World Library  
Flag as Inappropriate
Email this Article

Hull FC

Article Id: WHEBN0011305648
Reproduction Date:

Title: Hull FC  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Language: English
Subject: Ben Galea, Ryan McGoldrick, Shannon McDonnell, Iafeta Paleaaesina, Brett Seymour, Daniel Holdsworth (rugby league), Jason Crookes, Russ Walker (rugby league), Dean Treister, Joe Arundel
Collection:
Publisher: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Publication
Date:
 

Hull FC

This article is about the rugby league football club. For the association football team, see Hull City A.F.C..
Hull FC
Full name Hull Rugby League Football Club
Nickname(s) Airlie Birds, Black and Whites, The Cream
Website www.hullfc.com
Founded 1865;  (1865)
Ground KC Stadium,
Kingston upon Hull
(Capacity 25,404)
Key people England Adam Pearson (Chair)
England Lee Radford (Coach)
England Gareth Ellis (Captain)
League Super League
XVIII position 6th
Championships 6
Challenge Cups 3
World Club Champions 0
Home colours
Away colours
Current season

Hull Football Club, commonly referred to as Hull or Hull FC, is a professional rugby league football club established in 1865 and based in Hull, East Riding of Yorkshire, England. The club plays in the Super League competition. Hull FC were one of the founding members of the Northern Rugby Football Union which was formed in 1895 in Huddersfield, making them one of the world's first twenty-two rugby league clubs. Later that year they moved to the Hull Athletic Club's ground at The Boulevard, Airlie Street, which gave rise to their nickname "The Airlie Birds". Traditionally people from the west side of Hull support Hull FC while Hull Kingston Rovers are supported by the east half, the 'border' being regarded as the River Hull. Old Faithful is a traditional Hull terrace song. The team shares the KC Stadium with association football side Hull City A.F.C.. Their mascot is "The Airlie Bird" and officially carries the sponsors name, currently P&O Ferries.

History

Early years

Formed by a group of ex-schoolboys from York, most notably Anthony Bradley, who had been at Rugby School, in 1865. The founders used to meet at the Young Men's Fellowship, at St. Mary’s Church in Lowgate. The vicar at that time was the Reverend Scott and his 5 sons made up the nucleus of the team. The club immediately took on members who were plumbers and glaziers.

Soon another team, Hull White Star, was formed and the two clubs merged. Hull Football Club was one of the first clubs in the north of England to join the Rugby Football Union.

Hull, then nicknamed the All Blacks, were one of the initial 22 clubs to form the Northern Union after the acrimonious split from the Rugby Football Union in 1895. The club moved from East Hull to the Hull Athletic Club at the Boulevard in 1895, and subsequently played their first ever match there in September of that year. 8,000 people turned out to witness the first club's match in which Hull beat Liversedge.

The early years of the Northern Union saw Hull prosper, and their black and white irregular hooped jerseys became one of the most famous and feared strips in the league. Between 1908–10, Hull lost three consecutive Rugby League Challenge Cup finals, and has in fact lost in more major finals than anyone else.

In 1913, they paid a world record £600, plus £14 per match, to Hunslet for Billy Batten, one of only seventeen players, and the only representative from Hull FC, so far inducted into the British Rugby League Hall of Fame. A year later the Airlie Birds won their first Challenge Cup, beating Huddersfield in the semi-final and Wakefield Trinity in the final. Playing alongside Billy on that day was John "Jack" Harrison VC, MC, the only professional sportsman to win the Victoria Cross and the Military Cross, the holder of the club record for most tries in a season.

Australian Jim Devereux became the first player to score 100 tries for Hull.[1]

In 1920, Batten was once again key in Hull's first ever Championship final, scoring the only try in the 3–2 victory over Huddersfield.

The early-1920s were bittersweet years for the club. In 1921, Hull won the Yorkshire Cup but lost the county championship, both against rivals Hull Kingston Rovers. Hull couldn’t match the successes of 1914, losing a further two consecutive cup finals in 1922–23 to Rochdale Hornets and Leeds respectively, but they managed to win the Yorkshire Cup and finish top of the league.

In the early 1930s, Hull had a full back and goal kicker called Joe Oliver. Oliver was so dependable with the boot that the crowd at one match spontaneously started singing the Gene Autry song, Old Faithful at him. Hull supporters adopted the song as their battle cry from then on.

Hull's record attendance was set in 1936 when 28,798 turned up for the visit of Leeds for a third round Challenge cup match.

Post World War Two

The 1952 Kangaroos visited the Boulevard on Monday 8 September. They had opened their tour with a victory at Keighley two days earlier, and they continued their winning run with a 28–0 victory over Hull.

In 1954, the black Welshman Roy Francis became the first black professional coach in any British team sport, when he coached Hull.

