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Grade I listed buildings in Mendip

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Title: Grade I listed buildings in Mendip  
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Subject: Grade I listed buildings in Sedgemoor, Grade I listed buildings in Taunton Deane, Grade I listed buildings in Somerset, Grade I listed buildings in Mendip, Listed buildings in England
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Grade I listed buildings in Mendip

Mendip is a local government district in the English county of Somerset. The Mendip district covers a largely rural area of 285 square miles (738 km2)[1] ranging from the Mendip Hills through on to the Somerset Levels. It has a population of approximately 11,000.[1] The administrative centre of the district is Shepton Mallet.

In the United Kingdom, the term listed building refers to a building or other structure officially designated as being of special architectural, historical or cultural significance; Grade I structures are those considered to be "buildings of exceptional interest".[2] Listing was begun by a provision in the Town and Country Planning Act 1947. Once listed, severe restrictions are imposed on the modifications allowed to a building's structure or its fittings. In England, the authority for listing under the Planning (Listed Buildings and Conservation Areas) Act 1990[3] rests with English Heritage, a non-departmental public body sponsored by the Department for Culture, Media and Sport; local authorities have a responsibility to regulate and enforce the planning regulations.

There are 90 Grade I listed buildings in Mendip. Most are Norman- or medieval-era churches, many of which are included in the Somerset towers, a collection of distinctive, mostly spireless Gothic church towers. The greatest concentrations of Grade I listed buildings are in Wells and Glastonbury. In Wells these are clustered around the 10th-century Cathedral Church of St Andrew, better known as Wells Cathedral, and the 13th-century Bishop's Palace.[4] Glastonbury is the site of the Abbey, where construction started in the 7th century,[5] and its associated buildings. The ruined St Michael's church, damaged in an earthquake of 1275,[6] stands on Glastonbury Tor, where the site shows evidence of occupation from Neolithic times and the Dark Ages.[7] The Chalice Well has been in use since Pre-Christian times.[8] Glastonbury Abbey had a wider influence outside the town: tithe barns were built at Pilton[9] and West Bradley[10] to hold tithes, and a Fish House[11] was built at Meare along with a summer residence for the Abbot (now Manor Farmhouse[12]).

Medieval structures include [14] Manor houses such as the 15th-century Seymours Court Farmhouse[15] at Beckington and The Old Manor at Croscombe. Mells Manor followed in the 16th century and in the 17th century Southill House[16] in Cranmore was built. Ston Easton Park[17] and Ammerdown House[18] in Kilmersdon were both completed in the 18th century. The most recent buildings included in the list are churches: the Church of St Peter at Hornblotton, built in 1872–74 by Sir Thomas Graham Jackson to replace a medieval church on the same site,[19] and Downside Abbey at Stratton-on-the-Fosse, more formally known as "The Basilica of St Gregory the Great at Downside", a Roman Catholic Benedictine monastery and the Senior House of the English Benedictine Congregation. The current buildings were started in the 19th century and are still unfinished.[20]

Buildings

See also

Notes

  1. ^ The date given is the date used by English Heritage as significant for the initial building or that of an important part in the structure's description.
  2. ^ Sometimes known as OSGB36, the grid reference is based on the British national grid reference system used by the Ordnance Survey.
  3. ^ The "List Entry Number" is a unique number assigned to each listed building/ scheduled monument by English Heritage.

