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Hypertensive crisis

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Hypertensive crisis

Severely elevated blood pressure (equal to or greater than a systolic 180 or diastolic of 110—sometimes termed malignant or accelerated hypertension) is referred to as a "hypertensive crisis", as blood pressure at this level confers a high risk of complications. People with blood pressures in this range may have no symptoms, but are more likely to report headaches (22% of cases)[1] and dizziness than the general population.[2] Other symptoms accompanying a hypertensive crisis may include visual deterioration due to retinopathy, breathlessness due to heart failure, or a general feeling of malaise due to kidney failure.[3] Most people with a hypertensive crisis are known to have elevated blood pressure, but additional triggers may have led to a sudden rise.[4]

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  1. ^ Papadopoulos DP, Mourouzis I, Thomopoulos C, Makris T, Papademetriou V; Mourouzis; Thomopoulos; Makris; Papademetriou (December 2010). "Hypertension crisis". Blood Press. 19 (6): 328–36.  
  2. ^ Fisher ND, Williams GH (2005). "Hypertensive vascular disease". In Kasper DL, Braunwald E, Fauci AS; et al. Harrison's Principles of Internal Medicine (16th ed.). New York, NY: McGraw-Hill. pp. 1463–81.  
  3. ^ a b O'Brien, Eoin; Beevers, D. G.; Lip, Gregory Y. H. (2007). ABC of hypertension. London: BMJ Books.  
  4. ^ a b c d e Marik PE, Varon J; Varon (June 2007). "Hypertensive crises: challenges and management". Chest 131 (6): 1949–62.  
  5. ^ Chobanian, AV; Bakris, GL; Black, HR; Cushman, WC; Green, LA; Izzo JL, Jr; Jones, DW; Materson, BJ; Oparil, S; Wright JT, Jr; Roccella, EJ; Joint National Committee on Prevention, Detection, Evaluation, and Treatment of High Blood Pressure. National Heart, Lung, and Blood, Institute; National High Blood Pressure Education Program Coordinating, Committee (Dec 2003). "Seventh report of the Joint National Committee on Prevention, Detection, Evaluation, and Treatment of High Blood Pressure". Hypertension 42 (6): 1206–52.  

References

[4] Use of oral medications to lower the BP gradually over 24 to 48h is advocated in hypertensive urgencies.[3]

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