Hull team won the league championship in 1956 when Colin Hutton kicked a last-minute penalty in the final against Halifax at Maine Road, Manchester. Hull won the play-offs again in 1958, against Workington Town. They also won the European Club championship in 1957 and lost in the cup finals at Wembley in 1959 and 1960. These triumphs healed the wound of two successive Yorkshire Cup final defeats in 1955 and 1957. They lost in two further Challenge Cup finals to Wigan and Wakefield Trinity in 1959 and 1960. All these reverses, when one hand had been grasping so many trophies, gave Hull a steely resolve and a thirst for success.

Johnny Whiteley became player coach in October 1963. When Roy Francis retired as Hull FC coach in 1965, Whiteley took over as coach. Hull F.C. lost to Wakefield Trinity 17–10 victory in the 1968 Rugby Football League Championship final at Headingley on 4 May 1968. Francis resigned in 1970 to coach Hull Kingston Rovers. Ivor Watts was then appointed coach from 1970–1971 of which Hull won 28 matches and lost 17.

With the coaching appointment of Arthur Bunting in 1978, Hull began a period of dominance. Hull won all of their 26 Division Two matches in 1978–79, the only time a club has won all of its league matches in a season and returning to the top flight. The Airlie Birds lost the 1980 Challenge Cup final against Hull KR 10–5 and have never won at Wembley since. It was reputed that a makeshift sign was left on the A63 (the major westerly road out of Hull) that read "last one out turn the lights off!" due to most of the city travelling to Wembley for the final. In 1982, Hull, crushed by Widnes in the Premiership final, avenged the defeat with an 18–9 Challenge Cup replay win.

Hull eventually won the league in 1983 and also reached the Premiership final, the Challenge Cup final and the Yorkshire Cup final, but the latter trophy would be their only reward from the three finals. They lost to Featherstone Rovers at Wembley in one of the great Challenge Cup final upsets and they also lost the Premiership final three years running.[2]

The signing of Australian Peter Sterling, a 2006 inductee into the Australian Rugby League Hall of Fame, maintained Hull’s strength, and Bunting’s men went to their third successive Yorkshire Cup beating Hull KR 29–12, but were edged out in arguably the greatest ever Challenge Cup final in 1984–85 by Wigan at Wembley Stadium with a score of 28 to 24 in Wigan's favour. A number of subsequent coaches, such as Brian Smith (1988–90) failed to deliver consistent success. Hull lost the Premiership final in 1989 to Widnes, but two years later returned to beat them at Old Trafford under coach Noel Cleal.

Royce Simmons moved to England to coach Hull for two seasons from 1992 to 1994.[3][4] In June 1993, financial trouble forced Hull to put seven players on the transfer list and Royce Simmons ran five marathons to raise money to pay for players from Australia.

Summer era

In 1996, the first tier of British rugby league clubs played the inaugural Super League season and changed from a winter to a summer season.[5] As the sport in Britain entered a new era, controversy was sparked in the city of Hull when it was suggested that Hull should merge with Hull Kingston Rovers to form 'Humberside'. Hull FC's shareholders gave the idea general approval but it was ultimately resisted.[6] The club like many other rugby league clubs re-branded and became known as the Hull Sharks. It is unclear who came up with the 'Sharks' as a nickname but for a nautical city it was a fairly obvious choice. Hull FC finished below the cut-off point of 10th in the existing top flight and so were excluded from the new Super League.

Phil Sigsworth joined the club in 1996 and coached them to the First Division championship title and promotion to Super League in 1997. However the club struggled to gain a foot hold in the competition under new manager Peter Walsh. The renaming was unpopular with the supporters and the club spiralled in to financial difficulties and went out of business. Hull Sharks closed and was taken over by the recently formed expansion team Gateshead Thunder at the end of 1999 (with the backing of the Super League).[7] The Association of Premiership Clubs blocked proposals for the newly merged company to enter a Hull-based team in the Northern Ford Premiership[8] and so Hull FC closed and Gateshead Thunder took over the traditional Hull FC identity in Super League and moved its home games to The Boulevard. Most of the Gateshead playing squad moved to Hull FC along with their Board and ex-St Helens coach Shaun McRae who remained at the helm until 2004.

After 107 years at the Boulevard, Hull FC moved in January 2003 to a £44 million state-of-the-art council-owned Kingston Communications Stadium, more commonly known as the KC Stadium and the rejuvenation of the club continued. Although they are joint tenants at the stadium alongside city's football club: the two teams sharing use of the stadium, Hull FC have been forced to play a cup match away at Doncaster to avoid two matches clashing. Shaun McRae left the club to return to Australia at the end of the 2004 season; he was replaced by former England coach John Kear, who had previously been McRae's deputy.

