World Library  
Flag as Inappropriate
Email this Article
 

Frenchtown, New Jersey

Frenchtown, New Jersey
Borough
Borough of Frenchtown
Harrison Street in Frenchtown
Harrison Street in Frenchtown
Map of Frenchtown in Hunterdon County. Inset: Location of Hunterdon County in the State of New Jersey.
Map of Frenchtown in Hunterdon County. Inset: Location of Hunterdon County in the State of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Frenchtown, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Frenchtown, New Jersey
Coordinates: [1][2]
Country  United States
State  New Jersey
County Hunterdon
Incorporated April 4, 1867
Government[3][4]
 • Type Borough
 • Mayor Warren E. Cooper (term ends December 31, 2015)[5]
 • Clerk Brenda S. Shepherd[6]
Area[1]
 • Total 1.361 sq mi (3.524 km2)
 • Land 1.263 sq mi (3.271 km2)
 • Water 0.098 sq mi (0.253 km2)  7.17%
Area rank 465th of 566 in state
19th of 26 in county[1]
Elevation[7] 220 ft (70 m)
Population (2010 Census)[8][9][10]
 • Total 1,373
 • Estimate (2014)[11] 1,394
 • Rank 521st of 566 in state
21st of 26 in county[12]
 • Density 1,087.2/sq mi (419.8/km2)
 • Density rank 371st of 566 in state
8th of 26 in county[12]
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP code 08825[13][14]
Area code(s) 908[15]
FIPS code 3401925350[1][16][17]
GNIS feature ID 0885227[1][18]
Website .comfrenchtownboro

Frenchtown is a borough in Hunterdon County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the borough's population was 1,373,[8][9][10] reflecting a decline of 115 (-7.7%) from the 1,488 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn declined by 40 (-2.6%) from the 1,528 counted in the 1990 Census.[19]

Frenchtown is located along the banks of the Delaware River on the Hunterdon Plateau. Various names have been applied to this settlement, after the many ferry operators residing on both sides of the river. The community had variously been known as Alexandria Ville, Sunbeam and Frenchtown over the years. The Borough was formed by an Act of the New Jersey Legislature on April 4, 1867, from portions of Alexandria Township. Additional territory was acquired from Kingwood Township in 1876.[20]

The first bridge across the Delaware at Frenchtown was a six-span covered wooden bridge built in 1841 on the five piers that still stand today, and the community became a gateway to Pennsylvania. The Uhlerstown-Frenchtown Bridge, a free Delaware River Joint Toll Bridge Commission bridge over the Delaware River connects Frenchtown to Uhlerstown, Bucks County, Pennsylvania.[21]

Contents

  • History 1
  • Geography 2
  • Demographics 3
    • Census 2010 3.1
    • Census 2000 3.2
  • Government 4
    • Local government 4.1
    • Federal, state and county representation 4.2
    • Politics 4.3
  • Education 5
  • Transportation 6
  • Notable people 7
  • See also 8
  • References 9
  • External links 10

History

In 1757, three joint owners of a tract purchased from the West Jersey Land Society began laying out streets and building lots at Calvin's Ferry. The developing town was to be called "Alexandria" in honor of William Alexander, Lord Stirling, one of the three owners.[22] In 1776, the three sold the settlement to Thomas Lowrey, a Flemington speculator.

In 1794, Lowrey sold the tract to Paul Henri Mallet-Prevost, a Swiss fugitive from the French Revolution. He and other early settlers were French speaking, leading some to begin calling the place "Frenchtown."[23][24]

The town grew substantially in the next four decades. A trade in grain and other farm products developed. Boatmen and river men helped fuel Frenchtown's growth through their buying of cargo and food, and hiring of pilots. In the years after Henri Mallet-Prevost's death, his sons sold off portions of their property; no longer was the town privately owned.

