[20] After receiving criticism for his performances in the opening two matches,[21] Fred scored his only goal of the tournament in the final group match, a 4–1 victory over Cameroon which qualified the team for the round of 16.[22] He managed just five shots on target at the tournament, in six matches played.[23] Fred's prolonged run of poor form saw the player receive hostile jeers from the home crowd whenever he touched the ball in the 7–1 defeat to Germany in Belo Horizonte.[24] According to Opta Sports, Fred failed to make a single tackle, cross, run or interception during the match, and spent the most time in possession of the ball on the centre spot due to seven restarts and one kick-off.[25] Following Brazil's 3–0 defeat to the Netherlands in the third place match, Fred announced his retirement from international competition.[26] It was reported on 16 September 2014 that Fred came out of retirement, after previously announcing retirement following the criticism he received during the 2014 FIFA World Cup.[27] Despite his intention to return to the Seleção, Fred confirmed his international career is over, as he has yet to feature in a Brazil squad since Scolari's departure.[28]

Personal life

Fred is a convert to Protestant Christianity.[29][30]

Career statistics

Club

As of 1 June 2015[31][32][33]
Club Season League Cup League Cup Continental State League Total
Apps Goals Apps Goals Apps Goals Apps Goals Apps Goals Apps Goals
América Mineiro 2003 19 7 10 18 29 25
2004 7 2 3 2 12 16 22 20
Total 26 9 3 2 22 34 51 45
Cruzeiro 2004 24 14 1 1 25 15
2005 19 10 9 14 1 0 17 14 46 38
Total 43 24 9 14 1 0 18 15 71 53
Lyon 2005–06 32 14 0 0 1 0 9 2 42 16
2006–07 20 11 0 0 2 0 5 2 27 13
2007–08 21 7 4 1 2 0 3 0 30 8
2008–09 15 2 0 0 1 0 4 2 20 4
Total 88 34 4 1 6 0 21 6 119 41
Fluminense 2009 20 12 6 2 6 5 4 3 36 22
2010 14 5 5 6 9 7 28 18
2011 25 22 5 2 13 10 43 34
2012 28 20 7 3 10 7 45 30
2013 9 3 2 0 7 3 7 2 25 8
2014 28 18 5 4 2 0 11 5 46 27
2015 16 6 1 0 0 0 14 11 31 17
Total 140 86 19 12 27 13 68 45 254 156
Career total 297 153 35 29 6 0 49 19 109 94 496 295

International appearances

As of 13 July 2014[34]
National team Season Apps Goals Ratio
Brazil
2005 2 2 1.00
2006 5* 2 0.40
2007 2 0 0.00
2008 0 0 0.00
2009 0 0 0.00
2010 0 0 0.00
2011 9 2 0.22
2012 1 1 1.00
2013 11 9 0.90
2014 9 2 0.22
Total 39 18 0.46

*The match against Al Kuwait XI was not counted.

International goals

Scores and results list Brazil's goal tally first
# Date Venue Opponent Score Result Competition
1. 12 November 2005 Al Jazira Mohammed Bin Zayed Stadium, Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates  United Arab Emirates 3–0 8–0 Friendly
2. 12 November 2005 Al Jazira Mohammed Bin Zayed Stadium, Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates  United Arab Emirates 7–0 8–0 Friendly
3. 18 June 2006 Allianz Arena, Munich, Germany  Australia 2–0 2–0 2006 FIFA World Cup
4. 10 October 2006 Råsunda Stadium, Solna, Sweden  Ecuador 1–1 2–1 Friendly
5. 7 June 2011 Estádio do Pacaembu, São Paulo, Brazil  Romania 1–0 1–0 Friendly
6. 9 July 2011 Estadio Mario Alberto Kempes, Córdoba, Argentina  Paraguay 2–2 2–2 2011 Copa América
7. 21 November 2012 Estadio Alberto J. Armando, Buenos Aires, Argentina  Argentina 1–1 1–2 2012 Superclásico de las Américas
8. 6 February 2013 Wembley Stadium, London, England  England 1–1 1–2 Friendly
9. 21 March 2013 Stade de Genève, Geneva, Switzerland  Italy 1–0 2–2 Friendly
10. 25 March 2013 Stamford Bridge, London, England  Russia 1–1 1–1 Friendly
11. 2 June 2013 Estádio do Maracanã, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil  England 1–0 2–2 Friendly
12. 22 June 2013 Arena Fonte Nova, Salvador, Brazil  Italy 3–1 4–2 2013 FIFA Confederations Cup
13. 22 June 2013 Arena Fonte Nova, Salvador, Brazil  Italy 4–2 4–2 2013 FIFA Confederations Cup
14. 26 June 2013 Mineirão, Belo Horizonte, Brazil  Uruguay 1–0 2–1 2013 FIFA Confederations Cup
15. 30 June 2013 Estádio do Maracanã, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil 1–0 3–0 2013 FIFA Confederations Cup
16. 30 June 2013 Estádio do Maracanã, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil 3–0 3–0 2013 FIFA Confederations Cup
17. 6 June 2014 Estádio do Morumbi, São Paulo, Brazil  Serbia 1–0 1–0 Friendly
18. 23 June 2014 Estádio Nacional Mané Garrincha, Brasília, Brazil  Cameroon 3–1 4–1 2014 FIFA World Cup

Honours

[32]

Club

Olympique Lyonnais
Fluminense

Country

Brazil

Individual

References

  1. ^
  2. ^
  3. ^
  4. ^ The Fastest Goal Ever
  5. ^ a b c d e f
  6. ^
  7. ^
  8. ^
  9. ^
  10. ^
  11. ^
  12. ^
  13. ^
  14. ^
  15. ^
  16. ^ a b
  17. ^
  18. ^
  19. ^
  20. ^
  21. ^
  22. ^
  23. ^
  24. ^
  25. ^
  26. ^
  27. ^
  28. ^
  29. ^
  30. ^
  31. ^
  32. ^ a b
  33. ^
  34. ^ Fred | National Football Teams
  35. ^ Match Report

External links

  • Official website
  • Fred – FIFA competition record
  • Fred at National-Football-Teams.com
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