In his first season at the club, Kear led Hull FC to the Rugby League Challenge Cup final for the first time since 1985. Hull FC defeated Leeds 25–24 in a thrilling final at Cardiff's Millennium Stadium to lift the trophy. Paul Cooke's 77th minute try, which was converted by Danny Brough gave Hull FC a 1 point lead, which they held onto after Hull FC captain Richard Swain charged down a drop-goal attempt from Leeds skipper Kevin Sinfield in the dying seconds of the match.

John Kear left Hull FC on 3 April 2006 after a disappointing start to the season, which saw Hull lose four out of their first seven league games and also their defence of the Challenge Cup being ended at the first hurdle against the Bradford Bulls in a 23–12 defeat, to be replaced by Peter Sharp who was recruited from Parramatta Eels where he was assistant coach. Between 14 April – 15 July 2006 Hull won 13 matches in succession, including a 27–26 defeat of the league leaders St Helens on 8 June 2006. The last time they beat St Helens on their ground was 18 years ago. This run ended in defeat at Harlequins RL on 23 July 2006. Hull FC managed to finish in second place, their highest league position in the Super League era. They lost to the league leaders St Helens in the first Grand Final playoff game, but succeeded in reaching the final by defeating the reigning champions Bradford. Over 20,000 Hull FC fans travelled to Old Trafford, but again they lost out to the Saints, this time by 26–4. The overall attendance broke the Grand Final record, mainly due to the stadium's recent expansion.

For the 2007 season, Hull FC signed five players: Matt Sing (a prolific National Rugby League try-scorer and Australian representative), Hutch Maiava, Willie Manu, Danny Tickle and Wayne Godwin. Also, the Hull Football Club v Hull Kingston Rovers derbies are back for the 2007 season due to Rovers' promotion from National League 1. The first of four of these derby matches was played on Easter Monday, 9 April 2007, at the KC Stadium. The game was played in front of a sell-out attendance of 23,002 and ended with a result for the Black and Whites who had been struggling early in the season. The final score was 22–14 with Sid Domic crossing the line for the Airlie Birds in the final seconds.


On 23 April Paul Cooke, stand-off, controversially resigned from Hull Football Club to join Hull Kingston Rovers. Cooke claimed he was out of contract as he had not signed the contract that the club had offered him. Following his departure, club chief executive David Plummer resigned. His replacement James Rule has come in for much criticism.

Hull FC have endured a poor 2008 season and on 19 May 2008 the club dismissed coach Peter Sharp. A week later they appointed his assistant Richard Agar as his replacement. John Sharp has since been named as an addition to the Hull FC coaching staff. Hull finished a poor 11th in the League in 2008, falling far short of the fans expectations, although a Challenge cup final appearance and a successful franchise application ensured the season was not a complete failure. The club announced that Australian test prop Michael Crocker will sign for the club on a three-year contract from the start of the 2008–09 season. Fullback Chris Thorman has signed a one-year deal for 2009, after leaving Huddersfield. Matty Dale, Matt Sing and James Webster were released at the end of the season. Former HKR favourite – Webster having only played one game.

In March 2009 Michael Crocker was denied a visa to come to England to play for Hull FC. Hull FC announced four big name signings for the 2010 SL season: Craig Fitzgibbon, Mark O'Meley, Sean Long, and Jordan Tansey (although Tansey arrived at the club towards the end of the 2009 season, having been released early from his contract at Sydney Roosters). Several long serving players left the club at the end of the forgettable 2009 season, including Paul King, Graeme Horne, and Gareth Raynor.

Super League XV started well with five wins from the first seven games, the two losses coming away against Crusaders and Wigan Warriors. FC beat Hull KR 18–14 in the first derby of the year at Craven Park, but then followed a period of one win from five games, in which the team were convincingly knocked out of the Challenge Cup by Leeds. Hull FC finished the regular season in 6th place, however a convincing 21–4 home defeat to rivals Hull Kingston Rovers brought an early end to their playoff campaign.

On 22 July 2011 it was confirmed that Hull City's Head of Football Operations, Adam Pearson had purchased the entire shareholding of the club together with his close friend Mikey Drake and they had taken over full control from Kath Hetherington. In a statement on the club's website, it was also confirmed that James Rule would continue as chief executive.[9]

Richard Agar left the club at the end of the 2011 season and was replaced by Australian Peter Gentle. The 2012 season was a largely transitional one, with high player turnover and many injuries hampering the side's progress mid-season, however the club finished a respectable 6th in the regular season. They went on to convincingly beat Huddersfield in the first round of play-off games but fell to defeat away at Warrington in the preliminary semi-finals.