The arrival of the Belvidere Delaware Railroad in 1853 sparked continued growth in Frenchtown. Steam-powered industry became widely developed, and by the 1860s, mills were being converted into larger factories. Around the same time, the town had three major hotels, The Lower Hotel (Present day Frenchtown Inn), The Middle Hotel (no longer existing), and the Upper Hotel (The National Hotel). In 1889, Britton Brothers Big Brick Store, which sold a variety of goods, opened on Bridge Street.

In the early 20th century, growth was spurred by the arrival of Frenchtown Porcelain Works, the establishment of the Milford plant of the Warren Paper Company, and the rise of the poultry industry.[25]

Geography

According to the United States Census Bureau, the borough had a total area of 1.361 square miles (3.524 km2), including 1.263 square miles (3.271 km2) of land and 0.098 square miles (0.253 km2) of water (7.17%).[1][2]

Frenchtown borders Kingwood Township and Alexandria Township. Frenchtown also borders the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania and is south of Milford borough.

Frenchtown Solar is a group of three photvoltaic arrays forming one of the largest solar farms in the state covering 110 acres (44.5 ha) with 68,500 solar panels and 20.1 megawatt capacity.[26]

Demographics

Census 2010

At the 2010 United States Census, there were 1,373 people, 596 households, and 365.9 families residing in the borough. The population density was 1,087.2 per square mile (419.8/km2). There were 656 housing units at an average density of 519.4 per square mile (200.5/km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 96.65% (1,327) White, 0.80% (11) Black or African American, 0.36% (5) Native American, 0.95% (13) Asian, 0.00% (0) Pacific Islander, 0.07% (1) from other races, and 1.17% (16) from two or more races. Hispanics or Latinos of any race were 5.10% (70) of the population.[8]

There were 596 households, of which 26.7% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 46.0% were married couples living together, 11.1% had a female householder with no husband present, and 38.6% were non-families. 31.4% of all households were made up of individuals, and 8.7% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.27 and the average family size was 2.88.[8]

In the borough, 20.9% of the population were under the age of 18, 6.2% from 18 to 24, 27.3% from 25 to 44, 34.3% from 45 to 64, and 11.3% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 42.6 years. For every 100 females there were 95.6 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 95.3 males.[8]

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $62,574 (with a margin of error of +/- $9,339) and the median family income was $76,250 (+/- $12,807). Males had a median income of $62,500 (+/- $7,602) versus $34,886 (+/- $5,656) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $33,966 (+/- $5,364). About 4.9% of families and 8.0% of the population were below the poverty line, including 11.1% of those under age 18 and 4.3% of those age 65 or over.[35]

Census 2000

As of the 2000 United States Census[16] there were 1,488 people, 613 households, and 375 families residing in the borough. The population density was 1,160.7 people per square mile (448.8/km2). There were 630 housing units at an average density of 491.4 per square mile (190.0/km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 95.97% White, 0.40% African American, 0.20% Native American, 1.21% Asian, 1.34% from other races, and 0.87% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 2.62% of the population.[33][34]

There were 613 households out of which 30.7% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 49.9% were married couples living together, 8.5% had a female householder with no husband present, and 38.7% were non-families. 28.9% of all households were made up of individuals and 7.8% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.38 and the average family size was 2.99.[33][34]

In the borough the population was spread out with 22.5% under the age of 18, 6.5% from 18 to 24, 35.2% from 25 to 44, 25.9% from 45 to 64, and 9.8% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 38 years. For every 100 females there were 94.0 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 95.4 males.[33][34]

The median income for a household in the borough was $52,109, and the median income for a family was $62,132. Males had a median income of $42,321 versus $30,952 for females. The per capita income for the borough was $27,765. About 2.4% of families and 3.3% of the population were below the poverty line, including 4.0% of those under age 18 and 1.4% of those age 65 or over.[33][34]

