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It's a Scandal! It's a Outrage!

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Title: It's a Scandal! It's a Outrage!  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Language: English
Subject: Richard Rodgers, Oklahoma (song), Rodgers and Hammerstein, All Er Nuthin', The Farmer and the Cowman
Collection: 1943 Songs, Songs from Oklahoma!, Songs with Lyrics by Oscar Hammerstein II, Songs with Music by Richard Rodgers
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It's a Scandal! It's a Outrage!


It's a Scandal! It's a Outrage! is a song from the musical Oklahoma!. It was first performed on Broadway by Joseph Buloff.

Traveling Persian salesman Ali Hakim has just been pushed into marrying Ado Annie Carnes by her father, Andrew Carnes. He is the type of person that would flirt with forty women, but would only rather be married than shot. Now feeling trapped, he sings with the men of Oklahoma of how tricky and dirty girls are in getting husbands, using their fathers (with their guns) as backups. The song ends with the men declaring a revolution and then having their plans thwarted by their women, who come in and drag them away.

During the song, he compares women to chickens ("A rooster in a chicken coop is better off'n men, he ain't the special property of just one hen!") and tells of the dangers of being caught flirting ("If you make one mistake when the moon is bright, then they tie you to a contract so you make it every night!").

He actually only sings two lines of the song, the rest is spoken. Its name has the grammatical error ("a Outrage," instead of "an Outrage") deliberately as Hammerstein wrote his scripts phonetically.

This song from the original stage musical was not included in the 1955 film version, but is used briefly as underscoring only for Ali's appearance.


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