On 03/08/2013 their official Twitter page announced they had 15,000 followers

For the 2013 season, Hull again finished 6th in the regular season and beat Catalans at home in the first round of the play-offs but were comprehensively beaten 76-18 by Huddersfield in the second round. Hull also reached the Challenge cup final for the first time in 5 years but were beaten 16–0 by Wigan. On September 24th 2013 Hull FC announced the departure of Peter Gentle with two years still remaining on his contract. It is thought the record loss to Huddersfield in the play-offs along with the poor performance at Wembley were the main factors behind his demise. The next day Hull announced that 34 year old assistant Lee Radford will become Head Coach from 2014 and Andy Last would step up to become Lee's assistant. Also former player Motu Tony becomes the new director of football, replacing outgoing director Shaun McRae.

Super League results

Season summaries

Competition Played Won Drawn Lost Position
Super League III 23 8 0 15 9th
Super League IV 30 5 0 25 13th
Super League V 28 12 1 15 7th
Super League VI 28 20 2 6 3rd
Super League VII 28 16 0 12 5th
Super League VIII 28 13 3 12 7th
Super League IX 28 19 2 12 3rd
Super League X 28 15 2 11 5th
Super League XI 28 20 0 8 2nd
Super League XII 27 14 2 11 5th
Super League XIII 27 8 1 18 11th
Super League XIV 27 10 0 17 12th
Super League XV 27 16 0 11 6th
Super League XVI 27 13 1 13 8th
Super League XVII 27 15 2 10 6th
Super League XVIII 27 13 2 12 6th

2014 squad

* As of 2 October 2013


2013 Hull F.C squad
First team squad Coaching staff
  • 27 Jack Briscoe - FB
  • 28 James Cunningham - HK
  • 29 Jamie Shaul - FB
  • 30 Dean Hadley
  • 31 Alex Starling
  • 32 Ryan Wilson
  • 33 Aaron Heremaia - HK
  • 34 Jacob Miller - HB

Head coach

Assistant coach

  • Andy Last

Legend:
  • (c) Captain
  • (vc) Vice captain

Updated: 27 November 2012
Source(s): 2013 Squad Numbers


2014 transfers

Ins

Nat Name Moved From Length Date
Australia Mickey Paea Hull Kingston Rovers 2 Years June 2013
England Jordan Thompson Castleford Tigers 1 Year September 2013
Samoa Iafeta Paleaaesina Limoux Grizzlies 2 Years September 2013
England Tom Biggs Bath RFC 2 Years October 2013

Outs

Nat Name Moved To Length Date
England Danny Nicklas York City Knights 1 ½ Years May 2013
England Danny Tickle Widnes Vikings 3 Years June 2013
Australia Ben Galea Retire N/A July 2013
Australia Mark O'Meley Retire N/A September 2013
Australia Brett Seymour Castleford Tigers 1 Year September 2013
England Andy Lynch Castleford Tigers 2 Years September 2013
England Tom Briscoe Leeds Rhinos 5 Years October 2013
England Paul Johnson Widnes Vikings 1 Year October 2013
Australia Daniel Holdsworth TBC TBC TBC

Captains

Pre-Super League

1980–81: Steve Norton

1981–85: David Topliss

1985–87: Lee Crooks

1987–90: Dane O'Hara

1990–92: Greg MacKey

1992–94: Russ Walker

1994–96: Steve McNamara

1996: Gary Divorty

1997: Andy Fisher

Super League

Name Started Ended Notes
England Alan Hunte 1998 1998 Relinquished captaincy
Australia Gary Lester 1998 1998
England Karl Harrison 1999 1999 Retired
Australia Tony Grimaldi 2000 2001 Moved to Canterbury Bulldogs
Australia Jason Smith 2002 2004 Moved to Canberra Raiders
New Zealand Richard Swain 2005 2006 Relinquished captaincy
England Lee Radford 2007 2009 Relinquished captaincy
England Sean Long 2010 2011 Relinquished captaincy
Australia Craig Fitzgibbon 2011 2012 Retired to be assistant coach at Sydney Roosters
England Andy Lynch 2012 2012 Relinquished captaincy
England Gareth Ellis 2013 Present N/A