Government

Local government

Frenchtown is governed under the Borough form of New Jersey municipal government. The governing body consists of a Mayor and a Borough Council comprising six council members, with all positions elected at-large on a partisan basis as part of the November general election. A Mayor is elected directly by the voters to a four-year term of office. The Borough Council consists of six members elected to serve three-year terms on a staggered basis, with two seats coming up for election each year in a three-year cycle.[3] The Borough form of government used by Frenchtown, the most common system used in the state, is a "weak mayor / strong council" government in which council members act as the legislative body with the mayor presiding at meetings and voting only in the event of a tie. The mayor can veto ordinances subject to an override by a two-thirds majority vote of the council. The mayor makes committee and liaison assignments for council members, and most appointments are made by the mayor with the advice and consent of the council.[36][37]

As of 2015, the Mayor of Frenchtown is Democrat Warren Cooper, whose term of office ends on December 31, 2015.[4] Cooper won election on November 8, 2011, defeating 16-year incumbent Ronald Sworen.[38] Members of the Borough Council are Seth A. Grossman (D, 2015), Catherine Leach (D, 2016), Michele Liebtag (D, 2017), Jack Opdyke (R, 2016; serving an unexpired term), Caroline Scutt (D, 2017) and William E. Sullivan III (R, 2015).[39][40]

Jack Opdyke was appointed in August 2013 to replace Councilman Robb Arent following his resignation[41]

Federal, state and county representation

Frenchtown is located in the 7th Congressional District[42] and is part of New Jersey's 23rd state legislative district.[9][43][44] Prior to the 2010 Census, Frenchtown had been part of the 12th Congressional District, a change made by the New Jersey Redistricting Commission that took effect in January 2013, based on the results of the November 2012 general elections.[45]

New Jersey's Seventh Congressional District is represented by Leonard Lance (R, Clinton Township).[46] New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Cory Booker (D, Newark, term ends 2021)[47] and Bob Menendez (D, Paramus, 2019).[48][49]

For the 2014-2015 Session, the 23rd Legislative District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Michael J. Doherty (R, Washington Township, Warren County) and in the General Assembly by John DiMaio (R, Hackettstown) and Erik Peterson (R, Franklin Township, Hunterdon County).[50][51] The Governor of New Jersey is Chris Christie (R, Mendham Township).[52] The Lieutenant Governor of New Jersey is Kim Guadagno (R, Monmouth Beach).[53]

