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Hogtie

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Hogtie

A calf hogtied while being branded on a ranch.

The hogtie is a method of tying the limbs together, rendering the subject immobile and helpless. Originally, it was applied to pigs (hence the name) and other young four-legged animals.[1]

Contents

  • Details 1
  • Use in torture 2
  • Figurative use 3
  • See also 4
  • References 5

Details

The hogtie when used on pigs and cattle has it where three of the four limbs are tied together, as tying all four together is difficult and can result in harm to the animal. When performed on a human, however, a hogtie is any position that results in the arms and legs being bound, both tied behind the person and then connecting the hands and feet.

Use in torture

A variation of the hogtie has been used to torture and kill: the hands are tied behind the back and the feet are tied together, with one end of the rope forming a noose around the victim's neck. The tension on the neck-rope can only be relieved if the victim keeps their neck, back and legs arched; eventually, the victim tires and strangles.

Figurative use

The term may also apply figuratively to an instance where a person has said or done something which has unpleasant consequences, and from which they are unable to escape.

See also

Hogtied with handcuffs

References

  1. ^ http://www.kimbacan.com/HTML/Gallery/rodeo%20web/hogtied_steer.jpg
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