Players earning international caps while at Hull


  • William "Billy" Batten won caps for England while at Hunslet 1908 Wales (2 matches), 1908–09 Australia (3 matches), Wales, 1910 Wales, 1911–12 Australia (2 matches), 1912 Wales, 1913 Wales, while at Hull 1921 Wales, Other Nationalities, 1922 Wales, 1923 Wales, and won caps for Great Britain while at Hunslet 1908 New Zealand, 1908 Australia (3 matches), 1910 Australia (2 matches), New Zealand, 1911 Australia (2 matches), while at Hull 1921 Australia
  • Charles "Charlie" Booth won caps for England while at Hull 1938 Wales (2 matches), 1939 Wales
  • Albert Bowers won caps for England while at Hull 1947 Wales (2 matches)
  • Harold Bowman won caps for England while at Hull 1927 Wales, 1928 Wales (2 matches), 1929 Other Nationalities, and won caps for Great Britain while at Hull 1924 New Zealand (2 matches), 1926–27 New Zealand (2 matches), 1928 Australia (2 matches), New Zealand, 1929 Australia
  • Frank Boylen won caps for England while at Hull 1909 Australia, Wales, 1910 Wales, and won caps for Great Britain while at Hull 1909 Australia
  • Shaun Briscoe won caps for England while at Hull in 2004 against Russia, France, and Ireland (sub), and while at Hull Kingston Rovers in 2008 against Wales, and in 2010 against France
  • Tom Briscoe won caps for England while at Hull 2009 Wales, France 4 Nations
  • Stan Brogden won caps for England while at Bradford Northern 1929 Other Nationalities, while at Huddersfield 1932 Wales (2 matches), 1933 Other Nationalities, Australia, while at Leeds 1935 France, Wales, 1936 Wales (2 matches), France, 1938 Wales, while at Hull 1938 Wales, 1939 France, 1941 Wales, 1943 Wales, and won caps for Great Britain while at Huddersfield 1929–30 Australia, 1932 Australia (3 matches), New Zealand (3 matches), 1933 Australia (2 matches), while at Leeds 1936 Australia (3 matches), New Zealand (2 matches), 1937 Australia (2 matches)
  • Dean Busby won caps for England while at Hull 1992 Wales (sub)
  • Garreth Carvell won caps for Wales while at Leeds 2000(…2007?) 1(3?)-caps + 2-caps (sub), and won caps for Great Britain while at Hull in 2006 against New Zealand (2 matches)
  • Edward "Eddie" Caswell won caps for Wales while at Hull 1922…1927 3-caps
  • Ellis Clarkson won caps for England while at Hull 1910 Wales, 1911 Wales, 1912 Wales
  • Paul Cooke won caps for England while at Hull 2006 Tonga (2 matches), Samoa
  • Robin "Bob" Coverdale won caps for Great Britain while at Hull 1954 Australia, France, New Zealand, France (World Cup 1954 4-caps)
  • Michael "Mick" Crane won a cap for Great Britain while at Hull in 1982 against Australia at Headingley
  • Lee Crooks won caps for England while at Castleford 1992 Wales, and won caps for Great Britain while at Hull 1982 Australia (2 matches), 1984 France (sub), Australia (2 matches), 1985 New Zealand, New Zealand (sub), 1986 France (2 matches), Australia (3 matches), 1987 France, while at Leeds 1989 France, while at Castleford 1992 France (2 matches), Papua New Guinea, Australia, 1994 France


  • Andy Dannatt won caps for Great Britain while at Hull in 1985 against France (2 matches), and in 1991 against France
  • Thomas "Tom" Danter won caps for Wales while at Hull 1949…1951 5-caps
  • Gary Divorty won caps for Great Britain while at Hull in 1985 against France (2 matches)
  • Mike Dixon won caps for Scotland while at Hull, and Hull Kingston Rovers 1997…2001 1-cap + 2-caps (sub)
  • Ewan Dowes won caps for England while at Hull 2004 Russia, France, Ireland, 2006 France, Tonga, Tonga (sub), Samoa (sub)
  • Jim Drake won caps for Great Britain while at Hull 1960 France
  • Bill Drake won caps for England while at Hull 1962 France, and won caps for Great Britain while at Hull 1962 France
  • Paul Eastwood
  • Harold Ellerington won caps for England while at Hull 1938 France, 1939 France
  • Hagan Evans won caps for Wales while at Bradford Northern, and Hull 1947…1949 2-caps
  • Steve Evans won caps for England while at Featherstone 1979 France, 1980 Wales, France, and won caps for Great Britain while at Featherstone 1979 Australia, Australia (sub), New Zealand (3 matches), 1980 New Zealand, New Zealand (sub), while at Hull 1982 Australia (2 matches)
  • Vincent "Vince" Farrar won caps for England while at Featherstone 1977 France, and won caps for Great Britain while at Hull 1978 Australia
  • Alfred Francis won caps for Wales while at Hull 1913…1914 2-caps
  • Richard Gay won caps for England while at Hull 1995 Wales, France
  • Richard "Dick" Gemmell won caps for Great Britain while at Leeds in 1964 against France, while at Hull F.C. in 1968 against France, and in 1969 against France
  • Emlyn Gwynne won a cap for Wales while at Hull in 1928, and won caps for Great Britain while at Hull in 1928 against Australia, and New Zealand, and in 1929 against Australia
  • Thomas "Tommy" Harris won caps for Wales while at Hull 1952…1959 8-caps, and won caps for Great Britain while at Hull 1949–62 (?-caps) (World Cup 1957 2-caps, 1960 1-cap)
  • Gilbert "Gillie" Harrison, won caps for England (RU) while at Hull F.C. in 1877 against Ireland, and Scotland, in 1879 in Scotland, and Ireland, in 1880 against Scotland, and in 1885 against Wales, and Ireland
  • Karl Harrison won caps for England while at Halifax 1995 Wales, Australia (2 matches), South Africa, Wales, 1996 France, and won caps for Great Britain while at Hull 1990 Australia (3 matches), while at Halifax 1991 Papua New Guinea, 1992 Australia (sub) (2 matches), New Zealand, New Zealand (sub), 1993 France, New Zealand (2 matches), 1994 Australia (3 matches)
  • Mick Harrison won caps for England while at Leeds 1978 France, Wales, and won caps for Great Britain while at Hull 1967 France (2 matches), 1971 New Zealand (2 matches), 1972 France (2 matches), 1973 Australia
  • Ernest "Ernie" Herbert won caps for England while at Hull 1936 France, 1938 France
  • William "Bill" Holder won caps for England while at Hull 1908 Wales, and won caps for Great Britain while at Hull 1908 New Zealand
  • Graeme Horne won caps for England while at Hull 2006 Samoa (sub), Tonga (sub)
  • Richard Horne won caps for Scotland while at Hull 2000 3-caps, won caps for Great Britain while at Hull 2003…2006 12-caps
  • William Hutchinson, won caps for England (RU) while at Hull F.C. in 1875 against Ireland (2 matches)