External links

  1. ^ a b c d e f 2010 Census Gazetteer Files: New Jersey County Subdivisions, United States Census Bureau. Accessed May 21, 2015.
  2. ^ a b US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990, United States Census Bureau. Accessed September 4, 2014.
  3. ^ a b 2012 New Jersey Legislative District Data Book, Rutgers University Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, March 2013, p. 103.
  4. ^ a b Frenchtown Borough, Hunterdon County, New Jersey. Accessed July 9, 2014.
  5. ^ 2014 New Jersey Mayors Directory, New Jersey Department of Community Affairs, as of December 15, 2014. Accessed January 12, 2015.
  6. ^ List of Departments, Frenchtown, NJ. Accessed November 14, 2012.
  7. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Borough of Frenchtown, Geographic Names Information System. Accessed March 5, 2013.
  8. ^ a b c d e f DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 for Frenchtown borough, Hunterdon County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed November 14, 2012.
  9. ^ a b c d Municipalities Grouped by 2011-2020 Legislative Districts, New Jersey Department of State, p. 10. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  10. ^ a b c Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2010 for Frenchtown borough, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Accessed November 14, 2012.
  11. ^ a b PEPANNRES - Annual Estimates of the Resident Population: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2014 - 2014 Population Estimates for New Jersey municipalities, United States Census Bureau. Accessed May 21, 2015.
  12. ^ a b GCT-PH1 Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - State -- County Subdivision from the 2010 Census Summary File 1 for New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed November 14, 2012.
  13. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code for Frenchtown, NJ, United States Postal Service. Accessed November 14, 2012.
  14. ^ Zip Codes, State of New Jersey. Accessed August 21, 2013.
  15. ^ Area Code Lookup - NPA NXX for Frenchtown, NJ, Area-Codes.com. Accessed February 17, 2015.
  16. ^ a b American FactFinder, United States Census Bureau. Accessed September 4, 2014.
  17. ^ A Cure for the Common Codes: New Jersey, Missouri Census Data Center. Accessed October 28, 2012.
  18. ^ US Board on Geographic Names, United States Geological Survey. Accessed September 4, 2014.
  19. ^ Table 7. Population for the Counties and Municipalities in New Jersey: 1990, 2000 and 2010, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development, February 2011. Accessed November 14, 2012.
  20. ^ Snyder, John P. The Story of New Jersey's Civil Boundaries: 1606-1968, Bureau of Geology and Topography; Trenton, New Jersey; 1969. p. 155. Accessed August 21, 2013.
  21. ^ Uhlerstown-Frenchtown bridge, Delaware River Joint Toll Bridge Commission. Accessed June 2, 2008.
  22. ^ The Alexandrian Era, Frenchtowner.com. Accessed February 20, 2013. "In 1744, James Alexander purchased 10,000 acres in and around Frenchtown NJ. In 1757, William Alexander and two partners planned out the streets and building lots of our village."
  23. ^ Hutchinson, Viola L. The Origin of New Jersey Place Names, New Jersey Public Library Commission, May 1945. Accessed August 31, 2015.
  24. ^ Herman, Jennifer New Jersey Encyclopedia, p. 279. State History Publications, 2008. ISBN 9781878592446. Accessed August 31, 2015.
  25. ^ Friends of the Frenchtown Library. The Growth of Frenchtown.
  26. ^ Solar Projects, Con Edison Development. Accessed August 31, 2015.
  27. ^ Census Estimates for New Jersey April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2014, United States Census Bureau. Accessed May 21, 2015.
  28. ^ Compendium of censuses 1726-1905: together with the tabulated returns of 1905, New Jersey Department of State, 1906. Accessed August 21, 2013.
  29. ^ Porter, Robert Percival. Preliminary Results as Contained in the Eleventh Census Bulletins: Volume III - 51 to 75, p. 98. United States Census Bureau, 1890. Accessed November 14, 2012.
  30. ^ Thirteenth Census of the United States, 1910: Population by Counties and Minor Civil Divisions, 1910, 1900, 1890, United States Census Bureau, p. 337. Accessed November 14, 2012.
  31. ^ Fifteenth Census of the United States : 1930 - Population Volume I, United States Census Bureau, p. 716. Accessed November 14, 2012.
  32. ^ New Jersey Resident Population by Municipality: 1930 - 1990, Workforce New Jersey Public Information Network. Accessed June 28, 2015.
  33. ^ a b c d e Census 2000 Profiles of Demographic / Social / Economic / Housing Characteristics for Frenchtown borough, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed November 14, 2012.