References

  1. ^ a b "A Portrait of Mendip". Mendip District Council. Retrieved 19 May 2009. 
  2. ^ "What is a listed building?". Manchester City Council. Retrieved 8 December 2007. 
  3. ^ "Planning (Listed Buildings and Conservation Areas) Act 1990 (c. 9)". Ministry of Justice. Retrieved 17 December 2007. 
  4. ^ a b "The Bishop's Palace and Bishop's House". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 10 August 2013. 
  5. ^ a b "Glastonbury Abbey". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 10 August 2013. 
  6. ^ "Historical Earthquake Listing". British Geological Survey. Retrieved 25 December 2007. 
  7. ^ "The Glastonbury Tor Maze". About Glastonbury Tor. Retrieved 25 December 2007. 
  8. ^ a b "The Chalice Well". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 10 August 2013. 
  9. ^ a b "Former Tithe Barn in farmyard at Cumhill Farm". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 10 August 2013. 
  10. ^ a b "Court Barn". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 10 August 2013. 
  11. ^ a b "The Abbot's Fish House". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 10 August 2013. 
  12. ^ a b "Manor Farmhouse with attached range of outbuildings". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 10 August 2013. 
  13. ^ "Licence to crenellate Farleigh Hungerford Castle granted 1383 Nov 26". The Gatehouse. Retrieved 30 May 2009. 
  14. ^ "History". The George Inn. Retrieved 20 May 2009. 
  15. ^ a b "Seymours Court Farmhouse". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 10 August 2013. 
  16. ^ a b "The Old Manor". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 10 August 2013. 
  17. ^ a b "Ston Easton Park". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 10 August 2013. 
  18. ^ a b "Ammerdown House and stables. Now known as Ammerdown Study Centre". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 10 August 2013. 
  19. ^ a b "Church of St Peter". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 10 August 2013. 
  20. ^ a b "Abbey Church of St Gregory the Great, Downside Abbey". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 10 August 2013. 
  21. ^ "1 St Andrew Street". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 10 August 2013. 
  22. ^ "1 - 13 Vicars Close". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 10 August 2013. 
  23. ^ "14 - 27 Vicars Close". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 10 August 2013. 
  24. ^ "Abbey Tithe Barn, including attached wall to east". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 10 August 2013. 
  25. ^ "Abbot's Kitchen, Glastonbury Abbey". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 10 August 2013. 
  26. ^ "Bishop Burnell's Great Hall". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 10 August 2013. 
  27. ^ "Boundary Walls to 1 - 13 Vicars Close". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 10 August 2013. 
  28. ^ "Boundary walls to 14 - 27 Vicars Close". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 10 August 2013. 
  29. ^ "Brown's Gatehouse". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 10 August 2013. 
  30. ^ "Cathedral Church of St Andrew and chapter house and cloisters". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 10 August 2013. 
  31. ^ "Chapel of St Leonard, perimeter wall and gateway, Farleigh Hungerford Castle". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 10 August 2013. 
  32. ^ "Chapter House to Cathedral of St Andrew". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 10 August 2013. 
  33. ^ "Church of St Aldhelm". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 10 August 2013. 
  34. ^ "Church of All Saints". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 10 August 2013. 
  35. ^ "Church of All Saints". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 10 August 2013. 
  36. ^ "Church of All Saints". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 10 August 2013. 
  37. ^ "Church of St Andrew". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 10 August 2013. 
  38. ^ "Church of St Bartholomew". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 10 August 2013. 
  39. ^ "Church of St Benedict". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 10 August 2013. 
  40. ^ "Church of St Cuthbert". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 10 August 2013. 
  41. ^ "Church of St Dunstan". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 10 August 2013. 
  42. ^ "Church of St George". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 10 August 2013. 
  43. ^ "Church of St Giles". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 10 August 2013. 
  44. ^ "Church of St James". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 10 August 2013. 
  45. ^ "Church of St John the Baptist". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 10 August 2013. 
  46. ^ "Church of St John the Baptist". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 10 August 2013. 
  47. ^ "Church of St Lawrence". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 10 August 2013. 
  48. ^ "Church of St Lawrence". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 10 August 2013. 
  49. ^ "Church of St Leonard". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 10 August 2013. 
  50. ^ "Church of St Leonard". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 10 August 2013. 
  51. ^ "Church of St Margaret". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 10 August 2013. 
  52. ^ "Church of St Mary". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 10 August 2013. 
  53. ^ "Church of St Mary". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 10 August 2013. 
  54. ^ "Church of St Mary". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 10 August 2013. 
  55. ^ "Church of St Mary". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 10 August 2013. 
  56. ^ "Church of St Mary". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 10 August 2013. 
  57. ^ "Church of St Mary, causeway bridge and gates". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 10 August 2013. 
  58. ^ "Church of St Mary Magdalene". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 10 August 2013. 
  59. ^ "Church of St Mary Magdalene". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 11 August 2013. 
  60. ^ "Church of St Mary Magdalene". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 11 August 2013. 
  61. ^ "Church of St Mary the Virgin". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 10 August 2013. 
  62. ^ "Church of St Mary the Virgin". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 10 August 2013. 
  63. ^ "Church of St Matthew". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 10 August 2013. 
  64. ^ "Church of St Michael". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 10 August 2013. 
  65. ^ "Church of St Nicholas". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 10 August 2013. 
  66. ^ "Church of St Peter". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 10 August 2013. 
  67. ^ "Church of St Peter and St Paul". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 10 August 2013. 
  68. ^ "Church of St Peter and St Paul". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 10 August 2013. 
  69. ^ "Church of the Holy Trinity". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 10 August 2013. 
  70. ^ "Church of the Holy Trinity". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 10 August 2013. 
  71. ^ "Church of St Vigor". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 10 August 2013. 
  72. ^ "Churchyard cross in churchyard south of porch Church of St Mary Magdalene". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 10 August 2013. 
  73. ^ "Churchyard cross in the churchyard about 9 metres south of south aisle, Church of St Nicholas". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 10 August 2013. 
  74. ^ "Cloisters to Cathedral Church of St Andrew". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 10 August 2013. 
  75. ^ "Farleigh Hungerford Castle". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 10 August 2013. 
  76. ^ "Former Rook Lane Congregational Chapel". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 10 August 2013. 
  77. ^ "Gatehouse and boundary wall with bridge over moat". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 10 August 2013. 
  78. ^ "Gatehouse to west of Manor Farmhouse". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 10 August 2013. 
  79. ^ "George Hotel and Pilgrims' Inn". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 10 August 2013. 
  80. ^ "Mells Manor and garden walls to rear". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 10 August 2013. 
  81. ^ "Penniless Porch". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 10 August 2013. 
  82. ^ "Southill House and outbuildings". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 10 August 2013. 
  83. ^ "St John's Priory with front boundary wall and railings". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 10 August 2013. 
  84. ^ "St Michaels church tower, Tor Hill". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 10 August 2013. 
  85. ^ "The Bishop's Barn". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 10 August 2013. 
  86. ^ "The Bishop's Chapel and the Bishop's Palace". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 10 August 2013. 
  87. ^ "The Bishop's Eye". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 10 August 2013. 
  88. ^ "The Blue House". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 10 August 2013. 
  89. ^ "The chain gate with approach staircase". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 10 August 2013. 
  90. ^ "The Gatehouse". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 10 August 2013. 
  91. ^ "The George Inn". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 10 August 2013. 
  92. ^ "The Old Deanery". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 10 August 2013. 
  93. ^ "Old Deanery Court with link wall along east side". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 10 August 2013. 
  94. ^ "Gatehouse and south boundary wall to the Old Deanery". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 10 August 2013. 
  95. ^ "The Tribunal". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 10 August 2013. 
  96. ^ "The Vicars' Chapel". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 10 August 2013. 
  97. ^ "The Vicars' Hall including number 28". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 10 August 2013. 
  98. ^ "The well house about 35 metres north of Bishop's Palace". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 10 August 2013. 
  99. ^ "Tithe Barn in farmyard at Manor Farm". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 10 August 2013. 

External links

  • Listed building section at Mendip District Council
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