  • Lee Jackson won caps for England while at Hull 1992 Wales, while at Sheffield 1995 France, Australia (2 matches), Fiji, Wales, while at Leeds 1999 France (sub) (2 matches), and won caps for Great Britain while at Hull 1990 Papua New Guinea (2 matches), New Zealand, Australia (3 matches), 1991 France (2 matches), 1992 France, New Zealand (2 matches), while at Sheffield 1993 New Zealand (2 matches), 1994 France, Australia (3 matches)
  • Michael "Mick" Jenkins won caps for Wales while at Hull 2000(…2001?) 5(4?)(1?)-caps 3(2?)(1?)-tries 12(8?)(4?)-points
  • Thomas "Tommy" W. Johnson won caps for England while at Hull 1941 Wales
  • Mark Jones won caps for Wales (RU) while at Neath in 1987 against Scotland, in 1988 against New Zealand (sub), in 1989 against Scotland, Ireland, France, England, and New Zealand, in 1990 against France, England, Scotland, Ireland, and Namibia (2 matches), and while at Pontypool in 1998 against Zimbabwe,[1] won caps for Wales (RL) while at Hull in 1991 against Papua New Guinea, in 1992 against France, England, and France, in 1993 against New Zealand, in 1994 against France, and while at Warrington in the 1995 Rugby League World Cup against France (sub), and England (sub), in 1996 against France, and England, and won a cap for Great Britain (RL) while at Hull in 1992 against France (sub)
  • Arthur Keegan won caps for England while at Hull 1969 Wales, France, 1970, and won caps for Great Britain while at Hull 1966 Australia (2 matches), 1967 France (2 matches), Australia (3 matches), 1968 France, 1969 France
  • Paul King won caps for England while at Hull 2001 Wales (sub), and won caps for Great Britain while at Hull 2001 France
  • Harry Markham won caps for England while at Hull 1953 France
  • Gus Merry won caps for Wales while at Hull 1913 England
  • Steve McNamara won caps for England while at Hull 1995 Wales (sub), France, while at Bradford Bulls 1996 France, 1999 France (2 matches), and won caps for Great Britain while at Hull 1992 France (sub), 1993 France (sub), while at Bradford Bulls 1997 ASL (2 matches) (sub)
  • Paul McNicholas won caps for Ireland while at Hull, and Oldham Roughyeds 2005…2006 3-caps
  • Gus Merry won a cap for Wales while at Hull 1913 1-cap
  • Dave Moffat won a cap for Ireland while at Hull 1996 1-cap
  • Edgar Morgan won caps for Wales while at Hull 1921…1926 5-caps 2-tries 6-points, and won caps for Great Britain while at Hull in 1921 against Australia (2 matches)
  • Steve 'Knocker' Norton won caps for England while at Castleford 1975 Wales (2 matches), New Zealand (2 matches), Australia (2 matches), France, Papua New Guinea, 1977 France, while at Hull 1978 Wales, 1981 Wales (2 matches), and won caps for Great Britain while at Castleford 1974 Australia (sub), New Zealand (2 matches), while at Hull 1978 Australia (3 matches), 1979 Australia (2 matches), 1980 New Zealand, 1981 France (2 matches), 1982 Australia
  • George Oliver won caps for Wales (RU) while at Pontypool RFC in 1920 against England, Scotland, France, and Ireland, and won caps for Wales (RL) while at Hull, and Pontypridd 1921…1927 4-caps
  • Joseph "Joe" Oliver won caps for England while at Batley 1928 Wales, Hull 1933 Australia, 1936 Wales, France, and won caps for Great Britain while at Batley 1928 Australia (3 matches), New Zealand
  • Paul Prendiville won caps for Wales while at Hull in 1979 against England, in 1980 against England, in 1981 against France, and England, in 1982 against Australia, and while at Leeds in 1984 against England, and won a cap for Great Britain while at Hull in 1982 against France
  • Steve Prescott won caps for Ireland while at Hull F.C., and Wakefield Trinity Wildcats 1998…2000 8-caps
  • Wayne Proctor won a cap for Great Britain while at Hull in 1984 against Papua New Guinea
  • Lee Radford won caps for England while at Bradford Bulls 2001 Wales (sub), 2005 France, New Zealand, while at Hull 2006 France, Tonga (2 matches), Samoa
  • Gareth Raynor won caps for England while at Hull 2004 Russia, France, and won caps for Great Britain while at Hull 2005 Australia, 2006 Australia (2 matches), New Zealand, 2007 New Zealand (2 matches)
  • Paul Rose won caps for England while at Hull K.R. 1977 France, 1978 Wales, and won caps for Great Britain while at Hull K.R. 1974 Australia (sub), 1978 Australia, Australia (sub) (2 matches), while at Hull 1982 Australia