  34. ^ a b c d e DP-1: Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2000 - Census 2000 Summary File 1 (SF 1) 100-Percent Data for Frenchtown borough, Hunterdon County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed November 14, 2012.
  35. ^ DP03: Selected Economic Characteristics from the 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates for Frenchtown borough, Hunterdon County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 21, 2012.
  36. ^ Cerra, Michael F. "Forms of Government: Everything You've Always Wanted to Know, But Were Afraid to Ask", New Jersey State League of Municipalities. Accessed November 30, 2014.
  37. ^ "Forms of Municipal Government in New Jersey", p. 6. Rutgers University Center for Government Studies. Accessed June 3, 2015.
  38. ^ Mustac, Frank. "Challenger Cooper defeats Frenchtown's longtime incumbent mayor Sworen", Hunterdon County Democrat, November 8, 2011. Accessed November 10, 2011. "There’ll be a new mayor in the borough, and his name is Warren Cooper. Cooper, a Democrat, unseated longtime incumbent Ron Sworen, who at the end of his tenure will have served four consecutive terms for a total of 16 years."
  39. ^ Council Members, Frenchtown, NJ. Accessed August 21, 2013.
  40. ^ Staff. "Hunterdon County election results 2014", Hunterdon County Democrat, November 4, 2014. Accessed February 17, 2015.
  41. ^ Posted By Warren Cooper on Aug 28, 2013, Frenchtown, NJ. Accessed July 9, 2014. "On Friday, Aug. 23, Borough Council appointed Jack Opdyke to take the seat left vacant by the resignation of Robb Arent."
  42. ^ Plan Components Report, New Jersey Redistricting Commission, December 23, 2011. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  43. ^ 2015 New Jersey Citizen's Guide to Government, p. 57, New Jersey League of Women Voters. Accessed May 22, 2015.
  44. ^ Districts by Number for 2011-2020, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  45. ^ 2011 New Jersey Citizen's Guide to Government, p. 57, New Jersey League of Women Voters. Accessed May 22, 2015.
  46. ^ Directory of Representatives: New Jersey, United States House of Representatives. Accessed January 5, 2012.
  47. ^ About Cory Booker, United States Senate. Accessed January 26, 2015. "He now owns a home and lives in Newark's Central Ward community."
  48. ^ Biography of Bob Menendez, United States Senate, January 26, 2015. "He currently lives in Paramus and has two children, Alicia and Robert."
  49. ^ Senators of the 114th Congress from New Jersey. United States Senate. Accessed January 26, 2015. "Booker, Cory A. - (D - NJ) Class II; Menendez, Robert - (D - NJ) Class I"
  50. ^ Legislative Roster 2014-2015 Session, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed February 7, 2014.
  51. ^ District 23 Legislators, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed February 7, 2014.
  52. ^ "About the Governor". State of  
  53. ^ "About the Lieutenant Governor". State of  
  54. ^ About the Board, Hunterdon County, New Jersey. Accessed January 8, 2015.
  55. ^ John King, Hunterdon County, New Jersey. Accessed January 8, 2015.
  56. ^ Suzanne Lagay, Hunterdon County, New Jersey. Accessed January 8, 2015.
  57. ^ J. Matthew Holt, Hunterdon County, New Jersey. Accessed January 8, 2015.
  58. ^ John E. Lanza, Hunterdon County, New Jersey. Accessed January 8, 2015.
  59. ^ Robert G. Walton, Hunterdon County, New Jersey. Accessed January 8, 2015.
  60. ^ Hunterdon County Board of Chosen Freeholders, Hunterdon County, New Jersey. Accessed January 8, 2015.
  61. ^ Hunterdon County Clerk Mary H. Melfi, Hunterdon County, New Jersey. Accessed January 8, 2015.
  62. ^ Frederick W. Brown; Hunterdon County Sheriff, Hunterdon County, New Jersey. Accessed January 8, 2015.
  63. ^ Surrogate Susan J. Hoffman, Hunterdon County, New Jersey. Accessed January 8, 2015.
  64. ^ 2014 Elected Officials, Hunterdon County, New Jersey. Accessed January 8, 2015.
  65. ^ 2014 County and Municipal Guide ... Hunterdon County Now, Hunterdon County, New Jersey. Accessed January 8, 2015.
  66. ^ Voter Registration Summary - Hunterdon, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, March 23, 2011. Accessed November 14, 2012.
  67. ^ "Presidential General Election Results - November 6, 2012 - Hunterdon County" (PDF). New Jersey Department of Elections. March 15, 2013. Retrieved December 24, 2014. 
  68. ^ "Number of Registered Voters and Ballots Cast - November 6, 2012 - General Election Results - Hunterdon County" (PDF). New Jersey Department of Elections. March 15, 2013. Retrieved December 24, 2014. 
