World Library  
Flag as Inappropriate
Email this Article

Jn53dv

Article Id: WHEBN0039267655
Reproduction Date:

Title: Jn53dv  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Language: English
Subject: BPC (time signal), HD2IOA, RBU (radio station), OLB5, Y3S
Collection:
Publisher: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Publication
Date:
 

Jn53dv

is the Maidenhead grid square of an experimental[1] shortwave time signal station in Italy.  It is located in the town of Corsanico-Bargecchia[2] near Massarosa and operated by Italcable[1]

Transmission format

The station transmits at 10 MHz[3] and 15 MHz[4] with 90 W of power.[2] Audio is modulated on the upper sideband,[5] with carrier retained.[3] Voice time announcements are made (in a male voice) every minute, with longer station identification announcements (in a female voice) each quarter hour.

The balance of each minute is filled with instrumental music, as well as SSTV images.[5]

At the end of each minute is the standard RAI time signal, as generated by INRiM (Istituto Nazionale di Ricerca Metrologica, National Institute of Metrology Research) and broadcast intermittently on Italian radio and television stations.[6] The minute is announced with six 1000 Hz pips, 0.1 seconds each, at the beginning of seconds 54 through 58, a pause, and then a seventh pip beginning on the minute.[6]

Immediately before the pips, during seconds 52 and 53 of each minute, the time of the following minute is transmitted in binary coded decimal form. Bits are sent using frequency shift keying between 2000 Hz (binary 0) and 2500 Hz (binary 1) at a rate of 30 milliseconds per bit (33⅓ baud). 32 bits are transmitted during second 52, and 16 additional bits during second 53, as follows:
JN53DV time code[6]
First segment (second 52) Second segment (second 53)
Time Bit Weight Meaning Ex Time Bit Weight Meaning Ex Time Bit Weight Meaning Ex
:52.00 0 0 Segment identification "01" 0 :52.48 16 P1 Odd parity, bits 0–16 1 :53.00 32 1 Segment identification "10" 1
:52.03 1 1 1 :52.51 17 10 Month (01–12)
Example: 05
0 :53.03 33 0 0
:52.06 2 20 Hour (00–23)
Example: 13
0 :52.54 18 8 0 :53.06 34 80 Year within century (00–99)
Example: 94
1
:52.09 3 10 1 :52.57 19 4 1 :53.09 35 40 0
:52.12 4 8 0 :52.60 20 2 0 :53.12 36 20 0
:52.15 5 4 0 :52.63 21 1 1 :53.15 37 10 1
:52.18 6 2 1 :52.66 22 20 Day of month (01–31)
Example: 01
0 :53.18 38 8 0
:52.21 7 1 1 :52.69 23 10 0 :53.21 39 4 1
:52.24 8 40 Minute (00–59)
Example: 26
0 :52.72 24 8 0 :53.24 40 2 0
:52.27 9 20 1 :52.75 25 4 0 :53.27 41 1 0
:52.30 10 10 0 :52.78 26 2 0 :53.30 42 4 Summer time warning
7: No change imminent
1–6: Days until time change
0: Today at 02:00 or 03:00
1
:52.33 11 8 0 :52.81 27 1 1 :53.33 43 2 1
:52.36 12 4 1 :52.84 28 4 Day of week (1–7)
Example: 7 = Sunday
1 :53.36 44 1 1
:52.39 13 2 1 :52.87 29 2 1 :53.39 45 SI1 1=Leap second at end of month 0
:52.42 14 1 0 :52.90 30 1 1 :53.42 46 SI2 0=Add leap, 1=subtract leap 0
:52.45 15 OE 1=Summer time 1 :52.93 31 P2 Odd parity, bits 17–31 1 :53.45 47 P3 Odd parity, bits 32–47 0

The example time is 1994-05-01 at 13:26. The day is a Sunday, summer time is in effect, and will remain so for the next week. No leap second is scheduled for the end of May.

Although the time code only includes two digits of year, it is possible to deduce two bits of century using the day of week. There is still a 400-year ambiguity, as the Gregorian calendar repeats weeks every 400 years, but this is sufficient to determine which years ending in 00 are leap years.[7]

References

  1. ^ a b .(Italian) Associazone Amici di Italcable
  2. ^ a b http://www.mwlist.org/ Search for country "I" and frequencies 10000 & 15000 kHz. Full resolution coordinates are only visible in PDF download. Direct link to less information
  3. ^ a b New italian Time Station on 10.000 kHz
  4. ^
  5. ^ a b A new Italian time stn on 10 MHz
  6. ^ a b c (Italian) Segnale orario RAI Codificato (SRC) (RAI time signal code)
  7. ^ The date XX00-02-28 must fall on a Monday, Sunday, Friday, or Wednesday. Only the first case is a leap year, followed by Tuesday the 29th. In the other three cases, the next day is March 1.


This article was sourced from Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. World Heritage Encyclopedia content is assembled from numerous content providers, Open Access Publishing, and in compliance with The Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR), Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., Public Library of Science, The Encyclopedia of Life, Open Book Publishers (OBP), PubMed, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and USA.gov, which sources content from all federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial government publication portals (.gov, .mil, .edu). Funding for USA.gov and content contributors is made possible from the U.S. Congress, E-Government Act of 2002.
 
Crowd sourced content that is contributed to World Heritage Encyclopedia is peer reviewed and edited by our editorial staff to ensure quality scholarly research articles.
 
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. World Heritage Encyclopedia™ is a registered trademark of the World Public Library Association, a non-profit organization.
 


Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from Project Gutenberg are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.