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Green Party faction (Bundestag)

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Green Party faction (Bundestag)


The German Green Party (Bündnis 90/Die Grünen) has been present in the German parliament (Bundestag) continuously since March 29, 1983 as a parliamentarian party.

Contents

  • The faction in the 10th Bundestag, 1983–1987 1
  • The faction in the 11th Bundestag, 1987–1990 2
  • The Green group in the 12th Bundestag, 1990–1994 3
  • The faction in the 13th Bundestag, 1994–1998 4
  • The faction in the 14th Bundestag, 1998–2002 5
  • The faction in the 15th Bundestag, 2002–2005 6
  • The faction in the 16th Bundestag, 2005–2009 7

The faction in the 10th Bundestag, 1983–1987

Scoring 5.6% in the federal parliamental elections in 1983, the Waltraud Schoppe, Antje Vollmer, Christa Nickels, Heidemarie Dann and Erika Hickel.

The members of the faction were:

The faction in the 11th Bundestag, 1987–1990

In the 1987 parliamental elections, the Green Party manages to increase its share of votes to 8.3%, gaining 44 parliament seats in the process. When the East German parliament, the Volkskammer, which was freely elected on March 18, 1990 for the first time, is disbanded in the process of the German reunification, another 7 seats are added as 7 members of the 21-member Volkskammer faction of the Green Party, elected by their peers, enter the Bundestag.

The members of the faction are:

The Green group in the 12th Bundestag, 1990–1994

In 1990, elections are held separately in former East and West Germany; in West Germany, the Green Party does not manage to gain enough votes to enter parliament, only scoring 4.8% instead of the necessary 5%, but in East Germany, the Greens gain a 6.1% share of the votes and 8 seats in the Bundestag. While a green presence in the 12th Bundestag is thus secured, the Greens cannot form a faction, instead remaining a "group" (with less rights and a smaller budget).

The members of the faction are:

The faction in the 13th Bundestag, 1994–1998

4 years later, in 1994, the Greens manage to recover from their losses again, achieving 7.3% and entering the parliament with 48 seats. Antje Vollmer, long-time member of the faction, is elected as first Green Vice President of the Bundestag with the help of the CDU faction.

The members of the faction include:

The faction in the 14th Bundestag, 1998–2002

In 1998, the Green Party suffers slight losses, dropping down to 6.7%, but still manages to gain 47 seats in a larger parliament. For the first time it is possible to form a red-green government coalition with the election-winning SPD.

The members of the faction are:

The faction in the 15th Bundestag, 2002–2005

While the ruling SPD suffered substantial losses during the 2002 parliamental elections and only barely managed to become the biggest faction in the Bundestag, the Green Party gained 1.9 points compared to the 1998 elections, for a total of 8.6%, yielding 55 seats.

The members of the faction are:

The faction in the 16th Bundestag, 2005–2009

The ruling SPD/Green Party suffered losses during the 2005 parliamental elections leading to a Grand Coalition between the SPD and the CDU/CSU. The Green Party lost four seats to go from 55 to 51 and went into opposition with the FDP and the Left Party.

The members of the faction are:

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