  69. ^ 2008 Presidential General Election Results: Hunterdon County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 23, 2008. Accessed November 14, 2012.
  70. ^ 2004 Presidential Election: Hunterdon County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 13, 2004. Accessed November 14, 2012.
  71. ^ "Governor - Hunterdon County" (PDF). New Jersey Department of Elections. January 29, 2014. Retrieved December 24, 2014. 
  72. ^ "Number of Registered Voters and Ballots Cast - November 5, 2013 - General Election Results - Hunterdon County" (PDF). New Jersey Department of Elections. January 29, 2014. Retrieved December 24, 2014. 
  73. ^ 2009 Governor: Hunterdon County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 31, 2009. Accessed November 14, 2012.
  74. ^ District information for Frenchtown School District, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed February 17, 2015.
  75. ^ Delaware Valley Regional School District 2014 Report Card Narrative, New Jersey Department of Education. Accessed February 17, 2015. "The Delaware Valley Regional High School District can be found in the heart of pastoral and beautiful Hunterdon County. The District serves students in grades nine through twelve who reside in the five municipalities that comprise our region: Alexandria Township, Frenchtown Borough, Holland Township, Kingwood Township, and Milford Borough."
  76. ^ About Us, Delaware Valley Regional High School. Accessed November 14, 2012. "Our high school, established in 1958-1959 for students residing in Alexandria, Frenchtown, Holland, Kingwood, and Milford, offers students a comprehensive academic program in preparation for a successful future."
  77. ^ Chief School Administrators/Sending Districts, Hunterdon County Superintendent of Schools. Accessed October 18, 2014.
  78. ^ Hunterdon County Mileage by Municipality and Jurisdiction, New Jersey Department of Transportation, May 2010. Accessed July 18, 2014.
  79. ^ James Agee (1909-1955)Chronology of his Life and Work, Agee Films. Accessed July 9, 2014. "1938 Spring - Moves to 27 Second Street, Frenchtown, New Jersey."
  80. ^ David Madden and Jeffrey J. Folks, ed. (1997). Remembering James Agee.  
  81. ^ Rich, Motoko. "Eat, Pray, Love. Then What? Get Married.", The New York Times, August 19, 2009. Accessed November 14, 2012. "'It is and isn’t a sequel,' Ms. Gilbert said in a telephone interview from near their home in Frenchtown, N.J."
  82. ^ Corbett, Sara. "One Hundred Artists Rolled Into One Man", The New York Times, December 16, 2011. Accessed August 21, 2013. "Shea Hembrey is tall and lanky with a wispy beard and dark hair that flops boyishly to either side of his face. He was born and reared in rural Arkansas, but these days he lives in the hamlet of Frenchtown, N. J., in the second-story apartment of a well-kept Victorian cottage on a street filled with the same."
  83. ^ Grimes, William. "Lois Hunt, Half of Popular Operatic Duo, Dies at 84", The New York Times, July 28, 2009. Accessed November 14, 2012. "Lois Hunt, whose operatic lyric soprano blended seamlessly with Earl Wrightson’s baritone in a partnership that lasted nearly 40 years and brought the classics of the American musical theater to audiences through concerts, tent musicals and record albums, died Sunday in Manhattan. She was 84 and lived in Frenchtown, N.J."
  84. ^ Cosdon, Christina K. "Kappler lands 2nd Invitational", St. Petersburg Times, March 30, 2003. Accessed August 12, 2007. "Anne Kursinski, 43, of Frenchtown, N.J., and Eros placed third for $26,000."
  85. ^ Harvey Spencer Lewis - Introduction. The Global Oneness Commitment. Accessed June 2, 2008.
  86. ^ Kieran, John. "Sports of the Times; The Golfer on Horseback.", The New York Times, March 23, 1931. Accessed November 14, 2012. "'I'm 32 years old. Be 33 in October. Born Oct. 5, 1898, at a place called Frenchtown in New Jersey, but we moved to Baltimore when I was pretty small.'"
  87. ^ Staff. "Pauch wins for the 72nd time at NES", The Times of Trenton, April 27, 2009. Accessed July 28, 2009. "Billy Pauch of Frenchtown proved just why he is the all-time leading winner at the New Egypt Speedway."
  88. ^ Weber, Bruce. "Anna Pump, Chef and Author Famed for Hamptons Store, Dies at 81", The New York Times, October 9, 2015. Accessed October 10, 2015. "She married Detlef Pump, who became a master stonemason, shortly after graduating from school, and they immigrated to the United States in 1960, settling in Frenchtown, N.J. They moved to the Hamptons in the late 1970s, after spending a two-week vacation there."
  89. ^ Bucks County and the Delaware Valley Alive, Hunter Publishing, 2010.

