World Library  
Flag as Inappropriate
Email this Article

Grammy Award for Best Classical Performance - Instrumental Soloist or Soloists (with or without orchestra)

Article Id: WHEBN0008806016
Reproduction Date:

Title: Grammy Award for Best Classical Performance - Instrumental Soloist or Soloists (with or without orchestra)  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Language: English
Subject: 13th Annual Grammy Awards, 9th Annual Grammy Awards, 10th Annual Grammy Awards, 11th Annual Grammy Awards, 12th Annual Grammy Awards, Eastman Wind Ensemble, Grammy Award for Best Instrumental Performance
Collection:
Publisher: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Publication
Date:
 

Grammy Award for Best Classical Performance - Instrumental Soloist or Soloists (with or without orchestra)

The Grammy Award for Best Classical Performance - Instrumental Soloist or Soloists (with or without orchestra) was awarded from 1967 to 1971 and in 1987. Outside of these years the award has been divided into the Grammy Award for Best Instrumental Soloist(s) Performance (with orchestra) and the Grammy Award for Best Instrumental Soloist Performance (without orchestra).

Years reflect the year in which the Grammy Awards were presented, for works released in the previous year.

Recipients

1967–1971

Nominees for the 9th Grammy Awards (1967) included Julian Bream for Baroque Guitar, pianist John Browning for Prokofiev: Concert No. 1 in D Flat Major for Piano; Concerto No. 2 in G Minor for Piano (conducted by Erich Leinsdorf with the Boston Symphony Orchestra), pianist Raymond Lewenthal for Operatic Liszt, violinist Yehudi Menuhin for Elgar: Concerto for Violin, Ivan Moravec for Chopin: Nocturnes, Arthur Rubinstein for Rubinstein and Chopin (featuring Frédéric Chopin's Bolero, Tarantelle, Fantaisie in F minor and Trois nouvelles études), violinist Isaac Stern for Dvořák: Concerto in A Minor for Violin (conducted by Eugene Ormandy with the Philadelphia Orchestra), and Australian classical guitarist John Williams for Rodrigo: Concierto de Aranjuez for Guitar and Orchestra/Castelnuovo-Tedesco: Concerto in D Major for Guitar (conducted by Ormandy and the Philadelphia Orchestra).[1] Bream received the award for Baroque Guitar, which featured pieces by Johann Sebastian Bach, Gaspar Sanz, Silvius Leopold Weiss and other composers.[2]


1987

References

This article was sourced from Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. World Heritage Encyclopedia content is assembled from numerous content providers, Open Access Publishing, and in compliance with The Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR), Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., Public Library of Science, The Encyclopedia of Life, Open Book Publishers (OBP), PubMed, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and USA.gov, which sources content from all federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial government publication portals (.gov, .mil, .edu). Funding for USA.gov and content contributors is made possible from the U.S. Congress, E-Government Act of 2002.
 
Crowd sourced content that is contributed to World Heritage Encyclopedia is peer reviewed and edited by our editorial staff to ensure quality scholarly research articles.
 
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. World Heritage Encyclopedia™ is a registered trademark of the World Public Library Association, a non-profit organization.
 


Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from Project Gutenberg are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.