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Jamey Wright

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Jamey Wright

Jamey Wright
Wright with the Tampa Bay Rays
Relief Pitcher
Born: (1974-12-24) December 24, 1974
Oklahoma City, Oklahoma
Batted: Right Threw: Right
MLB debut
July 3, 1996, for the Colorado Rockies
Last appearance
September 27, 2014, for the Los Angeles Dodgers
MLB statistics
Games pitched 719
Win–loss record 97–130
Earned run average 4.81
Strikeouts 1,189
WHIP 1.54
Teams

Jamey Alan Wright (born December 24, 1974) is an American retired professional baseball pitcher. He played for 10 different teams in Major League Baseball (MLB), the Colorado Rockies, Milwaukee Brewers, St. Louis Cardinals, Kansas City Royals, San Francisco Giants, Texas Rangers, Cleveland Indians, Seattle Mariners, Los Angeles Dodgers and Tampa Bay Rays.

Contents

  • Career 1
    • Colorado Rockies 1.1
    • Milwaukee Brewers 1.2
    • St. Louis Cardinals 1.3
    • 2003 (Seattle, Milwaukee, Texas, Kansas City) 1.4
    • Colorado Rockies 1.5
    • San Francisco Giants 1.6
    • Texas Rangers 1.7
    • Kansas City Royals 1.8
    • Cleveland Indians 1.9
    • Oakland Athletics 1.10
    • Seattle Mariners 1.11
    • Los Angeles Dodgers 1.12
    • Tampa Bay Rays 1.13
    • Los Angeles Dodgers 1.14
    • Texas Rangers 1.15
    • Pitching style 1.16
  • Personal life 2
  • See also 3
  • References 4
  • External links 5

Career

Colorado Rockies

Wright was drafted in the first round of the 1993 Major League Baseball Draft by the Colorado Rockies out of Westmoore High School in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma,[1] where he was a second team High School All-American and the Southwest Region Gatorade Player of the Year. He began his career with eight starts for the Arizona League Rockies in 1993 and was promoted to the Asheville Tourists in 1994, the Salem Avalanche and New Haven Ravens in 1995 and then played with New Haven and the AAA Colorado Springs Sky Sox in 1996.

Wright made his Major League debut when he started for the Rockies against the San Francisco Giants on July 3, 1996, allowing one run in six innings. He recorded his first Major League win with a seven inning start against the Giants on July 17, where he allowed only one earned run. He started 16 games (and made 1 relief appearance) in 1996 and finished 4-4 with a 4.93 ERA in his debut season. He turned in his first complete game with a 7-1 win over the Chicago Cubs on July 24, 1997. He made 26 starts in 1997, 34 in 1998 and 16 in 1999, where he also made 17 appearances in AAA for Colorado Springs.

Milwaukee Brewers

After the 1999 season, Wright was traded with Henry Blanco to the Milwaukee Brewers in a three team trade in which the Oakland Athletics sent Jimmy Haynes to Milwaukee, the Rockies sent Justin Miller to the Athletics, and the Brewers sent Jeff Cirillo and Scott Karl to the Rockies.[2] He spent parts of three seasons with the Brewers, where he made 77 starts and was 23-34 with a 4.73 ERA.

St. Louis Cardinals

In August 2002, Wright was traded by the Brewers with cash to the St. Louis Cardinals for a player to be named later (Mike Matthews) and Chris Morris.[3] Wright was 2-0 in 4 appearances (3 starts) for the Cardinals, with a 4.80 ERA.

2003 (Seattle, Milwaukee, Texas, Kansas City)

He signed with the Seattle Mariners on January 28, 2003,[4] but was released in spring training and re-signed with the Brewers. After appearing in 7 games (4 starts) with the AAA Indianapolis Indians the Brewers released him on April 28. He was then signed by the Texas Rangers on May 7[5] and he made 7 starts for the Oklahoma RedHawks, where he was 2-1 with a 4.12 ERA. Texas released him on June 15 and he signed with the Kansas City Royals on June 20. He made 13 appearances (12 starts) in AAA with the Omaha Royals and was 3-5 with a 3.64 ERA. The Royals called him up to the Majors on September 6 and he pitched a complete game that day against the Anaheim Angels, but lost 1-3. His next start, on September 13 against the Detroit Tigers, was his first complete game shutout as the Royals beat the Tigers 7-0. He finished the season 1-2 with a 4.26 ERA in 4 starts.[6]