References

See also

People who were born in, residents of, or otherwise closely associated with Frenchtown include:

Notable people

Frenchtown is the northern terminus of Route 29, the western terminus of Route 12, and the southern terminus of Route 513.

As of May 2010, the borough had a total of 10.32 miles (16.61 km) of roadways, of which 7.50 miles (12.07 km) were maintained by the municipality, 2.36 miles (3.80 km) by Hunterdon County and 0.34 miles (0.55 km) by the New Jersey Department of Transportation and 0.12 miles (0.19 km) by the Delaware River Joint Toll Bridge Commission.[78]

Transportation

Public school students in ninth through twelfth grades attend the Delaware Valley Regional High School in Frenchtown, which serves students in western Hunterdon County. Students from Alexandria, Holland and Kingwood Townships along with the boroughs of Frenchtown and Milford attend the high school, which is part of the Delaware Valley Regional High School District.[75][76][77]

The Frenchtown School District serves public school students in pre-Kindergarten through eighth grade at Edith Ort Thomas Elementary School. As of the 2012-13 school year, the district's one school had an enrollment of 144 students and 15.9 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 9.06:1.[74]

Education

In the 2013 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 54.9% of the vote (284 cast), ahead of Democrat Barbara Buono with 42.7% (221 votes), and other candidates with 2.3% (12 votes), among the 533 ballots cast by the borough's 976 registered voters (16 ballots were spoiled), for a turnout of 54.6%.[71][72] In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 48.3% of the vote (247 ballots cast), ahead of Democrat Jon Corzine with 40.9% (209 votes), Independent Chris Daggett with 8.2% (42 votes) and other candidates with 1.4% (7 votes), among the 511 ballots cast by the borough's 943 registered voters, yielding a 54.2% turnout.[73]

[70] In the

As of March 23, 2011, there were a total of 931 registered voters in Frenchtown, of which 289 (31.0%) were registered as Democrats, 270 (29.0%) were registered as Republicans and 370 (39.7%) were registered as Unaffiliated. There were 2 voters registered to other parties.[66]

Politics

[65][64][63], 2018).Kingwood Township and Surrogate Susan J. Hoffman (R; [62], 2016)Alexandria Township Sheriff Fredrick W. Brown (R; [61] Constitutional officers elected on a countywide basis are County Clerk Mary H. Melfi (R; Flemington, 2017),[60][59], 2017).Hampton and Robert G. Walton (R; [58], 2016)Flemington John E. Lanza (R; [57], 2015),Clinton Town; R J. Matthew Holt ([56], 2016),Holland Township Freeholder Deputy Director Suzanne Lagay (R; [55], 2015),Raritan Township As of 2015, Hunterdon County's Freeholders are Freeholder Director John King (R; [54]

This article was sourced from Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. World Heritage Encyclopedia content is assembled from numerous content providers, Open Access Publishing, and in compliance with The Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR), Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., Public Library of Science, The Encyclopedia of Life, Open Book Publishers (OBP), PubMed, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and USA.gov, which sources content from all federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial government publication portals (.gov, .mil, .edu). Funding for USA.gov and content contributors is made possible from the U.S. Congress, E-Government Act of 2002.
 
Crowd sourced content that is contributed to World Heritage Encyclopedia is peer reviewed and edited by our editorial staff to ensure quality scholarly research articles.
 
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. World Heritage Encyclopedia™ is a registered trademark of the World Public Library Association, a non-profit organization.
 


Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from Project Gutenberg are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.