World Library  
Flag as Inappropriate
Email this Article

Highland Village, Texas

Article Id: WHEBN0000135773
Reproduction Date:

Title: Highland Village, Texas  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Language: English
Subject: Denton County, Texas, United States House of Representatives elections in Texas, 2012, Denton County Transportation Authority, Dallas–Fort Worth metroplex, Farm to Market Road 407
Collection:
Publisher: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Publication
Date:
 

Highland Village, Texas

Highland Village, Texas
City
Location of Highland Village in Denton County, Texas
Location of Highland Village in Denton County, Texas
Coordinates:
Country United States
State Texas
County Denton
Municipal incorporation February 14, 1963 (1963-02-14)
Government
 • Type Council-Manager
 • City Council Mayor Patrick Davis
Michelle Schwolert
Charlotte Wilcox
Louis E. Robichaux, IV
Frederick Busche
John McGee
William Meek
 • City Manager Michael Leavitt
Area
 • Total 6.4 sq mi (16.6 km2)
 • Land 5.5 sq mi (14.3 km2)
 • Water 0.9 sq mi (2.3 km2)
Elevation 554 ft (169 m)
Population (2010)
 • Total 15,056
 • Density 2,400/sq mi (910/km2)
Time zone Central (CST) (UTC-6)
 • Summer (DST) CDT (UTC-5)
ZIP code 75077
Area code(s) 972
FIPS code 48-33848[1]
GNIS feature ID 1337748[2]
Website .org.highlandvillagewww

Highland Village is a city in Denton County, Texas, United States. It is a suburb of Dallas, hugging the south side of the far western branch of Lewisville Lake. As of the 2010 United States Census the city's population was 15,056.[3]

Contents

  • History 1
  • Geography 2
  • Government 3
  • Demographics 4
  • Transportation 5
  • Arts and cultural life 6
  • Education 7
  • Notes 8
  • Climate 9
  • References 10
  • External links 11

History

Highland Village incorporated as a city February 1963.[4] It included 516 residents in the 1970 census, but the opening of the Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport helped spur massive growth in the city's population: 3,246 in 1980, 7,027 in 1990, 12,173 in 2000, and 15,056 in 2010. The city remains a primarily residential area, though more business development is occurring.

Geography

Highland Village is located at (33.087940, -97.055874).[5] According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 6.4 square miles (17 km2), of which 5.5 square miles (14 km2) is land and 0.9 square miles (2.3 km2), or 13.88%, is water.

Government

The City of Highland Village mayor and city council commissioned the development of a new logo in 2007, to replace the familiar red, white, and blue logo in use since the 1970s. Citizen reaction to spending taxpayer dollars on this venture has been decidedly mixed.

In the ten-year period from fiscal year 2002 to fy 2012, the Highland Village City Council negotiated and implemented commercial development projects that resulted in sales tax revenues booming from $430,758 in 2002 to $2,076,510 in 2012 (a 482% growth). The number is expected to take another significant jump when Whole Foods Market opens its doors in late 2014 and creates a new draw for miles around.

Demographics

As of the 2010 United States Census, there were 15,602 people residing in the city. The population density was 2,736 people per square mile. The racial makeup of the city was 90.7% White, 2.6% African American, 0.40% Native American, 3.1% Asian, 0.1% Pacific Islander, and 2% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 6.3% of the population. There were 4,843 households.[3]

Transportation

Highland Village voted to become a member of the Denton County Transportation Authority (DCTA) in September 2003. It is currently served with Commuter Express coach service to Denton and downtown Dallas. DCTA initiated bus service in Highland Village in January 2008. In 2011, Highland Village/Lewisville Lake station opened as a commuter rail station on DCTA's A-train.[8]

Arts and cultural life

Highland Village hosts an annual hot air balloon festival sponsored by local Lions Clubs. Celebrate Highland Village, formerly known as Highland Village Days, is an annual event in August that includes a fireworks show, 1K and 5K runs, live music, and a family fishing in a stocked pond. There is also a city fireworks show and music festival called Red White and Blue festival.

Education

Highland Village is served by the Lewisville Independent School District, which has three elementary schools and one middle school located in the city. Edward S. Marcus High School, located in Flower Mound but near Highland Village, is the city's principal high school.

Notes

  1. ^ "American FactFinder".  
  2. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names".  
  3. ^ a b Census 2010.
  4. ^ Falcon et al. 2004, p. 39.
  5. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990".  
  6. ^ "Annual Estimates of the Resident Population for Incorporated Places: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2014". Retrieved June 4, 2015. 
  7. ^ "Census of Population and Housing". Census.gov. Retrieved June 4, 2015. 
  8. ^ Peterson 2011.

Climate

The climate in this area is characterized by hot, humid summers and generally mild to cool winters. According to the Köppen Climate Classification system, Highland Village has a humid subtropical climate, abbreviated "Cfa" on climate maps.[1]

References

  1. ^ Climate Summary for Highland Village, Texas
  • Falcon, Pat; Thompson, Sue; Gentry, Peggy; Faile, Shirley Bradham; Rader, Jennifer (2004). A History and Heritage of Highland Village.  
  • "Highland Village (city), Texas".  
  • Peterson, Matt (June 20, 2011). "A-train railway begins rolling, carrying commuters from Denton to Carrollton". The Dallas Morning News. Retrieved June 20, 2011. 

External links

  • City of Highland Village official website
  • The Cross Timbers Gazette, local newspaper
  • Lewisville Independent School District
This article was sourced from Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. World Heritage Encyclopedia content is assembled from numerous content providers, Open Access Publishing, and in compliance with The Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR), Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., Public Library of Science, The Encyclopedia of Life, Open Book Publishers (OBP), PubMed, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and USA.gov, which sources content from all federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial government publication portals (.gov, .mil, .edu). Funding for USA.gov and content contributors is made possible from the U.S. Congress, E-Government Act of 2002.
 
Crowd sourced content that is contributed to World Heritage Encyclopedia is peer reviewed and edited by our editorial staff to ensure quality scholarly research articles.
 
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. World Heritage Encyclopedia™ is a registered trademark of the World Public Library Association, a non-profit organization.
 


Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from Project Gutenberg are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.