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Illinois's 18th congressional district

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Illinois's 18th congressional district

Illinois's 18th congressional district
Illinois's 18th congressional district - since January 3, 2013.
Illinois's 18th congressional district - since January 3, 2013.
Current Representative Aaron Schock (RPeoria)
Area 10,516 mi²
Distribution 63.7% urban, 36.3% rural
Population (2011 est.) 707,238
Median income $54,571
Ethnicity 91.4% White, 3.9% Black, 2.4% Asian, 2.3% Hispanic, 0.2% Native American, 0.6% other
Cook PVI R+11[1]

The 18th Congressional District of Illinois covers central and western Illinois, including the cities of Jacksonville, Peoria, and Springfield. Republican Aaron Schock has represented the district since January 2009.

Although he represented the 7th district, Abraham Lincoln served much of the area that now lies within the 18th district.

The 18th district has been represented by a graduate of Bradley University since 1957.

2011 redistricting

The district covers parts of Pike, Schuyler, Scott and Woodford counties, as of the 2011 redistricting which followed the 2010 census. All or parts of Bloomington, Chatham, Jacksonville, Lincoln, Macomb, Morton, Normal, Peoria, Quincy and Springfield are included.[2] The representatives for these districts were elected in the 2012 primary and general elections, and the boundaries became effective on January 5, 2013.

2012 election

List of representatives

Representative Party Years District home Notes
District created March 4, 1873
Isaac Clements Republican March 4, 1873 – March 3, 1875
William Hartzell Democratic March 4, 1875 – March 3, 1879
John R. Thomas Republican March 4, 1879 – March 3, 1883 Redistricted to the 20th district
William R. Morrison Democratic March 4, 1883 – March 3, 1887 Redistricted from the 17th district
Jehu Baker Republican March 4, 1887 – March 3, 1889
William S. Forman Democratic March 4, 1889 – March 3, 1895
Frederick Remann Republican March 4, 1895 – July 14, 1895 Died
Vacant July 14, 1895 - December 2, 1895
William F. L. Hadley Republican December 2, 1895 – March 3, 1897
Thomas M. Jett Democratic March 4, 1897 – March 3, 1903
Joseph G. Cannon Republican March 4, 1903 – March 3, 1913 Redistricted from the 12th district, Speaker of the U.S. House of Representatives from 1903–1911
Frank T. O'Hair Democratic March 4, 1913 – March 3, 1915
Joseph G. Cannon Republican March 4, 1915 – March 3, 1923
William P. Holaday Republican March 4, 1923 – March 3, 1933
James A. Meeks Democratic March 4, 1933 – January 3, 1939
Jessie Sumner Republican January 3, 1939 – January 3, 1947
Edward H. Jenison Republican January 3, 1947 – January 3, 1949 Redistricted to the 23rd district
Harold H. Velde Republican January 3, 1949 – January 3, 1957
Robert H. Michel Republican January 3, 1957 – January 3, 1995 House Minority Leader from 1981–1995
Ray LaHood Republican January 3, 1995 – January 3, 2009
Aaron Schock Republican January 3, 2009 – Present Incumbent

Election results

Illinois's 18th congressional district: Results 1994–2010[3]
Year Democrat Votes Pct Republican Votes Pct
1994 G. Douglas Stephens 78,332 39% Ray LaHood 119,838 60% *
1996 Mike Curran 98,413 41% Ray LaHood 143,110 59%
1998 (no candidate) Ray LaHood 158,175 100% *
2000 Joyce Harant 85,317 33% Ray LaHood 173,706 67%
2002 (no candidate) Ray LaHood 192,567 100%
2004 Steve Waterworth 91,548 30% Ray LaHood 216,047 70%
2006 Steve Waterworth 73,052 33% Ray LaHood 150,194 67%
2008 Colleen Callahan 117,642 38% Aaron Schock 182,589 59% *
2010 Deirdre "D.K." Hirner 57,046 26% Aaron Schock 152,868 69% *
2012 Steve Waterworth 85,164 26% Aaron Schock 244,467 74%

* Write-in and minor candidate notes: In 1994, write-ins received 955 votes. In 1998, write-ins received 2 votes. In 2008, Green Party candidate Sheldon Schafer received 9,857 votes. In 2010, Schafer received 11,256 votes.

2008

Ray LaHood decided not to seek re-election in 2008 and was chosen by Barack Obama to serve as U.S. Secretary of Transportation. Illinois State Representative Aaron Schock of Peoria won the seat for the Republicans in the November 4, 2008 election. His main opponent was Democrat Colleen Callahan, of Kickapoo, a radio and television broadcaster. Green Party candidate and educator Sheldon Schafer, of Peoria, was in a distant third place on the ballot.[4]

2010

Presidential election results

Election results from presidential races
Year Office Results
2012 President Romney 61 - 37%[1]
2008 President McCain 54 - 44%[1]
2004 President Bush 58 - 42%
2000 President Bush 54 - 43%

Historical district boundaries

2003 - 2013

See also

References

  1. ^ a b c   Copyright National Journal.
  2. ^ Illinois Congressional District 18, Illinois Board of Elections
  3. ^ "Election Statistics". Office of the Clerk of the House of Representatives. Retrieved October 6, 2011. 
  4. ^ "Elections".   100% of precincts reporting. Unframed data at [1].
  • Martis, Kenneth C. (1989). The Historical Atlas of Political Parties in the United States Congress. New York: Macmillan Publishing Company. 
  • Martis, Kenneth C. (1982). The Historical Atlas of United States Congressional Districts. New York: Macmillan Publishing Company. 
  • Congressional Biographical Directory of the United States 1774–present

External links

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