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Inquiline

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Title: Inquiline  
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Subject: Wyeomyia smithii, Termitaphididae, Symbiosis, Fly, Ficus aurea
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Inquiline

Wyeomyia smithii larva is an inquiline species in the pitcher leaves of Sarracenia purpurea (magnification 40X).

In gophers and feed on debris, fungi, roots, etc. The most widely distributed types of inquiline are those found in association with the nests of social insects, especially ants and termites – a single colony may support dozens of different inquiline species. The distinctions between parasites, social parasites, and inquilines are subtle, and many species may fulfill the criteria for more than one of these, as inquilines do exhibit many of the same characteristics as parasites. However, parasites are specifically not inquilines, because by definition they have a deleterious effect on the host species, while inquilines do not.

Examples of the inquiline relation are known especially among the gall wasps (Cynipidae family). In the sub-family Synerginae this mode of life predominates. These insects differ but little in structure from the true gall-inducing wasps, but they cannot produce galls and consequently deposit their eggs within those of other species. They infest certain species of galls, such as those of the blackberry and some oak galls, in large numbers, and sometimes more than one kind occur in a single gall. Perhaps the most remarkable feature of these inquilines is their frequent close resemblance to the insect that produces the gall they infest.[1][2]

Other examples of inquiline species include Vespula austriaca (its common host being Vespula acadica [3]) and Dolichovespula adulterina (its common hosts being Dolichovespula norwegica and Dolichovespula arenaria.[4][5] Both are members of the Vespidae family of wasps.

The term inquiline has also been applied to aquatic invertebrates that spend all or part of their life cycles in

  1. ^  
  2. ^ Discover Life: Family Cynipidae: Subfamily Synerginae visited 1 January 2011
  3. ^
  4. ^
  5. ^
  6. ^
  7. ^ Cochran-Stafira, D. L. and von Ende, C. N. (1998). Integrating bacteria into food webs: studies with Sarracenia purpurea inquilines. Ecology, 79(3): 880–898.
  8. ^ Adlassnig, W., Peroutka, M., & Lendl, T. (2011). Traps of carnivorous pitcher plants as a habitat: composition of the fluid, biodiversity and mutualistic activities. Annals Of Botany, 107(2), 181–194.

References

See also

Leading to a higher diversity of inquilines. [8]

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