  • Garry Schofield won caps for England while at Hull 1984 Wales, while at Leeds 1992 Wales, 1995 Wales, and won caps for Great Britain while at Hull 1984 France, Australia (3 matches), New Zealand, 1985 New Zealand (3 matches), 1986 France (2 matches), Australia (3 matches), 1987 France (2 matches), while at Leeds 1988 France (2 matches), Papua New Guinea, Australia, 1990 France (2 matches), Papua New Guinea (2 matches), New Zealand (3 matches), Australia (3 matches), 1991 France (2 matches), Papua New Guinea: 1992 Papua New Guinea, Australia (3 matches), New Zealand (2 matches), Australia, 1993 France, New Zealand (3 matches), 1994 France, Australia (sub) (2 matches)
  • Michael "Mick" Scott won caps for England while at Hull 1951 Wales, 1952 Other Nationalities, 1953 Wales
  • Trevor Skerrett (1979 Challenge Cup Runner-up) won caps for Wales while at Wakefield Trinity in 1978 against Australia, in 1979 against France, and England, in 1980 against France, and while at Hull F.C. in 1981 against France, and England, in 1984 against England, and won caps for Great Britain while at Wakefield Trinity in 1979 against Australia (2 matches), and New Zealand (2 matches), and while at Hull F.C. in 1980 against New Zealand (2 matches), in 1981 against France (2 matches), and in 1982 against Australia (2 matches)
  • Christopher "Chris" Smith won caps for Wales while at St. Helens, and Hull 1999…2002 3-caps + 2-caps (sub) 1-try 4-points
  • Gareth Stephens won caps for Wales while at Hull 1996…1998 (3?)2-caps + 2-caps (sub)
  • Ian Stevens won caps for Wales while at Hull 1992 2-caps + 1-cap (sub)
  • William "Billy" Stone won caps for England while at Hull 1921 Wales, Other Nationalities, Australia, 1922 Wales, 1923 Wales (2 matches), and won caps for Great Britain while at Hull 1920 Australia (3 matches), New Zealand (3 matches), 1921–22 Australia (2 matches)
  • Clive Sullivan won caps for Wales while at Hull 1969…1974, and while at Hull KR 1974…1979 15-caps (World Cup 1975 4-caps, 1-try), and won caps for Great Britain while at Hull 1967–73 ?-caps (World Cup 1968 3-caps 4-tries, 1972 Captain 4-caps 4-tries)
  • Bob Taylor won caps for England while at Hull 1921 Australia, 1922 Wales, 1923 Wales, 1925 Wales (2 matches), 1926 Wales, Other Nationalities, and won caps for Great Britain while at Hull 1921–22 Australia, 1926–27 New Zealand
  • Harry Taylor won caps for England while at Hull 1908 Wales, New Zealand, and won caps for Great Britain while at Hull 1908 New Zealand (3 matches)
  • Lawrence "Laurie" Thacker won caps for England while at Hull 1938 France, Wales, 1939 France, 1941 Wales
  • Keith Tindall won caps for England while at Hull 1979 France
  • Danny Tickle won caps for England while at Hull 2009 Wales (sub)
  • David Topliss won caps for England while at Wakefield 1975 France, Australia (sub), and won caps for Great Britain while at Wakefield 1973 Australia (2 matches), 1979 Australia, while at Hull 1982 Australia (World Cup 1972 Squad 0-caps)
  • Tevita Vaikona won caps for Tonga while at Hull 1995 ?-caps
  • Harry Wallace won caps for England while at Hull 1908 New Zealand
  • Graham Walters won caps for Wales while at Hull, and Bridgend Blue Dragons 1980…1984 2(3?)-caps + 1-cap (sub)
  • John "Johnny" Whiteley won caps for England while at Hull 1953 France, and won caps for Great Britain while at Hull 1957 Australia, 1958 Australia (3 matches), New Zealand, 1959 France (2 matches), Australia (2 matches), 1960 France, New Zealand, France, 1961 New Zealand (2 matches), 1962 France (World Cup 1954 Squad 0-caps, 1957 1-cap, 1960 2-caps)
  • Richard Whiting won caps for England while at Hull 2004 Russia, Ireland (sub), 2006 France
  • Paul Woods won caps for Wales while at Widnes, Rochdale Hornets, and Hull 1977…1981 10-caps 13-goals 26-points
  • Kirk Yeaman won caps for England while at Hull 2004 Russia, France, Ireland, and won caps for Great Britain while at Hull 2006 Australia, New Zealand, 2007 New Zealand (sub)
  • Crawford Matthews won caps for Scotland while at Hull 2011 Ireland, France[10][11]

