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Horse-Shoe Robinson

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Title: Horse-Shoe Robinson  
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Subject: John P. Kennedy, 1835 novels, American Revolutionary War novels, Banastre Tarleton, List of American novelists
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Horse-Shoe Robinson

Horse-Shoe Robinson
Major Butler and Horseshoe Robinson
Author John P. Kennedy
Country United States
Language English
Publisher Philadelphia: Carey, Lea & Blanchard / New York: Wiley and Long
Publication date
1835
Pages 2 vol. (1835 U.S.); 3 vol. (1835 U.K.)

Horse-Shoe Robinson: A Tale of the Tory Ascendency is an 1835 novel by John P. Kennedy that was a popular seller in its day.[1][2]

The novel was Kennedy's second, and proved to be his most popular. It is a work of historical romance of the American Revolution, set in the western mountain areas of the Carolinas and Virginia,[3] culminating at the Battle of Kings Mountain.[4][5]

The primary characters of the novel include Francis Marion, Banastre Tarleton, General Charles Corwallis, Horseshoe Robinson (so named because he was originally a blacksmith), Mary Musgrove and her lover John Ramsay, Henry and Mildred Lyndsay (patriots), Mildred's lover Arthur Butler (who she secretly marries), and Habershaw with his gang of rouges and Indians.[6]

Play

The novel was adapted for the stage a number of times, but the best known were by Charles Dance in 1836, which starred actor

  • Horse Shoe Robinson: A Tale of the Tory Ascendency ("Revised Edition", G.P. Putnam and Sons, New York, 1872) (via Google books)
  • 1835 English edition, Vol. 1 of 3 (London: Richard Bentley) (1835), Vol. 2, Vol. 3.

External links

  1. ^ Hart, James D. The Popular Book: A History of America's Literary Taste, p. 305 (1951)
  2. ^ (July 1835) Literary Notices (book review), The Knickerbocker, Vol. VI, No. 1, p. 71
  3. ^ Lemon, Armistead. Summary, in Documenting the American South website, Retrieved 8 December 2014
  4. ^ (November 1835). Critical Notices (book review), The Western Monthly Magazine, p. 350
  5. ^ (September 1835). Miscellaneous Notices (book review), The American Quarterly Review, Vol. 18, pp. 240-42
  6. ^ Warner, Charles Dudley, ed. Library of the World's Best Literature, Vol. XXX, p.269 (1898)
  7. ^ Burt, Daniel S. The Chronology of American Literature, p. 205 (2004)
  8. ^ Bank, Rosemarie. Frontier Melodrama, in Ogden, Dunbar H. et al., Theatre West: Image and Impact, pp. 151-52 (1990)
  9. ^ Hischak, Thomas S. The Oxford Companion to American Theatre, p. 317 (2004)

References

[9][8][7]

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