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Horseshoe arch

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Title: Horseshoe arch  
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Subject: Islamic architecture, Simon Attias Synagogue, Torre de Belén, Neo-Mudéjar, Jubilee Synagogue
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Horseshoe arch

Horseshoe arch
Horseshoe arches inside the Mosque of Uqba, in Kairouan, Tunisia

The horseshoe arch, also called the Moorish arch and the Keyhole arch, is the emblematic arch of Islamic architecture. They were formerly constructed in Visigothic Spain. Horseshoe arches can take rounded, pointed or lobed form.

Horseshoe arches are known from pre-Islamic [2] This style of horsehoe arch then spread all over the Calliphate and adjacent areas, and was adopted by the successor Muslim emirates of the peninsula, the taifas, as well as by the Almoravids, Almohads and the Nasrid Kingdom of Granada, although also lobed, round, pointed and multifoilde arches were also used at that time. The Mozarabs also adopted this style of arch into their architecture and illuminated manuscripts.

Horseshoe arches were also used in the [2] Mudéjar style, developed from the 12th to the 17th centuries, continued the tradition of horseshoe arches in the Iberian Peninsula which had been started in the 7th century by the Visigoths.

In addition to their use across the Islamic world, horseshoe arches became popular in Western countries at the time of the Moorish Revival. They were widely used in Moorish revival synagogues.

References

  1. ^ Andrew Petersen: "Dictionary of Islamic Architecture", Routledge, 1999, ISBN 0-415-21332-0, p. 24
  2. ^ a b http://archnet.org/library/dictionary/entry.jsp?entry_id=DIA0025&mode=full
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