Colorado Rockies

He began 2004 with the Chicago Cubs but did not make the Opening Day roster so he decided to opt for free agency. He signed a minor league deal with the Royals, made 18 starts in Omaha, where he was 8-6 with a 4.21 ERA before he was released on July 21. He re-signed with the Rockies the next day and played there for two more years. He was 2-3 with a 4.12 ERA in 14 starts in 2004 and was 8-16 with a 5.46 ERA in 34 appearances (27 starts) in 2005.[6]

San Francisco Giants

He signed a minor league contract with the 2005 season and was brought to spring training in 2006 as a non-roster invitee. Following a strong spring training performance, Wright was promoted to the major league roster and named the team's number five starter, beating out Kevin Correia and Brad Hennessey for the job. On August 10, Wright was taken out of the rotation, replaced by Hennessey. Overall he appeared in 34 games, making 21 starts in 2006 with a 6-10 record and 5.19 ERA.

Wright during his tenure with the Texas Rangers in 2008

Texas Rangers

On November 1, 2006, the Giants declined their option on Wright for the 2007 season, making him a free agent.[7] On January 25, 2007, he signed a minor league contract with an invitation to spring training with the Texas Rangers.[8] Wright made one short start for the Rangers before being placed on the 15-day disabled list. Kameron Loe claimed his spot in the rotation. However, after returning from the DL, Wright returned to the rotation. In 2 seasons with the Rangers, he was 12-12 with a 4.41 ERA, pitching primarily out of the bullpen for the first time in his career.

Kansas City Royals

On February 10, 2009, Wright signed a minor league contract with the Royals and was invited to spring training.[9][10] As a key member of the Royals bullpen, he was 3-5 with a 4.33 ERA in 65 games.

Cleveland Indians

On February 9, 2010, Wright signed a minor league contract with the Cleveland Indians with an invitation to spring training.[11] In 18 appearances he was 1-2 with a 5.48 ERA. On June 4, 2010, the Indians designated Wright for assignment.[12]

Oakland Athletics

On June 16, 2010, he signed a minor league contract with the Oakland Athletics. He made 10 appearances in AAA with the Sacramento River Cats, where he was 1-0 with a 9.00 ERA.

Seattle Mariners

Wright pitching for the Seattle Mariners in 2011

On July 15, he signed with the Seattle Mariners and was added to the major league roster.[13] In 60 games, he was 2-3 with a 3.16 ERA. He became a free agent after the season.

Los Angeles Dodgers

On February 7, 2012 Wright signed a minor league contract with the Los Angeles Dodgers, that contained a spring training invitation.[14] On March 27 he was added to the teams 40 man roster and informed that he would make the opening day roster.[15] He appeared in 66 games for the Dodgers, with a 5-3 record and 3.72 ERA.

Tampa Bay Rays

On January 22, 2013, Wright signed a minor league contract with the Tampa Bay Rays.[16] He managed to make the opening day roster, and finished 2-2 with a 3.09 ERA in 66 appearances. This was the eighth straight season that Wright had gone to camp as a NRI and made the opening day roster.

Los Angeles Dodgers

Wright pitching for the Dodgers in 2014

On December 24, 2013, the Dodgers announced that they had signed Wright to a one-year Major League contract, breaking his streak of non roster invitations.[17] He appeared in 61 games, mostly in long relief, though he did start one game late in the season. His record was 5–4 with a 4.35 ERA.

Texas Rangers

On February 14, 2015, Wright signed a minor league contract with the Texas Rangers.[18][19] However, he was released on March 31 when he was unable to make the roster during spring training.[20]

Pitching style

Wright is a sinkerballer. He throws his sinker at 90–93 mph, averaging about 92. He also throws a cut fastball at 88–90 mph and an occasional four-seamer in the low 90s. His main breaking ball is a sharp curveball around 77–81 mph. Prior to the 2011 season, he threw a changeup. In 2012, he added a slider in the mid 80s to his repertoire against right-handed hitters.

Wright relies heavily on his excellent curveball in 2-strike counts. Through the first three months of the 2012 season, it achieved a ground ball/fly ball ratio of 13 to 1 and a whiff rate of more than 40%.[21]

Personal life

Wright and his wife, Marnie, have one daughter and two sons.[22] They currently live in Dallas, TX.

See also

References

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External links

  • Career statistics and player information from MLB, or ESPN, or Baseball-Reference, or Fangraphs, or The Baseball Cube, or Baseball-Reference (Minors)
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