Gottgläubig

In Nazi Germany, Gottgläubig (literally, belief in God), was a Nazi religious movement of those who broke away from Christianity but kept their faith in a higher power or divine creator. The term implies someone who still believes in God, although without having any religious affiliation. Like the Communist Party in the USSR, the Nazis were not favourable toward religious institutions, but unlike the Communists, they did not promote or require atheism on the part of their membership. By the decree of the Reich Ministry of the Interior of 26 November 1936, this religious descriptor was officially recognized on government records. It was last recognized in the 1946 census of the French Occupation Zone.

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