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Grade I listed buildings in North Somerset

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Title: Grade I listed buildings in North Somerset  
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Subject: Grade I listed buildings in Sedgemoor, Grade I listed buildings in Taunton Deane, Grade I listed buildings in Bath and North East Somerset, Grade I listed buildings in Mendip, Grade I listed buildings in Somerset
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Grade I listed buildings in North Somerset

North Somerset is a unitary authority in the ceremonial county of Somerset, England. In the United Kingdom, the term listed building refers to a building or other structure officially designated as being of special architectural, historical or cultural significance; Grade I structures are those considered to be "buildings of exceptional interest".[1] Listing was begun by a provision in the Town and Country Planning Act 1947. Once listed, severe restrictions are imposed on the modifications allowed to a building's structure or its fittings. In England, the authority for listing under the Planning (Listed Buildings and Conservation Areas) Act 1990[2] rests with English Heritage, a non-departmental public body sponsored by the Department for Culture, Media and Sport; local authorities have a responsibility to regulate and enforce the planning regulations.

North Somerset constitutes part of the ceremonial county of Somerset. As a unitary authority, North Somerset is administered independently of the non-metropolitan county of Somerset. Its administrative headquarters are located in the town hall of Weston-super-Mare. North Somerset includes areas that were once part of Somerset before the creation of Avon in 1974.[3]

There are 37 Grade I listed buildings in North Somerset, including the Clifton Suspension Bridge, which joins North Somerset to Bristol and Clevedon Pier. Of the listed buildings, manor houses include Clevedon Court, built in the 14th century, and from the 15th century, Ashton Court and Nailsea Court. Somerset has many religious structures; the largest number are from the Norman or medieval eras. Some of the churches are included in the Somerset towers, a collection of distinctive, mostly spireless Gothic church towers.

Buildings

See also

Notes

  1. ^ The date given is the date used by English Heritage as significant for the initial building or that of an important part in the structure's description.
  2. ^ Sometimes known as OSGB36, the grid reference is based on the British national grid reference system used by the Ordnance Survey.
  3. ^ The "List Entry Number" is a unique number assigned to each listed building/ scheduled monument by English Heritage.

References

  1. ^ "What is a listed building?". Manchester City Council. Retrieved 2007-12-08. 
  2. ^ "Planning (Listed Buildings and Conservation Areas) Act 1990 (c. 9)". Ministry of Justice. Retrieved 2007-12-17. 
  3. ^ "The Avon (Structural Change) Order 1995". Her Majesty's Stationery Office. Retrieved 2007-12-09. 
  4. ^ "All Saints Church". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 21 July 2013. 
  5. ^ "Ashton Court mansion and stables". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 21 July 2013. 
  6. ^ "Barn circa 50 metres north west of priory church". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 21 July 2013. 
  7. ^ "Church of All Saints". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 21 July 2013. 
  8. ^ "Church of All Saints". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 21 July 2013. 
  9. ^ "Church of St Andrew". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 21 July 2013. 
  10. ^ "Church of St Andrew". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 21 July 2013. 
  11. ^ "Church of St Andrew". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 21 July 2013. 
  12. ^ "Church of St Andrew". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 21 July 2013. 
  13. ^ "Church of St Bridget". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 21 July 2013. 
  14. ^ "Church of St James". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 21 July 2013. 
  15. ^ "Church of St John the Baptist". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 21 July 2013. 
  16. ^ "St Mary's Church". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 21 July 2013. 
  17. ^ "Church of St Mary". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 21 July 2013. 
  18. ^ "Church of St Michael". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 21 July 2013. 
  19. ^ "Church of St Mary". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 21 July 2013. 
  20. ^ "Church of St Michael". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 21 July 2013. 
  21. ^ "Church of St Paul". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 21 July 2013. 
  22. ^ "Church of St Peter". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 21 July 2013. 
  23. ^ "Church of St Peter & St Paul". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 21 July 2013. 
  24. ^ "Church of St Peter & St Paul". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 21 July 2013. 
  25. ^ "Church of St Quiricus & St Julietta". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 21 July 2013. 
  26. ^ "Church of St Saviour". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 21 July 2013. 
  27. ^ "Church of the Holy Trinity". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 21 July 2013. 
  28. ^ "Church of the Holy Trinity". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 21 July 2013. 
  29. ^ "Clevedon Court". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 21 July 2013. 
  30. ^ "Clifton Suspension Bridge". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 21 July 2013. 
  31. ^ "East cloister wall". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 21 July 2013. 
  32. ^ "Infirmary". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 21 July 2013. 
  33. ^ "Nailsea Court". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 21 July 2013. 
  34. ^ "Priory Church". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 21 July 2013. 
  35. ^ "The pier, including the tollhouse". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 21 July 2013. 
  36. ^ "Gatehouse, gates, mounting block and wall running south for circa 20 metres". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 21 July 2013. 
  37. ^ "The Refectory and The Vicarage". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 21 July 2013. 
  38. ^ "Tyntesfield house, servants wing and chapel". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 21 July 2013. 
  39. ^ "West wall of chapter house range". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 21 July 2013. 

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