Other notable players

These players have either; won Challenge Cup, Rugby Football League Championship, Yorkshire Cup, Yorkshire League, played during Super League, have received a Testimonial match, were international representatives before, or after, their time at Hull, or are notable outside of rugby league.





Honours

Records

Player records

  • Most tries in a match: 7 by Clive Sullivan vs Doncaster, 15 April 1968
  • Most goals in a match: 14 by Jim Kennedy vs Rochdale Hornets- 7 April 1921, Geoffrey "Geoff" 'Sammy' Lloyd v Oldham – 10 September 1978, Matt Crowther v Sheffield Eagles – 2 March 2003
  • Most points in a match: 36 by Jim Kennedy vs Keighley, 29 January 1921
  • Most tries in a season: 52 by John "Jack" Harrison VC, MC, 1914–15
  • Most goals in a season: 170 by Geoffrey "Geoff" 'Sammy' Lloyd, 1978–79
  • Most points in a season: 369 by Geoffrey "Geoff" 'Sammy' Lloyd, 1978–79
  • Consecutive Tries: 11 by John "Jack" Harrison VC, MC, 1914–15 & Richard Horne, 2006

Career records

  • Most goals: 687 – Joe Oliver 1928–37 & 1943–45
  • Most tries: 250 – Clive Sullivan 1961–74 & 1981–85
  • Most points: 1,842 – Joe Oliver 1928–37 & 1943–45
  • Most appearances: 501 – Edward Rogers 1906–25

Team records

  • Highest score: 88–0 vs Sheffield Eagles, 2 March 2003
  • Highest against: 71–0 vs Bradford Bulls, play-offs 2005
  • Highest attendance: 28,798 vs Leeds, 7 March 1936
  • Fastest ever try in both codes of rugby: 9 seconds by Wayback Machine still stands today
  • Only team to have won every single league game in a season: 1979 Division Two
  • Most consecutive Super League victories: 13 games, (14 April 2006 – 15 July 2006, beating Huddersfield, Wakefield, Catalans, Wigan, Bradford, Leeds, Huddersfield, St Helens, Harlequins, Castleford, Catalans, Salford & Warrington).

Also made their first super league grand final but lost to St Helens in 2006

References

External links

  • Official site
  • Hull FC Shirt history
  • Hull FC History

This article was sourced from Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. World Heritage Encyclopedia content is assembled from numerous content providers, Open Access Publishing, and in compliance with The Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR), Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., Public Library of Science, The Encyclopedia of Life, Open Book Publishers (OBP), PubMed, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and USA.gov, which sources content from all federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial government publication portals (.gov, .mil, .edu). Funding for USA.gov and content contributors is made possible from the U.S. Congress, E-Government Act of 2002.
 
Crowd sourced content that is contributed to World Heritage Encyclopedia is peer reviewed and edited by our editorial staff to ensure quality scholarly research articles.
 
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. World Heritage Encyclopedia™ is a registered trademark of the World Public Library Association, a non-profit organization.
 


Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from Project Gutenberg are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.