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Hutchins, Texas

Hutchins, Texas
City
Location of Hutchins in Dallas County, Texas
Location of Hutchins in Dallas County, Texas
Coordinates:
Country United States
State Texas
County Dallas City Type: Rural
Government
 • Mayor Mario Vasquez
Area
 • Total 9.3 sq mi (24.1 km2)
 • Land 9.1 sq mi (23.6 km2)
 • Water 0.2 sq mi (0.6 km2)  2.35%
Elevation 466 ft (142 m)
Population (2010)
 • Total 5,338
 • Density 570/sq mi (220/km2)
Time zone CST (UTC-6)
 • Summer (DST) CDT (UTC-5)
ZIP code 75141
Area code(s) 972
FIPS code 48-35612[1]
GNIS feature ID 1338331[2]
Website http://www.cityofhutchins.org/

Hutchins is a city in Dallas County, Texas, United States. The population was 5,338 at the 2010 census.[3]

Union Pacific's Dallas Intermodal Terminal is located partly in the city of Hutchins and partly in the city of Wilmer [2]. The shipping facility was built by AUI Contractors LP, Prime Rail Interests Inc. and Halff Associates, Inc., a 70 million U.S. dollar project.

Contents

  • Geography 1
  • History 2
  • Demographics 3
  • Government and infrastructure 4
  • Education 5
    • Primary and secondary schools 5.1
      • School histories 5.1.1
    • Public libraries 5.2
  • References 6
  • External links 7

Geography

Hutchins is located at (32.643784, -96.707538),[4] approximately 9 miles (14 km) south of downtown Dallas. It is bordered by Dallas on the north and northwest, Lancaster on the southwest, Wilmer to the south, and the Trinity River to the east.[5] Interstate Highways 20 and 45 pass through the city.

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 9.3 square miles (24.1 km2), of which 9.1 square miles (23.6 km2) is land and 0.23 square miles (0.6 km2), or 2.35%, is water.[6]

History

The area was first inhabited by whites around 1860 as a trading place for immigrants who settled along the west bank of the Trinity River and new arrivals who crossed the Trinity at Dowd's Ferry from the east.[7]

The town received its name from railroad developer William J. Hutchins, who was then President and General Manager of the Houston and Texas Central Railroad (H&TC).[8] The railway was completed through Hutchins in 1872. That same year a post office opened in the community.[7] The population of Hutchins grew to approximately 250 residents in 1884 and topped 300 by 1890. That figure declined slightly to 204 in 1904, but had risen to 500 in 1926.[7]

Hutchins was officially incorporated in 1945.[5][7] In the first census conducted after incorporation in 1950, the population stood at 743. Despite the rapid growth of Dallas County and most of its suburban communities during the latter half of the 20th century, Hutchins has grown at a much slower pace and today is one of the smallest municipalities in the county. As of 2000, the city of Hutchins had 133 businesses and a population of 2,805. Many of the businesses in the city are industrial or manufacturing related. A number of its residents are employed in the city of Dallas.[7]

Demographics

As of the census[1] of 2000, there were 2,805 people, 927 households, and 668 families residing in the city. The population density was 330.5 people per square mile (127.6/km²). There were 1,055 housing units at an average density of 124.3/sq mi (48.0/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 43.07% White, 37.33% African American, 0.89% Native American, 0.25% Asian, 15.44% from other races, and 3.03% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 23.99% of the population.

There were 927 households out of which 35.6% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 47.6% were married couples living together, 18.7% had a female householder with no husband present, and 27.9% were non-families. 23.7% of all households were made up of individuals and 7.4% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.91 and the average family size was 3.43.

In the city the population was spread out with 28.8% under the age of 18, 10.4% from 18 to 24, 30.7% from 25 to 44, 21.7% from 45 to 64, and 8.3% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 31 years. For every 100 females there were 100.2 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 96.1 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $37,153, and the median income for a family was $39,083. Males had a median income of $28,162 versus $24,261 for females. The per capita income for the city was $14,403. About 12.7% of families and 14.8% of the population were below the poverty line, including 18.6% of those under age 18 and 9.9% of those age 65 or over.

Government and infrastructure

The Texas Department of Criminal Justice operates the Hutchins Unit, a state jail for men in Hutchins.[11]

Education

Primary and secondary schools

Hutchins is served by the Dallas Independent School District. The area is within the Board of Trustees District 5;[12][13]

As of fall 2011, the area is zoned to Wilmer-Hutchins Elementary School,[14] Kennedy-Curry Middle School,[15] and Wilmer-Hutchins High School.[16]

School histories

Most of Hutchins was served by the Wilmer-Hutchins Independent School District.

