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Jake Sisko

Jake Sisko
Species Human
Born 2355
Affiliation United Federation of Planets
Posting Deep Space Nine Resident
Position Journalist
(Seasons 4-7)
Student
(Seasons 1-3)
Father Benjamin Sisko
Mother Jennifer Sisko
Portrayed by Cirroc Lofton
First appearance "Emissary" (DS9)

Jacob "Jake" Sisko, played by Cirroc Lofton, is a character on Star Trek: Deep Space Nine. He is the son of Deep Space Nine's commanding officer, Benjamin Sisko.

Overview

Jake was born in 2355 to Jennifer Sisko, who was killed in 2367 during the Battle of Wolf 359 when Benjamin Sisko served aboard the USS Saratoga (Jake was portrayed by Thomas Hobson (actor) for the Saratoga scene). In 2369, he reluctantly moved with his father to space-station Deep Space Nine.

Jake soon becomes friends with a Ferengi named Nog, son of Rom, despite the disapproval of both of their fathers. Jake and Nog become the first students to enroll in Keiko O'Brien's school. When Rom pulls Nog out of school, Jake secretly tutors him. The pair also briefly form the "No-Jay Consortium" as a front for their business schemes.

Jake aspires to be a writer, though he declines a scholarship to the Pennington School (New Zealand) in 2371. He briefly dates a Bajoran dabo girl named Mardah against the approval of his father, who embarrasses Jake by revealing his penchant for dom-jot hustling and poetry. In 2372, Jake writes a draft of his first novel, "Anslem", under the influence of Onaya, an alluring alien woman who feeds on creative neural energy by tactile absorption through the cranium ("The Muse").

As Jake becomes a young adult and feels the need for independence, he moves out of his father's quarters to become roommates with Nog, who is now a Starfleet Academy cadet on DS9 for field study. Jake's slovenliness and Nog's new-found neatness initially strain their friendship, until Benjamin Sisko, as Nog's commander and Jake's father, orders them to settle their differences.

In an alternate timeline ("The Visitor"), Benjamin Sisko is thrust into an odd sub-space dimension after being struck by an errant energy bolt in the USS Defiant engine room. After the accident, Sisko is presumed dead, but he later appears to Jake several times throughout Jake's life. After a short but successful career as a novelist (including the publication of "Anslem"), Jake spends the rest of his life trying to understand and reverse the accident. Jake learns that since he and his father were in proximity when the accident occurred, a strange side effect has been causing Jake to act as a sort of anchor to his father in sub-space through the years, occasionally pulling Benjamin Sisko into the true world. Jake determines that if he takes his own life during one of these visits, the connection will be severed and Ben will return to the time of the accident. Jake follows through with the plan, and his father returns to the past, dodges the energy bolt and prevents this timeline from occurring (Jake as an older man is portrayed in this episode by Tony Todd).

Jake introduces his father to Kasidy Yates, a freighter captain. The elder Sisko becomes romantically involved with Yates and marries her in the closing months of the Dominion War.

During the Dominion occupation of Deep Space Nine, Jake remains there and serves as a reporter for the Federation News Service, though most of his work is suppressed by Weyoun and the Dominion authorities. Nevertheless, he is able to secretly send messages to his father through Morn.

Jake Sisko does not have a counterpart in the Mirror Universe. Mirror counterparts of Benjamin and Jennifer exist there, but they separated before having a child.

In the series finale, Benjamin Sisko joins the Prophets, and although Jake is still at DS9 for the final scene of the series, it is not clear if he remains there.

References

External links

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