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Guardian of Scotland

 

Guardian of Scotland

Great Seal appointed for the Government of the Realm after death of King Alexander III.

The Guardians of Scotland were the de facto heads of state of Scotland[1] during the First Interregnum of 1290–1292, and the Second Interregnum of 1296–1306. During the many years of minority in Scotland's subsequent history, there were many guardians of Scotland and the post was a significant constitutional feature in the course of development for politics in the country.

Contents

  • Guardians of Scotland during the First Interregnum 1290–1292 1
  • Guardians of Scotland during the Second Interregnum 1296–1306 2
  • Guardians during the minority and reign of David II 3
  • See also 4
  • References 5
  • External links 6

Guardians of Scotland during the First Interregnum 1290–1292

In a letter (written in Old French) from the Scots Parliament of 1290, sitting at Birgham, confirming the Treaty of Salisbury, the guardians of Scotland are listed as:[2]

"... Guillaume de Seint Andreu et Robert de Glasgu evesques, Johan Comyn et James Seneschal de Escoce, gardeins du reaume de Escoce..."

English translation: "William [Fraser] of St Andrews and Robert [Wishart] of Glasgow bishops, John Comyn and James the Steward of Scotland, guardians of the kingdom of Scotland".

Guardians of Scotland during the Second Interregnum 1296–1306

Guardians during the minority and reign of David II

See also

References

  1. ^ Barrow, G. W. S. (2005). Robert Bruce and the community of the realm of Scotland. Edinburgh University Press. p. 38.  
  2. ^ "Margaret: Manuscript - 1290, 14 March, Birgham - Parliamentary Records - Letters: confirmation of the treaty of Salisbury" (in Old French and with modern English translation).  
  3. ^ G. W. S. Barrow, Robert Bruce and the Community of the Realm of Scotland (2005) p. 189.
  • Mack, James Logan (1926). The Border Line. Pub. Oliver & Boyd. pp. 317–322.
  • McNaught, Duncan (1912). Kilmaurs Parish and Burgh. Pub. A.Gardner. p. 9.

External links

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