Until the end of the school district, C.S. Winn Elementary School was located in Hutchins.[17][18] The Hutchins Academic Elementary School was also located in Hutchins.[17] In 2004 the WHISD board voted to close Hutchins Academic, which had 82 students at the time of closure.[19][20] the former students moved to C.S. Winn and Wilmer Elementary School in Wilmer in January 2005.[19] In addition the Hutchins 5th Grade Center opened in 2000.[21] In addition, Kennedy-Curry Middle School and Wilmer-Hutchins High School in Dallas, then under WHISD control, served Wilmer.

The Dallas Independent School District took over all of WHISD for the 2005-2006 school year. WHISD closed shortly afterwards, with official termination in Spring 2006. After the closure of WHISD property values in the district increased.[22]

For the 2005-2006 school year until the 2010-2011 school year, the W-H ISD portion of Hutchins was served by several schools located in Dallas. In 2005-2006 and 2006-2007[23] they included J.P. Starks,[24] Martin Weiss,[25] and Whitney Young.[26] From 2007-2008 to 2010-2011 the elementary schools serving Hutchins only included Martin Weiss and Whitney Young Elementary Schools (in two separate attendance zones).[27][28][29][30]

From 2005-2006[31] until 2010-2011 secondary schools included Hulcy (Weiss zone) and Zumwalt Middle Schools (Starks and Young zones),[32][33][34][35] and Carter High School (Weiss zone) and A. Maceo Smith High School (Starks and Young zones).[36][37][38][39]

The Dallas ISD considered opening a new Wilmer-Hutchins Elementary School building, restoring the Wilmer-Hutchins High School building, and demolishing the Kennedy-Curry Middle School building as part of its 2008 bond campaign.[40] The Wilmer Hutchins Elementary School will open in an area of the City of Dallas in 2011.[41] In November 2010 DISD announced that three schools (Wilmer Hutchins ES, Kennedy-Curry Middle School, and Wilmer-Hutchins HS) would open/re-open in the Wilmer-Hutchins area in 2011.[42]

Public libraries

The Atwell Public Library serves Hutchins.[43]

