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International Year of the Child

 

International Year of the Child

The Year of the Child logo was used in conjunction with observances worldwide

UNESCO The United Nations declared 1979 as the International Year of the Child to celebrate the twentieth anniversary of the Declaration of the Rights of the Child and to encourage its application. The objectives of this year, as outlined in the United Nations General Assembly Resolution of 21 December 1976.UNESCO proclaimed 1979 as the International Year of the Child.[1] The proclamation was signed on January 1, 1979 by United Nations Secretary General Kurt Waldheim. A follow-up to the 1959 Declaration of the Rights of the Child, the proclamation was intended to draw attention to problems that affected children throughout the world, including malnutrition and lack of access to education. Many of these efforts resulted in the Convention on the Rights of the Child in 1989.

Numerous events took place within the UN and in member countries to mark the event, including the Music for UNICEF Concert, held at the UN General Assembly on January 9. WBZ-TV 4 in Boston, Massachusetts, along with the four other Group W stations, hosted and broadcast a celebratory festival, "Kidsfair" (usually held around Labor Day ever since) from Boston Common. Canadian animator/director Eugene Fedorenko created a film for the National Film Board of Canada, called "Every Child", which centered on a nameless baby who nobody wants because they're too busy with their own concerns. This was used to explain the importance of how every child is entitled to a home. Sound effects were created with the voices of Les Mimes Electriques.

See also

References

  1. ^ "Prizes and Celebrations: International Year of the Child", UNESCO. Retrieved 6/29/08.

External links

  • International legal Standards for Children's Rights
  • Children's Rights Alliance England (CRAE)


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