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Hypermodernism (art)

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Hypermodernism (art)

Hypermodernism refers to a cultural, artistic, literary and architectural movement distinguished from Modernism and Postmodernism chiefly by its extreme and antithetical approach. Although the term is sometimes erroneously used to describe modernists such as Le Corbusier, it has come to have some aspects of modernism filtered through the latest technological materials and approaches to design or composition. References to magic and an underlying flexible self-identity often coupled with a strong irony of statement categorize the movement. Some theorists view hypermodernism as a form of resistance to standard modernism; others see it as late romanticism in modernist trappings.

Artists

Architects

Writers

Sculptors

  • Christoph Draeger
  • Jon Dixon

Musicians

  • Paul Evans
  • William Schimmel
  • Otto Von Schirach

Web

Bibliography

  • Paul Virilio : From Modernism to Hypermodernism and Beyond; ISBN 0-7619-5901-7
  • Enrico G. Botta : A dying paradigm. The Extraordinary Hypermodernism.; [9]
  • Pete Ippel Moves Beyond the Modern; [10]
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