References

  1. ^ a b "American FactFinder".  
  2. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names".  
  3. ^ "Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data (DP-1): Hutchins city, Texas". U.S. Census Bureau, American Factfinder. Retrieved January 12, 2012. 
  4. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990".  
  5. ^ a b "About Hutchins, Texas". City of Hutchins. Retrieved 2009-03-23. 
  6. ^ "Geographic Identifiers: 2010 Demographic Profile Data (G001): Hutchins city, Texas". U.S. Census Bureau, American Factfinder. Retrieved January 12, 2012. 
  7. ^ a b c d e "Hutchins, Texas".  
  8. ^ "William J. Hutchins".  
  9. ^ "Annual Estimates of the Resident Population for Incorporated Places: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2014". Retrieved June 4, 2015. 
  10. ^ "Census of Population and Housing". Census.gov. Retrieved June 4, 2015. 
  11. ^ "Hutchins Unit." Texas Department of Criminal Justice. Retrieved on January 8, 2010.
  12. ^ "Trustee District 5 with School Locations." Dallas Independent School District. Retrieved on November 24, 2008.
  13. ^ "Hutchins city, Texas." U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved on September 3, 2011.
  14. ^ "Fall 2011 Wilmer-Hutchins Elementary Attendance Zone Grades PK-5." Dallas Independent School District. Retrieved on July 15, 2011.
  15. ^ "Fall 2011 Kennedy-Curry Middle School Attendance Zone Grades 6-8." Dallas Independent School District. Retrieved on July 15, 2011.
  16. ^ "Fall 2011 Wilmer-Hutchins High School Attendance Zone Grades 9-12." Dallas Independent School District. Retrieved on July 15, 2011.
  17. ^ a b "Campuses." Wilmer-Hutchins Independent School District. April 5, 2002. Retrieved on September 3, 2011.
  18. ^ "Our Schools." Wilmer-Hutchins Independent School District. Retrieved on September 3, 2011. "C.S. Winn Elementary 1701 S. Millers Ferry Road Hutchins, Texas 75141" and "Hutchins Academic 500 Palestine Street Hutchins, Texas 75241"
  19. ^ a b Benton, Joshua. "Wilmer-Hutchins board votes to close 3 schools; Police Department also gets ax as district tries to rein in costs." The Dallas Morning News. December 14, 2004. 1B. Retrieved on August 22, 2009.
  20. ^ Benton, Joshua. "Wilmer-Hutchins district plans to close 3 campuses to cut costs; Schools chief says arts magnet, elementary, learning center to shut." The Dallas Morning News. December 7, 2004. 1B. Retrieved on September 3, 2011.
  21. ^ "Chapter 2 EDUCATIONAL SERVICE DELIVERY Wilmer-Hutchins Independent School District." Texas State Comptroller of Public Accounts. Retrieved on September 3, 2011.
  22. ^ "W-H property values increase: Schools' negative publicity had scared development, some say.." The Dallas Morning News. July 1, 2006.
  23. ^ "Building Usage in Elementary Schools Fall 2005." Dallas Independent School District. Retrieved on September 6, 2011.
  24. ^ "Fall 2006 J. P. Starks Elementary (PK-5) Attendance Zone with Wilmer-Hutchins." Dallas Independent School District. Retrieved on September 3, 2011.
  25. ^ "Fall 2006 Martin Weiss Elementary (PK-5) Attendance Zone with Wilmer-Hutchins." Dallas Independent School District. Retrieved on September 3, 2011.
  26. ^ "Fall 2006 Whitney M. Young (PK-5) Attendance Zone with Wilmer-Hutchins." Dallas Independent School District. Retrieved on September 3, 2011.
  27. ^ "Fall 2007 Martin Weiss Elementary Attendance Zone Grades PK-5." Dallas Independent School District. Retrieved on July 15, 2011.
  28. ^ "Fall 2007 Whitney M. Young Elementary Attendance Zone Grades PK-5." Dallas Independent School District. Retrieved on July 15, 2011.
  29. ^ "Fall 2010 Martin Weiss Elementary Attendance Zone Grades PK-5." Dallas Independent School District. Retrieved on July 15, 2011.
  30. ^ "Fall 2010 Whitney M. Young Jr. Elementary Attendance Zone Grades PK-5." Dallas Independent School District. Retrieved on July 15, 2011.
  31. ^ "Building Usage in Middle Schools Fall 2005." Dallas Independent School District. Retrieved on September 6, 2011.
  32. ^ "Fall 2006 Hulcy Middle School (6-8) Attendance Zone with Wilmer-Hutchins." Dallas Independent School District. Retrieved on September 3, 2011.
  33. ^ "Fall 2006 Hulcy Middle School (6-8) Attendance Zone with Wilmer-Hutchins." Dallas Independent School District. Retrieved on September 3, 2011.
  34. ^ "Fall 2010 D. A. Hulcy Middle School Attendance Zone with Wilmer-Hutchins — Grades 6-8." Dallas Independent School District. Retrieved on July 15, 2011.
  35. ^ "Fall 2010 Sarah Zumwalt Middle School Attendance Zone with Wilmer-Hutchins — Grades 6-8." Dallas Independent School District. Retrieved on July 15, 2011.
  36. ^ "Fall 2006 David W. Carter High School (9-12) Attendance Zone with Wilmer-Hutchins." Dallas Independent School District. Retrieved on July 15, 2011.
  37. ^ "Fall 2006 A. Maceo Smith High School (9-12) Attendance Zone with Wilmer-Hutchins." Dallas Independent School District. Retrieved on July 15, 2011.
  38. ^ "Fall 2010 David W. Carter High School Attendance Zone with Wilmer-Hutchins — Grades 9-12." Dallas Independent School District. Retrieved on July 15, 2011.
  39. ^ "Fall 2010 A. Maceo Smith High School Attendance Zone with Wilmer-Hutchins — Grades 9-12." Dallas Independent School District. Retrieved on July 15, 2011.
  40. ^ "Summary of Recommendations for 2008 Bond Program." Dallas Independent School District.
  41. ^ "New Schools-2008 Bond Program." Dallas Independent School District. Retrieved on January 8, 2010.
  42. ^ Hobbs, Tawnell D. "Dallas school district to open 3 Wilmer-Hutchins campuses, close 2 others." The Dallas Morning News. November 24, 2010. Retrieved on July 15, 2011.
  43. ^ "About Hutchins, Texas." City of Hutchins. Retrieved on April 27, 2009.

External links

  • City of Hutchins official website
  • Hutchins Fire Department
  • Hutchins Police Department
  • Hutchins Economic Development Corporation
  • Hutchins Economic Development Corporation (Archive)
  • Hutchins, Texas from the Handbook of Texas Online
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