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Jeff Burroughs

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Title: Jeff Burroughs  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
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Subject: 1974 in baseball, Ken Griffey Jr., Alex Rodriguez, Sean Burroughs, J. R. Richard
Collection: 1951 Births, American League All-Stars, American League Most Valuable Player Award Winners, American League Rbi Champions, Atlanta Braves Players, Baseball Players from California, Denver Bears Players, Living People, Major League Baseball Designated Hitters, Major League Baseball First Basemen, Major League Baseball Outfielders, National League All-Stars, Oakland Athletics Players, Seattle Mariners Players, Sportspeople from Long Beach, California, Texas Rangers Players, Toronto Blue Jays Players, Washington Senators (1961–1971) Players, Wytheville Senators Players
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Jeff Burroughs

Jeff Burroughs
Right fielder / Left fielder
Born: (1951-03-07) March 7, 1951
Long Beach, California
Batted: Right Threw: Right
MLB debut
July 20, 1970, for the Washington Senators
Last MLB appearance
October 6, 1985, for the Toronto Blue Jays
MLB statistics
Batting average .261
Home runs 240
Runs batted in 882
Teams
Career highlights and awards

Jeffrey Alan (Jeff) Burroughs (born March 7, 1951) is a former player in Major League Baseball. From 1970 through 1985, he played for the Washington Senators (1970–71), Texas Rangers (1972–76), Atlanta Braves (1977–80), Seattle Mariners (1981), Oakland Athletics (1982–84) and Toronto Blue Jays (1985). Burroughs batted and threw right-handed. He is the father of major league third baseman Sean Burroughs. In a 16-season career, Burroughs posted a .261 batting average with 240 home runs and 882 RBIs in 1689 games.

Career

Burroughs was selected by the Washington Senators with the first overall pick in the June 1969 draft. Late in the year, he joined the Senators at age of 19. Considered a "good bat-no field" kind of player, Burroughs was a considerable slugging threat during his playing days. Defensively, he was capable but slow.

In four full seasons with the Texas Rangers, Burroughs averaged 25.5 home runs a year with a high of 30 homers in 1973. His most productive season came in 1974, when he batted .301 with 25 home runs and a league-leading and career-high 118 RBIs and was selected the American League MVP, making him one of only six overall number-one picks to win the MVP title (the others are Chipper Jones, Alex Rodriguez, Ken Griffey, Jr., Joe Mauer and Josh Hamilton) and the first Ranger to win the award. During the 1974 season, Burroughs was at the center of the violent Ten Cent Beer Night debacle in Cleveland, where Burroughs was one of the targets of thrown objects and a few punches by unruly and inebriated Cleveland fans, in a game that was forfeited to Texas.

Burroughs was selected an All-Star in both 1974 with the Rangers and 1978 as a member of the Atlanta Braves, when he entered the All-Star break with a National League leading .324 Batting Average. Burroughs was also named AL Player of the Year and selected as an OF on the AL All-Star team by The Sporting News his MVP season of 1974.

As a member of the Atlanta Braves, in

Late in his career, Burroughs was still a valuable hitter, being used mainly as a DH and pinch hitter. After he retired, Burroughs later coached his son's Little League team, the Long Beach All-Stars; with Sean as their star player, these teams won the Little League World Series in both 1992 (they actually lost the championship game, but were later awarded the title by forfeit after their opponents were found to have used no fewer than 14 ineligible players) and 1993.

See also

External links

  • Career statistics and player information from Baseball-Reference, or Fangraphs, or The Baseball Cube
  • Baseball Library - profile and chronology



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